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Boxcars711 Old Time Radio

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WPNM Radio broadcast replays "From The Heart Of Germantown" (Phila.Pa) Oldies, Easy Listening, Talk and Old Time Radio.
Recent Episodes for Boxcars711 Old Time Radio
DATE: Fri, 01 Oct 2010
SIZE: 5.58 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Have Gun Will Travel" - Bonanza (08-23-59)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Have Gun Will Travel" - Bonanza (Aired August 23, 1959) The show followed the adventures of "Paladin" (no other name is ever given), a gentleman gunfighter (played by Richard Boone on television, and by John Dehner on radio), who preferred to settle problems without violence; yet, when forced to fight, excelled. Paladin lived in the Hotel Carlton in San Francisco, where he dressed in formal attire, ate gourmet food, and attended the opera. In fact, many who met him initially mistook him for a dandy from the East. But when working, he dressed in black, carried a derringer under his belt, used calling cards with a chess knight emblem, and wore a stereotypical western-style black gunbelt with the same chess knight symbol attached to the holster. The knight symbol is in reference to his name — possibly a nickname or working name — and his occupation as a champion-for-hire (see Paladin). The theme song of the series refers to him as "a knight without armor." In addition, Paladin drew a parallel between his methods and the chess piece's movement: "It's a chess piece, the most versatile on the board. It can move in eight different directions, over obstacles, and it's always unexpected." Paladin's routine switch from the expensive light-colored suit of his genteel urbane persona in San Francisco to his alter ego who wears all-black attire for quests into the lawless and barren Western frontier is also a chess reference. Paladin was a former Army officer and a graduate of the West Point Military Academy. He was a polyglot, capable of speaking any foreign tongue required by the plot. He also had a thorough knowledge of ancient history and classical literature, and he exhibited a strong passion for legal principles and the rule of law. Paladin was also a world traveler. His exploits had included an 1857 visit to India, where he had won the respect of the natives as a hunter of man-eating tigers. THIS EPISODE: August 23, 1959. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "Bonanza". Samuel Curry hires Paladin to rid his silver mine of ghosts! John Dehner, Ben Wright, Virginia Gregg, Harry Bartell, Frank Paris (producer, director, writer), Hugh Douglas (announcer), James Nusser, Helen Kleeb, Bartlett Robinson, Bill James (sound effects), Tom Hanley (sound effects), Sam Rolfe (creator), Herb Meadow (creator). 25 minutes.

DATE: Fri, 01 Oct 2010
SIZE: 7.45 MB
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The New Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes - The Mystery Of The Headless Monk (04-15-46)

The Mystery Of The Headless Monk (Aired April 15, 1946) Sherlock Holmes remains a great inspiration for forensic science, especially for the way his acute study of a crime scene yields small clues as to the precise sequence of events. He makes great use of trace evidence such as shoe and tire impressions, as well as fingerprints, ballistics and handwriting analysis, now known as questioned document examination. Such evidence is used to test theories conceived by the police, for example, or by the investigator himself. All of the techniques advocated by Holmes would later become reality, but were generally in their infancy at the time Conan Doyle was writing. In many of his reported cases, Holmes frequently complains of the way the crime scene has been contaminated by others, especially by the police, emphasising the critical importance of maintaining its integrity, a now well-known feature of crime scene examination. Owing to the small scale of the trace evidence (such as tobacco ash, hair or fingerprints), he often uses a magnifying glass at the scene, and an optical microscope back at his lodgings in Baker Street. He uses analytical chemistry for blood residue analysis as well as toxicology examination and determination for poisons. Holmes seems to have maintained a small chemistry laboratory in his lodgings, presumably using simple wet chemical methods for detection of specific toxins, for example. Ballistics is used when spent bullets can be recovered, and their calibre measured and matched with a suspect murder weapon. Holmes was also very perceptive of the dress and demeanour of his clients and others, noting style and state of wear of their clothes, any contamination (such as clay on boots), their state of mind and physical condition in order to infer their origin and recent history. Skin marks such as tattoos could reveal much about their past history. He applied the same method to personal items such as walking sticks (famously in The Hound of the Baskervilles) or hats (in the case of The Blue Carbuncle), with small details such as medallions, wear and contamination yielding vital indicators of their absent owners. THIS EPISODE: April 15, 1946. Mutual network. "The Headless Monk". Sponsored by: Petri Wines. Holmes investigates a haunted chapel with a strangely preserved organ, playing a hymn to murder! The story is based on the story, "The Adventure Of The Devil's Foot." Basil Rathbone, Nigel Bruce, Harry Bartell (announcer), Dean Fosler (music), Edna Best (producer), Arthur Conan Doyle (creator). 39:35.

DATE: Thu, 30 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.04 MB
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Barry Craig Confidential Investigator - Kitchens Come With Knives (09-22-53)

Kitchens Come With Knives (Aired September 22, 1953) Originally aired October 31, 1951 Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator is one of the few detective radio series that had separate versions of it broadcast from both coasts. Even the spelling changed over the years. It was first "Barry Crane" and then "Barrie Craig". NBC produced it in New York from 1951 to 1954 and then moved it to Hollywood where it aired from 1954 to 1955. It attracted only occasional sponsors so it was usually a sustainer. William Gargan, who also played the better known television (and radio) detective Martin Kane, was the voice of New York eye BARRY CRAIG while Ralph Bell portrayed his associate, Lt. Travis Rogers. Craig's office was on Madison Avenue and his adventures were fairly standard PI fare. He worked alone, solved cases efficiently, and feared no man. As the promos went, he was "your man when you can't go to the cops. Confidentiality a speciality." Like Sam Spade, Craig narrated his stories, in addition to being the leading character in this 30 minute show. Nearly sixty episodes are in trading circulation today William Gargan as a Detective (and an actor) If William Gargan brought an air of authenticity to his roles as a private detective, there were some good very reasons. His father was a bookmaker, so Gargan learned a lot about the gambling world and met a lot of interesting characters from across the spectrum of society. The main reason why Gargan was so convincing as a detective was that he was probably the only actor of his time who had actually been a private detective. He first worked as a credit investigator and collection agent for a clothing firm. Once Gargan was shot at when he attempted to get a deadbeat customer to pay his overdue account. Next, he worked for about a year as a private detective with a New York agency for "$10.00 a day and expenses." Gargan did many of the usual detective jobs: guarding payrolls, tailing possible suspects, conducting stakeouts, and protecting clients with valuables. He was fired when he lost track of a diamond salesman he was supposed to be protecting. As an actor, William Gargan had played Ellery Queen in three movies, before being cast as Kane. After he left Martin Kane, Gargan landed on his feet. He signed a million dollar, seven year contract with MCA for the radio show Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator on NBC. The final spelling used for his character's first name, Barrie, was the same as that of Gargan's oldest son. Gargan eventually got throat cancer, had a laryngectomy and campaigned vigorously (and rather ironically) against smoking for The American Cancer Society for the last twenty years of his life).

DATE: Thu, 30 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.61 MB
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Our Miss Brooks - The Hair Do (03-06-49)

The Hair Do (Aired March 6, 1949) Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, at the time CBS's West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to be the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Then CBS chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script---Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal---Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on CBS July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast---blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright---also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this (award) two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. THIS EPISODE: March 6, 1949. CBS network. "The Hair Do" - Sponsored by: Palmolive Soap, Lustre Creme Shampoo, Palmolive Shave Cream. There's going to be a faculty dance at Madison High, so Miss Brooks gets a radical new hair cut. Eve Arden, Gale Gordon, Jeff Chandler, Gloria McMillan, Jane Morgan, Richard Crenna, Mary Jane Croft, Margaret MacDonald, Verne Smith (announcer), Bob Lemond (announcer). 29:51.

DATE: Thu, 30 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.83 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Hopalong Cassidy" - Hoppy And The Iron Horse (09-24-50)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Hopalong Cassidy" - Hoppy And The Iron Horse (Aired September 24, 1950) Hopalong Cassidy is a cowboy hero, created in 1904 by Clarence E. Mulford, who wrote a series of popular stories and twenty-eight novels. (At the time Mulford invented the character, the name of the historical American outlaw Butch Cassidy had been before readers of newspapers in recent years.) In his early print appearances, the character appears as a rude, dangerous and rough-talking "galoot". Beginning in 1935, the character, played by William Boyd, was transformed into the clean-cut hero of a series of 66 immensely popular films, only a few of which relied on Mulford's works for more than the character. Mulford actually rewrote his earlier stories to fit the movie conception; these led in turn to a comic book series modeled after the films. The enormous success of the television series made Boyd a star. The Mutual Broadcasting System began broadcasting a radio version of Hopalong Cassidy, with Andy Clyde (later George McMichael on Walter Brennan's ABC sitcom The Real McCoys) as the sidekick, in January 1950; at the end of September, the show moved to CBS Radio, where it ran into 1952. Hopalong Cassidy also appeared on the cover of national magazines, such as Look, Life, and Time. Boyd earned millions as Hopalong ($800,000 in 1950 alone), mostly from merchandise licensing and endorsement deals. In 1950, Hopalong Cassidy was featured on the first lunch box to bear an image, causing sales for Aladdin Industries to jump from 50,000 units to 600,000 units in just one year. In stores, more than 100 companies in 1950 manufactured $70 million of Hopalong Cassidy products, including children's dinnerware, pillows, roller skates, soap, wristwatches, and jackknives. There was also a new demand for Hopalong Cassidy features in movie theaters, and Boyd licensed reissue distributor Film Classics to make new film prints and advertising accessories. Another 1950 enterprise saw the home-movie company Castle Films manufacturing condensed versions of the Paramount films for 16 mm and 8 mm projectors; they were sold through 1966. Boyd began work on a separate series of half-hour westerns made especially for television. Edgar Buchanan was the new sidekick, Red Connors (a character from the original stories and a few of the early films). The theme music for the television show was written by veteran songwriters Nacio Herb Brown (music) and L. Wolfe Gilbert (lyrics). The show ranked number 7 in the 1949 Nielsen ratings. The success of the show and tie-ins inspired several juvenile TV Westerns, including The Gene Autry Show and The Roy Rogers Show. Boyd's company devoted to Hopalong Cassidy, U.S. Television Office, is still active and has released many of the features to DVD, many of them in sparkling prints prepared by Film Classics. THIS EPISODE: September 24, 1950. Program #39. Commodore syndication. "Hoppy and The Iron Horse". Commercials added locally. Lee Garvin introduces Hoppy to foul play on the railroad. William Boyd, Joseph Du Val, Walter White Jr. (transcriber, producer), Tom Shirley (writer). 29:30.

DATE: Thu, 30 Sep 2010
SIZE: 10.1 MB
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The CBS Radio Mystery Theater - The Apparition (05-06-81)

The Apparition (Aired May 6, 1981) The CBS Radio Mystery Theater (or CBSRMT) was an ambitious and sustained attempt to revive the great drama of old-time radio in the 1970s. Created by Himan Brown (who had by then become a radio legend due to his work on Inner Sanctum Mysteries and other shows dating back to the 1930s), and aired on affiliate stations across the CBS Radio network, the series began its long run on January 6, 1974. The final episode ran on December 31, 1982. The show was broadcast nightly and ran for one hour, including commercials. Typically, a week consisted of three to four new episodes, with the remainder of the week filled out with reruns. There were a total of 1399 original episodes broadcast. The total number of broadcasts, including reruns, was 2969. The late E.G. Marshall hosted the program every year but the final one, when actress Tammy Grimes took over. Each episode began with the ominous sound of a creaking door, slowly opening to invite listeners in for the evening's adventure. At the end of each show, the door would swing shut, with Marshall signing off, "Until next time, pleasant...dreams?" Despite the show's title, Brown expanded its scope beyond mysteries to include horror, science fiction, historical drama, and even comedy. In addition to original stories, there were adaptations of classic tales by such writers as Edgar Allan Poe (no fewer than seven Poe stories were adapted in 1975 alone), O. Henry, Mark Twain, Ambrose Bierce, Charles Dickens and others. Later in the series Brown even experimented with multi-part, five-episode adaptations of novels such as Les Misérables and The Last Days of Pompeii, as well as an original five-part story about Egyptian queen Nefertiti with Tammy Grimes in the title role. In 1982, Tammy Grimes hosted the final season of The CBS Radio Mystery Theater. A host of prominent actors from radio and screen performed on the series, including Agnes Moorehead, Joan Hackett, Mercedes McCambridge, Morey Amsterdam, Roy Thinnes, Keir Dullea, Fred Gwynne, Richard Crenna, Kim Hunter, Larry Haines, Morgan Fairchild, John Lithgow, and even a very young Sarah Jessica Parker.

DATE: Wed, 29 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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The Bob & Ray Show - Offical Baseball Rules Book (07-20-49)

Offical Baseball Rules Book (Aired July 20, 1949) Bob Elliott (born 1923) and Ray Goulding (1922–1990) were an American comedy team whose career spanned five decades. Their format was typically to satirize the medium in which they were performing, such as conducting radio or television interviews, with off-the-wall dialogue presented in a generally deadpan style as though it were a serious interview. Elliott and Goulding began as disc jockeys in Boston with their own separate programmes on station WHDH-AM, and each would visit with the other while on the air. Their informal banter was so appealing that WHDH would call on them, as a team, to fill in when Red Sox baseball broadcasts were rained out. Elliott and Goulding (not yet known as Bob and Ray) would improvise comedy routines all afternoon, and joke around with studio musicians. Elliott and Goulding's brand of humor caught on, and WHDH gave them their own weekday show in 1946. Matinee with Bob and Ray was originally a 15-minute show, soon expanding to half an hour. This is why Elliott and Goulding became known as Bob and Ray. Ray Goulding said that Matinee with Bob and Ray sounded better than Matinob with Ray and Bob. They continued on the air for over four decades on the NBC, CBS, and Mutual networks, and on New York City stations WINS, WOR, and WHN. From 1973 to 1976 they were the afternoon drive hosts on WOR, doing a four-hour show. In their last incarnation, they were heard on National Public Radio, ending in 1987. THIS EPISODE: July 20, 1949. "Offical Baseball Rules Book" - WHDH, Boston. Sponsored by: Chesterfield, The Casino At Magnolia, Cynthia Sweets,. Wonderland Revere, T-O Orange Syrup. Bob Elliott, Ray Goulding, Bill Green (piano), Ken Wilson (organ). 30:20.

DATE: Wed, 29 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.79 MB
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The Aldrich Family - Cross Country Race (06-12-40)

Cross Country Race (Aired June 12, 1940) The Aldrich Family, a popular radio teenage situation comedy (1939-1953), is remembered first and foremost for its unforgettable introduction: awkward teen Henry's mother calling, "Hen-reeeeeeeeeeeee! Hen-ree Al-drich!" A top-ten ratings hit within two years of its birth (in 1941, the showm carried a 33.4 Crossley rating, landing it solidly alongside Jack Benny and Bob Hope), the show is considered a prototype for teen-oriented situation comedies to follow on radio and television and is a favourite if dated find for old-time radio collectors today. The Aldrich Family as a separate radio show was born as a summer replacement for Jack Benny in NBC's Sunday night lineup, July 2, 1939, and it stayed there until October 1, 1939, when it moved to Tuesday nights at 8 p.m., sponsored by General Foods's popular gelatin dessert Jell-O---which also sponsored Jack Benny at the time. The Aldriches ran in that slot from October 10, 1939 until May 28, 1940, moving to Thursdays, from July 4, 1940 until July 20, 1944. After a brief hiatus, the show moved to CBS, running on Fridays from September 1, 1944 until August 30, 1946 with sponsors Grape Nuts and Jell-O,.before moving back to NBC from September 05, 1946 to June 28, 1951 on Thursdays and, then, its final run of September 21, 1952 to April 19, 1953 on Sundays.

DATE: Wed, 29 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.67 MB
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Hollywood Star Playhouse - Hour Of Truth (09-20-51)

Hour Of Truth (Aired September 20, 1951) The Hollywood Star Playhouse , well written and performed, presented many original plays and popular Hollywood stars. Some of those who accepted roles in this great series included Jimmy Stewart, William Conrad, Deborah Kerr, Vincent Price, Harry Bartell and Betty Lou Gerson. Highlights included an episode entitled The Six Shooter and which later became it’s own series staring James Stewart. In 1952, Marilyn Monroe made her radio debut on The Hollywood Star Playhouse. This 30 minute anthology program was heard over three different networks during its three seasons. Many leading Hollywood stars appeared before the microphones for this programs original scripts. Several programs were intended to become new series. On 04/13/52, the broadcast # 99 of The Six Shooter w/James Stewart did indeed become a new NBC series The Six Shooter in 1953, while the broadcast of 05/18/52 #104 Safari w/Ray Milland failed to make it. There was a title change to this series. During the third network change to NBC the series picked up the sponsorship of the American Bakers and the series was called Baker’s Theater Of Stars. THIS EPISODE: September 20, 1951. ABC network. "Hour Of Truth". Sustaining. An affair of honor, as an older man fights his last bull. Alan Reed, Basil Adlam (composer, conductor), Robert Griffin, Gerald Mohr, Harry Bartell, Jack Johnstone (director), Joan Banks, Orval Anderson (announcer), Robert Libbott (writer), Vincent Price. 29:30.

DATE: Wed, 29 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.62 MB
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You Bet Your Life - Secret Word Is 'Dress' (06-07-50)

Secret Word Is 'Dress' (Aired June 7, 1950) Contestant teams usually consisted of one male and one female, most selected from the studio audience. Occasionally famous or otherwise interesting figures were invited to play (i.e., a Korean-American contestant who was a veteran and had been a prisoner of war during the Korean War). After his signature introduction of "Here he is: the one, the ONLY..." by Fenneman and finished by a thunderous "GROUCHO!" from the audience, Marx would be introduced to the music of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding", his signature song. Some show tension revolved around whether a contestant would say the "secret word", a common word revealed to the audience at the show's outset. If a contestant said the word, a toy duck resembling Groucho with a mustache and eyeglasses, and with a cigar in its bill, descended from the ceiling to bring a $100 bill. A cartoon of a duck with a cigar was also used in opening title sequence. In one episode, Groucho's brother, Harpo, came down instead of the duck, and in another, a model came down in a birdcage with the money. Marx sometimes slyly directed conversation to encourage the secret word to come up. The duck was also occasionally replaced with a wooden Indian figure. After the contestants' introduction and interview, the actual game began. Contestants chose among available categories and then tried to answer a series of questions within the category. Each couple was staked with $20 and were asked four questions, wagering part or all of their bankroll for each question. The scoring format was later changed to a starting bankroll of $100 and couples selecting question values from $10 to $100. A correct answer added the value of the question to their bankroll and an incorrect answer cut their bankroll to that point in half. According to co-director Robert Dwan in his book, As Long As They're Laughing, Guedel changed the scoring format because too many couples were betting—and losing—all their money.

DATE: Tue, 28 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.64 MB
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The Whisperer - The Woman On Ice (09-09-51)

The Woman On Ice (Aired September 9, 1951) The Whisperer was created by the writing team of Irene Humphrey and her husband, Dr. Stetson Humphrey, a voice coach to the stars and music director. Their protagonist, The Whisperer, is Philip 'Phil' Galt, a Central City attorney who lost most of his voice in an accident that crushed his vocal chords. The accident forced him to express himself in an eery, foreboding whisper. Phil Galt 'skirts the thin edges of danger, living his dual role' as attorney and his alias, The Whisperer, relentless crime-fighter against organized crime, or 'The Syndicate.' Galt used his legal contacts and knowledge of the Law to burrow deep into 'The Syndicate' in order to influence their actions and wreck havoc with their various new--and tried and true--criminal schemes. A subsequent surgical operation by famed surgeon Dr. Benjamin Lee, restored attorney Galt's voice, but Galt continues to employ his gruesome whisper to both retain his cover, and to further gain access to--and influence over--The Syndicate. He's aided by Ellen Norris, formerly a nurse who'd assisted Dr. Lee in restoring Galt's vocal chords. She becomes Galt's assistant and love interest for the remainder of the production. Phillip Galt is portrayed by Carleton G. Young, one of Radio's most recognizable voices. The part of Ellen Norris is portrayed by Betty Moran, a solid Radio character actor and aspiring B-Film actress and songstress. Once Galt reveals himself to Ellen as The Whisperer, she reluctantly agrees to aid Galt in his dual-identity, while attempting to discourage him from undertaking the more dangerous aspects of his fight against organized crime. The far more successful examples of this genre often benefitted from some of the 19th and 20th Century's greatest authors, writers and adapters. This short-lived series was, by contrast, penned by NBC writers Jonathan Price and Ann Gill. Given the narrow, short-lived arc of the premise of The Whisperer character and his quest, the writing remains consistent and effective for all thirteen circulating exemplars. The overarching theme is not particularly remarkable compared to its numerous predecessors, but the wrinkle is unique, and Galt's dual-identity translates well in this rare, short-lived series. THIS EPISODE: September 9, 1951. "The Woman On Ice" - NBC network. Sustaining. The Whisperer gives the syndicate's instructions. It's only one word, "Now." Carleton Young, Betty Moran, Stetson Humphrey (creator), John Duffy (original music), Bill Cairn (producer, director), Don Rickles (announcer), Sidney Miller, Stacy Harris, Charles Moody, Michael Ann Barrett, Jonathan Twice (writer). 29:26.

DATE: Tue, 28 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Gunsmoke" - The Bottle Man (01-01-55)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Gunsmoke" - The Bottle Man (Aired January 1, 1955) Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. The stories take place in and around Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West. The radio version ran from 1952 to 1961, and John Dunning writes that among radio drama enthusiasts "Gunsmoke is routinely placed among the best shows of any kind and any time." The television version ran for 20 seasons from 1955 to 1975, and still remains the United States' longest-running prime time, live-action drama with 635 episodes ("Law and Order" ended in 2010 with 476 episodes). The half-hour animated comedy "The Simpsons", is slated for a 21st season in Fall 2010. In the late 1940s, CBS chairman William S. Paley, a fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe radio serial, asked his programming chief, Hubell Robinson, to develop a hardboiled Western series, a show about a "Philip Marlowe of the Old West." Robinson instructed his West Coast CBS Vice-President, Harry Ackerman, who had developed the Philip Marlowe series, to take on the task. Ackerman and his scriptwriters, Mort Fine and David Friedkin, created an audition script called "Mark Dillon Goes to Gouge Eye". Two auditions were created in 1949. The first was very much like a hardboiled detective series and starred Rye Billsbury as Dillon; the second starred Straight Arrow actor Howard Culver in a more Western, lighter version of the same script. CBS liked the Culver version better, and Ackerman was told to proceed. But there was a complication. Culver's contract as the star of Straight Arrow would not allow him to do another Western series. The project was shelved for three years, when MacDonnell and Meston discovered it creating an adult Western series of their own. MacDonnell and Meston wanted to create a radio Western for adults, in contrast to the prevailing juvenile fare such as The Lone Ranger and The Cisco Kid. Gunsmoke was set in Dodge City, Kansas during the thriving cattle days of the 1870s. Dunning notes, "The show drew critical acclaim for unprecedented realism." THIS EPISODE: January 1, 1955. CBS network. "The Bottle Man". Sponsored by: L & M. An old drunk named Tom Cassidy is determined to kill a gambler named Bill Clell, for a good reason. The script was used on the Gunsmoke television series on March 22, 1958. Tom Hanley (sound patterns), Ray Kemper (sound patterns), George Fenneman (commercial spokesman), William Conrad, Parley Baer, Howard McNear, John Meston (writer), Lawrence Dobkin, Eleanor Tannen, Ralph Moody, Georgia Ellis, Norman Macdonnell (producer, transcriber), Rex Koury (composer, conductor), George Walsh (announcer). 30:23.

DATE: Tue, 28 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.78 MB
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Rogue's Gallery - Murder With Muriel (10-25-45)

Murder With Muriel (Aired October 25, 1945) Rogue's Gallery came to the Mutual network on September 27, 1945 with Dick Powell portraying Richard Rogue, a private detective who invariably ended up getting knocked out each week and spending his dream time in acerbic conversation with his subconscious self, Eugor. Rogue's Gallery was, in a sense, Dick Powell's rehearsal for Richard Diamond, Private Detective. Powell played private detective Richard Rogue, who trailed luscious blondes, protected witness, and did whatever else detectives do to make a living. It was a good series, though not destined to make much of a mark. Under the capable direction of Dee Englebach and accompanied by the music of Leith Stevens, Powell floated through his lines with the help of such competents as Lou Merrill, Gerald Mohr, Gloria Blondell, Tony Barrett, and Lurene Tuttle. Peter Leeds played Rogue's friend Eugor, an obscure play on names with Eugor spelling Rogue backwards. The gimmick in Rogue's Gallery was the presence of an alter ego, "Eugor," who arrived in the middle of the show to give Rogue enough information for his final deduction. Eugor was a state of mind, achieved when Rogue was knocked unconcious. Eugor would appear cackling like the host of Hermit's Cave and imparted some vital information the hero had overlooked. Rogue would then awaken with a vague idea of what to do next. Rogue's Gallery also starred different actors as Rogue, in later incarnations of the series, but Richard Powell was the most popular. This series preceded Richard Powell's most famous series, Richard Diamond, Private Detective. Rogue trailed lovely blondes and protected witnesses in the new tough guy persona of Dick Powell. This was the transition series for Powell in his quest to be recognized as an actor rather than a singer. It had some of the same cute elements that would make Richard Diamond a high spot four years later. During the summer of 1946, the show was billed as Bandwagon Mysteries, with a tip of the hat to the sponsor. In the summer of 1947, it was again revived on NBC Sundays for Fitch, with Barry Sullivan in the title role. In 1950 the character again turned up in a two-year sustainer on the ABC Wednesday-night schedule. Chester Morris played the lead. Chester Morris was the original Boston Blackie. THIS EPISODE: October 25, 1945. Mutual network. "Murder With Muriel". Sponsored by: Fitch's Shampoo, Fitch's Shaving Cream. Joe Layton has been murdered for his half of a map worth $25,000. Rogue's expecting the other half. Surprise: Richard Rogue does not get hit on the head during this program! Dee Englebach (producer, director), Dick Powell, Leith Stevens (composer, conductor), Ray Buffum (writer), Peter Leeds. 29:28.

DATE: Mon, 27 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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Honest Harold Perry - Plan To Rename Boomer Park (09-24-50)

Plan To Rename Boomer Park (Aired September 24, 1950) Honest Harold Hemp lived with his mother and nephew and did a radio homemaker's program. The series received undeserved negative ratings and general negative attitude of the critics. The Honest Harold scripts were well crafted with well developed characters and had excellent acting and production values. Many people, including Harold Peary, believed that THE Great Gildersleeve would not survive without Peary. However, Willard Waterman assumed the role and most listeners didn't notice the difference, as Mr. Waterman did an excellent job in capturing the essence of the Gildersleeve character. This may have been the single greatest blow to the survival of Honest Harold. There were just too many similarities between the two series. Also, the series was without a sponsor, although some of the last shows were sponsored by the US Armed Forces. The series lasted only one season. The regular cast consisted of Harold Peary, Gloria Holiday, Joseph Kearns, Mary Jane Croft and Parley Baer. The announcer was Bob Lamond. The series was directed by Norman MacDonnell. Writers for the series were Harold Peary, Bill Danch, Jack Robinson and Gene Stone. Music was by Jack Meakin. THIS EPISODE: September 24, 1950. CBS network. Sustaining. "Plan To Rename Boomer Park". Harold Peary, Gene Stone (writer), Jack Robinson (writer), Jack Meakin (composer, conductor), Norman Macdonnell (director), Jane Morgan, Eddie Firestone, Isabel Randolph, Parley Baer, Maurey Alden, Gloria Holiday, Joseph Kearns, Bob Lemond (announcer). 29:50.

DATE: Mon, 27 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.38 MB
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Inner Sanctum Mysteries- Lonely Sleep (09-25-49)

Lonely Sleep (Aired September 25, 1949) Inner Sanctum Mysteries was a horror anthology series with a unique sound and a very popular host. For the first four years, "Raymond" greeted guests after an incredibly squeaky door slowly opened at the beginning of each show. His ghoulish puns were accentuated with the flourish of what sounded like a baseball park organ. The stories themselves were directed by Himan Brown, one of the most prolific and talented radio directors of all time (Flash Gordon, Dick Tracy, Bulldog Drummond, The Adventures of the Thin Man, Terry and the Pirates, Grand Central Station, and many others). The stories took all sorts of twists and turns, and the body count often exceeded the number of commercials. As Brown himself described it, "We've killed our characters every way. We've knifed them, garroted them, burned them, poisoned them, bashed their heads, given them rare and fantastic diseases, pushed them out of windows and over cliffs." (Grams, 2002, 7) The mood was straight faced and serious, except that Raymond would return during the breaks and loosen up the crowd with his morbid sense of humor. His laugh was particularly sinister, and the organ player (Lew White) knew just how to play off of it. Inner Sanctum featured classic actors, including Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, Mercedes McCambridge, Richard Widmark, Santos Ortega, Simone Simon, Raymond Massy, Mason Adams, Agnus Moorehead and countless others. In addition to the foreboding background music, the tension filled atmosphere was something to die for. Talk about spooky! The crickets and hoot owls worked overtime, along with the sound effects man, who's most common effect was probably a shovel digging dirt for another late night grave. "I use sound unashamedly," Brown told The New York Times in 1948. "In a program like Inner Sanctum, where mood is of the essence, I believe in a minimum of writing. The sound really gives the picture. So let the sound carry it." Brown then gave an example of the type of story telling that Inner Sanctum delivered without words. "A car pulls up. Car door opens. Footsteps on gravel, with background of wind and owl sounds. Footsteps stop. Clank of handle of iron door (obviously of mausoleum). Door opens. Footsteps resume, this time on stone, and outdoor effects of wind and owl fade out. Door clanks shut. Then the actor can scream out in terror." (Grams, 2002, 21) Scenes like that really put listeners in the thick of the action, and they gave Inner Sanctum an especially vivid atmosphere that other horror shows lacked, despite equally good plots.

DATE: Mon, 27 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.78 MB
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Dad's Army - A Soldiers Farewell (06-02-72)

A Soldiers Farewell (Aired June 2, 1972) "Dad's Army" was a long running British comedy series created and written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft. The idea of a series came to Jimmy Perry when he realised that many people had forgotten about the contribution the Home Guard had made to the British Home Front during the years of the Second World War. Commencing in 1968, "Dad's Army" ran on BBC Television for 9 years with over eighty episodes spread within 10 series. The series is set in a small fictional seaside town called Walmington-on-Sea somewhere on the South Coast of England. "Dad's Army" is also remembered for its first class actors which starred amongst its credits, Arthur Lowe as Captain Mainwaring, John Le Mesurier as Sergeant Arthur Wilson and Clive Dunn as Lance Corporal Jack Jones. THIS EPISODE: June 2, 1972 - "A Soldiers Farewell" - Mainwaring, depressed as his men are not living up to his expectations, and believing his leadership to be unappreciated, dreams he is Napoleon after eating too much toasted cheese.

DATE: Mon, 27 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.28 MB
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The Hallmark Playhouse - McClouds Folly (01-06-49)

McClouds Folly (Aired January 6, 1949) The Hallmark Playhouse was heard over CBS stations Thursday evenings. This drama anthology of 30-minute shows was sponsored by, of course, Hallmark Greeting Cards. It was preceded by the RADIO READER'S DIGEST, which ran from September 13, 1942 thorugh June 3, 1948. Hallmark sponsored the Radio Reader's Digest from January 13, 1946 to it's end. On Feb. 8, 1953, the series name and format was changed. It was now called The Hallmark Playhouse OF FAME and presented biographal sketches of famous persons, past and present. The new format was used until the end of the 1955 season. The exception to the new format was the broadcast each Christmas season of "A Christmas Carol". Like other dramatic series of this time, this one made use of major screen actors in the productions. James Hilton, author of "Random Harvest", "Lost Horizon" and "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" plus others, served as host and Narrator. Dee Engelbach produced and directed the shows. Jean Holloway was the writer. Sound Effects were by Harry Essman and Gene Twombly. Musical conductor was Lyn Murray. The show's theme was "Dream of Olwne" by Charles Williams. THIS EPISODE: January 6, 1949. CBS network. "MacLeod's Folly". Sponsored by: Hallmark Cards. A wandering ex-newspaperman breaks a boss' grip on a small town during the Depression. Dee Englebach (producer, director), Frank Goss (announcer), Jack Rubin (adaptor), James Hilton (intermission commentator), Louis Bromfield (panelist), Lyn Murray (music), Robert Young. 29:36.

DATE: Sun, 26 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.41 MB
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Screen Guild Players - The Amazing Doctor Clitterhouse (11-02-41)

The Amazing Doctor Clitterhouse (Aired November 2, 1941) The Screen Guild Theater was a popular radio anthology series during the Golden Age of Radio broadcast from 1939 until 1952 with leading Hollywood actors performing in adaptations of popular motion pictures such as Going My Way and The Postman Always Rings Twice. The show had a long run, lasting for 14 seasons and 527 episodes. It initially was heard on CBS from January 8, 1939 until June 28, 1948, continuing on NBC from October 7, 1948 until June 29, 1950. It was broadcast on ABC from September 7, 1950 to May 31, 1951 and returned to CBS on March 13, 1952. It aired under several different titles: The Gulf Screen Guild Show, The Gulf Screen Guild Theater, The Lady Esther Screen Guild Theater and The Camel Screen Guild Theater. Actors on the series included Ethel Barrymore, Lionel Barrymore, Ingrid Bergman, Humphrey Bogart, Eddie Cantor, Gary Cooper, Bing Crosby, Bette Davis, Jimmy Durante, Nelson Eddy, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Clark Gable, Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Johnny Mercer, Agnes Moorehead, Gregory Peck, Fred Astaire, Frank Sinatra and Dinah Shore. Fees these actors would typically charge were donated to the Motion Picture Relief Fund, in order to support the creation and maintenance of the Motion Picture Country Home for retired actors. THIS EPISODE: November 2, 1941 - "Screen Guild Players" - The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse is a 1938 Warner Bros. crime film starring Edward G. Robinson, Claire Trevor and Humphrey Bogart. It was directed by Anatole Litvak and written by John Wexley and John Huston based on the first play written by short-story writer Barré Lyndon, which ran for three months on Broadway with Cedric Hardwicke[1] after playing in London. Dr. Clitterhouse is a wealthy society doctor in New York City who decides to research the medical aspects of criminal behavior directly by becoming one. He begins a series of daring jewel robberies, measuring his own blood pressure, temperature and pulse before, during and afterwards, but yearns for a larger sample for his study. From one of his patients, Police Inspector Lewis Lane (Donald Crisp), he learns the name of the biggest fence in the city, Joe Keller. He goes to meet Keller to sell what he has stolen, only to find out that "Joe" is actually "Jo" (Claire Trevor). The doctor impresses Jo and a gang of thieves headed by 'Rocks' Valentine (Humphrey Bogart) with his exploits, so Jo invites him to join them, and he accepts.

DATE: Sun, 26 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.38 MB
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Agatha Christie Presents Hercule Poirot - Money Mad Goul (9-13-45)

Money Mad Goul (Aired September 13, 1945) Hercule Poirot is Agatha Christie's greatest creation, many say. One of the most famous detectives in all fiction, he was created in 1916 (when Agatha Christie penned the first novel The Mysterious Affair at Styles). The Belgian detective appeared in 33 novels and 65 short stories and is the only fictional character to be honored with a front page obituary of The New York Times. He doesn't have any disorders to speak of, but demands order. He likes things in an orderly manner (ie, books arranged on a shelf according to height) and approves of symmetry everywhere (residence Whitehaven Mansions is picked because of its symmetry). He despises dust and unclean homes and favors the indoors (especially central heating in the winter). Poirot also values method--to him the greatest method or tool in solving crime is using the "gray cells" of the brain. He derides such methods as examing footprints, collecting cigarette ash, searching for clues with a magnifying glass, or taking fingerprints. He says any crime can be solved with simply placing the puzzle pieces correctly. He is an armchair detective-- he has to simply "sit still in an armchair and think". Of course, Poirot's mustache is as famous as his "little gray cells". He has pride is his luscious, waxed black mustache and is always meticulously dressed down to his patent leather shoes. THIS EPISODE: September 13, 1945 - "The Adventure Of The Money Mad Ghoul" - Mutual network. Sustaining. Hercule finds himself in a coffin, wearing a strong perfume, to track down a series of missing corpses. Harold Huber, Jackson Beck, Sylvan Levin (music). 29:02

DATE: Sat, 25 Sep 2010
SIZE: 13.5 MB
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Richard Diamond Private Detective - 2 Episodes From 1950

"The Joyce Wallace Case" (03-12-50) and "The Ivory Statue" (04-05-50) Throughout Richard Powell's meteoric music career during the 1930s, Powell was the baby-faced crooner that preceded Frank Sinatra in setting the Great Depression era gals' hearts to fluttering. Richard Powell, for his part was already well into long pants, and trying to break into solid, dramatic Film roles. Given the Studio System of the era, Powell found himself offered only musicals or musical comedies in his Film career. Whenever Powell would seek more dramatic roles, his studio heads would veto the project. Powell persisted, and lobbied hard for the male lead in the film noir classic, Double Indemnity (1944) but lost the role to Fred MacMurray. But as if fated, Powell landed the role of Philip Marlowe in the other notable film noir classic of 1944, Murder, My Sweet. Largely on the strength of his critical and popular success in Murder, My Sweet, he persuaded F.W. Fitch, the sponsor of his long-running Fitch Bandwagon Radio variety series to give Powell a try at a detective mystery series for the 1945 Summer season of Fitch Bandwagon, retitled, Fitch Bandwagon Mysteries, then ultimately, Rogue's Gallery. Fitch Bandwagon Mysteries' Rogue's Gallery was an almost instant hit for Powell, and resulted in an eventual franchise of seven years of Rogue's Gallery, three years of which starred Dick Powell as Richard Rogue. Powell's critical and popular success in the film Johnny O'Clock (1947) further established his reputation as a solid dramatic actor. And while his critical and popular success in Film continued to rise, his sponsor of long standing, F.W. Fitch, was being sued by the Government over it's elaborate claims to 'cure' dandruff. Powell left the Fitch-sponsored Rogue's Gallery franchise upon completing the Summer Season of 1946.But within two years, Dick Powell and NBC struck a deal to essentially reintroduce Powell's Richard Rogue character as Richard Diamond, Private Detective, or as it was often referred to, Richard Diamond, The Singing Detective. (Notes From The Digital Deli) TODAY'S SHOW: March 12, 1950. "The Joyce Wallace Case" - NBC network. Sustaining. Joyce Wallace, a famous actress, has been shot at. She's then attacked by a snake! Dick sings, "If I Knew You Were Coming, I'd Have Baked a Cake." Blake Edwards (writer), Charles Seel, Clarke Gordon, Dick Powell, Ed Begley, Edward King (announcer), Frances Robinson, Frank Worth (music director), Jack Kruschen, Joan Banks, Russell Hughes (director), Wilms Herbert. 29:37. April 5, 1950. "The Ivoy Statue" - NBC network. Sustaining. The program switches to Wednesdays at 10:00 P. M. A dying man gives Diamond a newspaper wrapped statue of "Kali" in a plot almost identical to "The Maltese Falcon!" Dick sings, "Bye Bye Baby" after the story. Dick Powell, Virginia Gregg, Wilms Herbert, Ed Begley, Edward King (announcer). 29:40.

DATE: Sat, 25 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.21 MB
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You Are There - Storming Of The Bastille (07-14-47)

Storming Of The Bastille (Aired July 13, 1947) You Are There is an American historical educational television and radio series broadcast over the CBS Radio and CBS Television networks. Created by Goodman Ace for CBS Radio, it blended history with modern technology, taking an entire network newsroom on a figurative time warp each week reporting the great events of the past. Reporters included John Charles Daly, Don Hollenbeck and Richard C. Hottelet. The series was first heard on July 7, 1947 under the title CBS Is There. Its final broadcast was on March 19, 1950 under the title You Are There. According to author/historian Martin Grams, actor Canada Lee was a guest in episodes 32 and 60. Martin Gabel appeared in character in episode 82. The first 23 broadcasts went under the title "CBS Is There" and beginning with episode 24, the title changed to "You Are There". A total of 90 episodes were broadcast. Only 75 episodes are known to exist in recorded form. The radio program made a transition to television in 1953, with Walter Cronkite as the regular host. Reporters included veteran radio announcers Dick Joy and Harlow Wilcox. The first telecast took place on February 1, 1953 and featured a re-enactment of the Hindenburg disaster. The final telecast took place on October 13, 1957. Originally telecast live, most of the later episodes were produced on film. One of the episodes, for instance, features actor Pat Conway as James J. Corbett, the boxer who fought champion John L. Sullivan in 1892. The series also featured various key events in American and World history, portrayed in dramatic recreations. Additionally, CBS News reporters, in modern-day suits, would report on the action and interview the protagonists of each of the historical episodes. Each episode would begin with the characters setting the scene. Cronkite, from his anchor desk in New York, would give a few words on what was about to happen. An announcer would then give the date and the event, followed by a loud and boldly spoken "You Are There!" At the end of the program, after Cronkite summarizes what happened in the preceding event, he reminded viewers, "What sort of day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times... and you were there." THIS EPISODE: July 13, 1947. CBS Radio Network - "Storming Of The Bastille" - On July 14, 1789, the mob, joined by some of the King's soldiers, stormed the Bastille. The commander, de Launay, attempted to surrender, but the mob would not accept it. He was killed as they poured through the gates. No guard was left alive. Later in the day the prisoners were released. There were only seven: two were convicted forgers; one was a loose-living aristocrat put in prison by his own father. Nevertheless it was a great symbolic event, one which is still celebrated in France every year.

DATE: Sat, 25 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.24 MB
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Clitheroe Kid - Two Sides To Every Story (02-09-69)

Two Sides To Every Story (Aired February 9, 1969) The Clitheroe Kid was James Robertson Clitheroe, Jimmy Clitheroe to most, who by some strange coincidence did come from the town of that name without having to change his family name! At his full height he was 4ft 3in, and played the naughty schoolboy from 1958 to 1972. Although plausable from a distance, he was not really able to pass himself off as a youngster close up, so a TV career did not really take off too well, but at the peak of his fame the radio show was raking in about 10 million listeners, although by the end this had dropped to a tenth of that figure. Clitheroe was a very private person, and the shows became a sort of escape for him, as well as the release from the worries of his diminutive size, but despite this, his popularity increased and increased, making this series one of the longer running on the radio - a total of 17 series. It is surprising then that with such a success, and with such a long run that the shows are rarely broadcast. The humour was very obvious and probably wouldn't stand up in today's climes, but there has been one release from the BBC radio collection, so if you wanted to hear some of the shows, you can hunt this down in the shops. I would like to thank Tony Lang for the following information about the series. I do not have any of this series on tape myself, so if anyone has comments to make I would be most grateful. The scripts were generally written by James Casey and Frank Roscoe, with the shows production by James Casey. The series sprang from a single show broadcast on 24-4-56 as part of a Variety Playhouse series The pilot series did not have individual names for the episodes. The producer was Geoff Lawrence, with the music supplied by the BBC Northern Dance Orchestra, conducted by Alyn Ainsworth, and broadcast in the North of England only.

DATE: Sat, 25 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.82 MB
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Arch Oboler's Plays - Mister Miller (10-04-45)

Mister Miller (Aired October 4, 1945) The Arch Oboler's Plays franchise aired in one form or another over a period of almost thirty-three years, counting the original canon of fifty-three new radioplays, the subsequent special canon of twenty-six radioplays for the Mutual Broadcasting System (1945), then a 1964 revival, and finally a 1971 revival. The original canon of scripts encompassed some ninety-plus original stories. And, as dyed in the wool Lights Out! fans will surely point out, a good number of Lights Out! stories were reprised among the Arch Oboler's Plays canon over the years as well. By the second year of Lights Out!, America was under the spell of the diminutive giant of a playwright, Archibald 'Arch' Oboler and his spellbinding, highly personalized writing style. While clearly a genius in his own right, it's also clear that much of his writing style had been informed by Wyllis Cooper at the least. Cooper's own writing style almost routinely employed a highly personalized point of view, so as to further attenuate the listening experience of his radioplays to the greatest degree. Given young Arch Oboler's close association with Cooper with Lights Out!, it's difficult to divorce Wyllis Cooper's writing style from Oboler's in many respects. There's no question that Oboler more than differentiated himself with his Arch Oboler's Plays seasons, but it's also quite clear that even after cranking out some sixty-seventy original radioplays for his own breakout dramatic franchise, that he was even then being influenced by his association with Wyllis Cooper. In addition, NBC at least, was making comparisons between its own wunderkind, Arch Oboler, and CBS' very own legend-in-the-making, Orson Welles. And while there's no question as to the respective genius of both young playwright-director-producers, we feel comfortable observing that perhaps NBC was stretching the point of comparison just a bit loosely. Forgetting to add 'dramatic actor' to the list of comparisons does more of a disservice to Welles than to Oboler. Not an inconsequential additional basis of comparison in the least, there's no question that Welles' added dimension--as an actor--informed everything else he produced, wrote, or directed for his entire career. THIS EPISODE: October 4, 1945. Mutual network. "Mr. Miller". Sustaining. A prize fight manager, played by Eddie Cantor, finally lands the ideal boxer, a man who could be the champ! Program #25 of a series of twenty six. Elliott Lewis, Julian Upton, William Johnstone, Irvin Lee, Lou Merrill, Sidney Miller, Jack Meakin (conductor), Eddie Cantor, Arch Oboler (host), Howard Duff, Leo Cleary, Lester Jay. 29:15.

DATE: Fri, 24 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.02 MB
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The New Adventures Of Michael Shayne - The Mail Order Murders (12-23-48)

The Mail Order Murders (Aired December 23, 1948) The feel of Michael Shayne over the years was arguably most noticeably evolved over Radio. Wally Maher's portrayal of Michael Shayne was not only the first over Radio, the longest running over Radio, but it was also the most fully developed over Radio. Aided by Cathy Lewis in her role of feisty bright Phyllis Knight, as well as by Joe Forte as Lieutenant Farraday, the family nature of the growing radio ensemble over the years put far more flesh on the bones of Brett Halliday's character than any other characterization that succeeded it. Maher's characterization of Shayne was so successful that for the remainder of Maher's career he actively translated Shayne's basic attributes into virtually every other detective or crime drama genre Maher appeared in until his untimely death in 1951. Those who've had the chance to compare his characterization of Mike Shayne to, for example his Lieutenant Riley from Let George Do It, can't help but notice the similarities. And why not. If you've got a popular gig, go with it. The public clearly couldn't get enough of it. Were it not for Maher's premature demise, one can well imagine Wally Maher having evolved into one of the greatest, most durable character actors of all time, much in the vein of Ken Christy for example. As with many West Coast ensemble productions of the era, Michael Shayne: Private Detective soon evolved into a very secure set of well-explored character arcs, among which Cathy Lewis' character, Phyllis Knight, found herself more and more integrated into the scripts. Joe Forte's Lieutenant Farraday continued to grow into the role as well. If you're noticing a great many parallels between what you're reading--perhaps for the first time--about Michael Shayne, you might notice the increasing similarities to Let George Do It or Yours, Truly Johnny Dollar. Just as with a good gig, if a good formula is continuing to produce audience loyalty once you find the right ensemble/concept/scripting mix, then you'll naturally wish to milk it for all it's worth. THIS EPISODE: December 23, 1948. Broadcaster's Guild syndication, AFRS rebroadcast. "The Case Of The Mail Order Murders". A murder letter and Demetrius, the organ grinder. Jeff Chandler, Jack Webb, William P. Rousseau (host, director), Brett Halliday (creator). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Fri, 24 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.93 MB
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The Blue Beetle - The Asylum Of Doctor Drear (09-04-40)

The Asylum Of Doctor Drear (Aired September 4, 1940) The exploits of Dan Garrett, a rookie patrolman who, by wearing bullet-proof blue chain mail, transformed himself into the mysterious Blue Beetle, a daring crusader for justice. The Blue Beetle was created by Charles Nicholas. The character made his first appearance in August of 1939 in the comic book Mystery Men #1, published by Fox Features Syndicate. The Blue Beetle radio serial aired from 05-15-40 to 09-13-40 as a CBS 30 minutes, syndicated series. Actor Frank Lovejoy provided the voice of the Blue Beetle for the first thirteen episodes. Later episodes were uncredited. After his father was killed by a gangster's bullet, young Dan Garrett joined the New York Police Department, but soon tired of the slow pace and red tape of police work. With the help of his friend and mentor, pharmacist and drug-store proprietor Dr. Franz, Dan acquired a costume of bullet-proof chain-mail-like cellulose material, and began a second life, fighting crime as The Blue Beetle. His calling card was a small beetle-shaped marker that he left in conspicuous places to alert criminals to his presence, using their fear of his crime fighting reputation as a weapon against them. For this purpose he also used a "Beetle Signal" flashlight. The Blue Beetle's reputation was not his only weapon -- he carried a revolver in a blue holster on his belt, and was sometimes shown wearing a multi-pouched belt after the style set by Batman. Also in the Batman vein, the Blue Beetle had a "BeetleMobile" car and a "BeetleBird" airplane. In at least one radio adventure, he carries something called a "magic ray machine". The ray machine was a sort of super-scientific cutting device. THIS EPISODE: September 4, 1940. Program #45. Fox Features syndication. "The Asylum Of Dr. Drear" Part one and two. Commercials added locally. The Blue Beetle is captured while trying to free a banker being kept imprisoned in an insane asylum. . 25:16

DATE: Thu, 23 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.66 MB
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Lights Out - He Dug It Up (02-09-43)

He Dug It Up (Aired February 9, 1943) Lights Out was created in Chicago by writer Wyllis Cooper in 1934, and the first series of shows (each 15 minutes long) ran on a local NBC station, WENR. By April 1934, the series was expanded to a half hour in length and moved to midnight Wednesdays. In January 1935, the show was discontinued in order to ease Cooper's workload (he was then writing scripts for the network's prestigious Immortal Dramas program), but was brought back by huge popular demand a few weeks later. After a successful tryout in New York City, the series was picked up by NBC in April 1935 and broadcast nationally, usually late at night and always on Wednesdays. Cooper stayed on the program until June 1936, when another Chicago writer, Arch Oboler, took over. By the time Cooper left, the series had inspired about 600 fan clubs. Cooper's run was characterized by grisly stories spiked with dark, tongue-in-cheek humor, a sort of radio Grand Guignol. A character might be buried or eaten or skinned alive, vaporized in a ladle of white-hot steel, absorbed by a giant slurping amoeba, have his arm torn off by a robot, tortured or decapitated -- always with the appropriate blood-curdling acting and sound effects. Adhesive tape, stuck together and pulled apart, simulated the sound of a man's skin being ripped off. Pulling the leg off a frozen chicken gave the illusion of an arm being torn out of its socket. A raw egg dropped on a plate stood in for an eye being gouged; poured corn syrup for flowing blood; cleavered cabbages and cantalopes for beheadings; snapped pencils and spareribs for broken fingers and bones. The sound of a hand crushed? A lemon, laid on an anvil, smashed with a hammer. Though there had been efforts at horror on radio previously, there had never been anything quite as explicit or outrageous as this on a regular basis. When the series switched to the national network, a decision was made to tone down the gore and emphasize tamer fantasy and ghost stories. THIS EPISODE: February 9, 1943. CBS network. "He Dug It Up". Sponsored by: Ironized Yeast, Molle Shaving Cream. An ancient stone coffin buried in the peaceful English countryside becomes an instrument of death. Inside the coffin is a woman with the head of a lion...and she's alive! Arch Oboler (writer, host), Frank Martin (commercial spokesman). 29:15.

DATE: Thu, 23 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.08 MB
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The Whistler - End Of The Road (12-02-51)

End Of The Road (Aired December 2, 1951) The Whistler is one of American radio's most popular mystery dramas, with a 13-year run from May 16, 1942 until September 22, 1955.The Whistler was the most popular West Coast-originated program with its listeners for many years. It was sponsored by the Signal Oil Company: "That whistle is your signal for the Signal Oil program, The Whistler." Each episode of The Whistler began with the sound of footsteps and a person whistling. (The Saint radio series with Vincent Price used a similar opening.) The haunting signature theme tune was composed by Wilbur Hatch and featured Dorothy Roberts performing the whistling with the orchestra. The stories followed an effective formula in which a person's criminal acts were typically undone either by an overlooked but important detail or by their own stupidity. On rare occasions a curious twist of fate caused the story to end happily for the episode's protagonist. Ironic twist endings were a key feature of each episode. The Whistler himself narrated, often commenting directly upon the action in the manner of a Greek chorus, taunting the criminal from an omniscient perspective. Bill Forman had the title role of host and narrator. Others who portrayed the Whistler at various times were Gale Gordon, Joseph Kearns, Marvin Miller (announcer for The Whistler and The Bickersons and later as Michael Anthony on TV's The Millionaire), Bill Johnstone (who had the title role on radio's The Shadow from 1938 to 1943) and Everett Clarke. Cast members included Hans Conried, Joseph Kearns, Cathy Lewis, Elliott Lewis, Gerald Mohr, Lurene Tuttle and Jack Webb. Writer-producer J. Donald Wilson established the tone of the show during its first two years, and he was followed in 1944 by producer-director George Allen. Other directors included Sterling Tracy and Sherman Marks with final scripts by Joel Malone and Harold Swanton. THIS EPISODE: December 2, 1951. CBS Pacific network. "End Of The Road". Sponsored by: Signal Oil. Steve Yeager is a killer from Seattle who has returned to his old girlfriend Doris Chandler for the $50,000 she's been keeping for him. Doris has a few plans of her own! Alice Reinheart, Ben Wright, Bill Forman (announcer), Bob Bruce, George W. Allen (producer), Herb Lytton, Jack Moyles, Marvin Miller, Norma Varden, Steve Hampton (writer), Wilbur Hatch (music). 29:48.

DATE: Thu, 23 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.91 MB
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Dimension X - The Man In The Moon (07-14-50)

The Man In The Moon (Aired July 14, 1950) Dimension X was first heard on NBC April 8, 1950, and ran until September 29, 1951. Strange that so little good science fiction came out of radio; they seem ideally compatible, both relying heavily on imagination. Some fine isolated science fiction stories were developed on the great anthology shows, Suspense and Escape. But until the premiere of Dimension X -- a full two decades after network radio was established -- there were no major science fiction series of broad appeal to adults. This show dramatized the work of such young writers as Ray Bradbury, Robert (Psycho) Bloch, Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and Kurt Vonnegut. In-house script writer was Ernest Kinoy, who adapted the master works and contributed occasional storied of his own. Dimension X was a very effective demonstration of what could be done with science fiction on the air. It came so late that nobody cared, but some of the stories stand as classics of the medium. Bradbury's "Mars Is Heaven" is as gripping today as when first heard. His "Martian Chronicles" was one of the series' most impressive offerings. Dimension X played heavily on an "adventures in time and space, told in future tense" theme. Actors who worked regularly on the show included Joe Di Santis, Wendell Holmes, Santos Ortega, Joseph Julian, Jan Miner, Roger De Koven, John Gibson, Ralph Bell, John Larkin, Les Damon, and Mason Adams. It was directed by Fred Weihe and Edward King. The deep-voiced narrator was Norman Rose. The series played heavily on the "X" factor in the title, as did X-Minus One a few years later. The signature was boomed out of and echo chamber as "DIMENSION X X X X X x x x x x . . . " Show Notes From OTRR Group THIS EPISODE: July 14, 1950. NBC network. "The Man In The Moon". Sponsored by: Wheaties. A colony on the far side of the moon is planning an invasion of the Earth. The script was subsequently used on "X Minus One" on May 29, 1955, and on "Future tense" during July, 1976. The "X Minus One" program was rebroadcast on "Monitor" during April, 1974. Luis Van Rooten, Santos Ortega, George Lefferts (writer), Van Woodward (producer), Norman Rose (host), Edward King (director), Bob Warren (announcer), Raymond Edward Johnson, Joe DeSantis, Larry Haines, Arthur Gary (announcer), Frank Martin (commercial spokesman). 29:28.

DATE: Wed, 22 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.83 MB
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Baby Snooks - 3 Episodes (02-22-40) (04-11-40) (09-12-40)

3 Episodes - "Missing Dollar" (02-22-40) "Baby Fish Story" (04-11-40) and "New Car" (09-12-40) FIRST BROADCAST: 29th February 1936 as part of The Ziegfield Follies of the Air LAST BROADCAST: 29th May 1951 CAST: Fanny Brice as Baby Snooks. Henley Stafford as Lancelot “Daddy” Higgins, Baby Snooks father. Lalive Brownell as “Mommy” Higgins (later played by Lois Corbet and Arlene Harris).Leone Ledoux as Snook’s little brother Roberspierre. ANNOUNCERS: John Conte (late 30s and early 40s). Tobe Reed (1944-45), Harlow Willcox (mid to late 1940s), Dick Joy, Don Wilson and Ken Wilson. VOCALIST: Bob Graham MUSIC: Meredith Willson (37-44), Carmen Dragon. PRODUCER-DIRECTORS: Mann Holiner (early 1940s), Al Kaye (1944), Ted Bliss, Walter Bunker, Arthur Stander. WRITERS: Phil Rapp, Jess Oppenheimer, Everett Freeman, Bill Danch, Sid Dorfman, Arthur Stander, Robert Fisher. SOUND EFFECTS: Clark Casey, David Light. Baby Snooks became a character for Fanny Brice at some point in the early 30s, nobody seems to know exactly when. What is for sure is that by 1934 Fanny was appearing on-stage in her baby costume as part of the Follies show on Broadway. In 1936, at 45 years of age, she used this baby persona to great effect on the CBS show The Ziegfield Follies of the Air and a radio legend was born. After various format and slot changes Snooks eventually got her very own show in 1944. Lalive Brownell took on the role of “Mommy” Higgins alongside the now well entrenched part of Lancelot “Daddy” Higgins played by Hanley Stafford. The half-an-hour slot was initially aired at 6:30pm on Sundays, but later to moved to an 8pm slot on Friday and then in Nov 1949 to an 8:30pm slot on Tuesday evenings. The shows revolved around the Snooks character creating vignettes through which the comedic potential of the Snooks chartacter could be fully exploited. Snooks specialized in making minor mishaps into major catastrophes and small parental disagreements into all out war. TODAY'S SHOW: Missing Dollar (02-22-40) Baby Fish Story (04-11-40) and New Car (09-12-40)

DATE: Wed, 22 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe - The Pigeons Blood (06-11-49)

The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe - The Pigeons Blood (Aired June 11, 1949) No one knows what the detectives thought of the production, but according to the New York Times review, Van Heflin did well but struggled with an awkward script. The reviewer thought the show depended too much on straight narration at dramatic moments instead of action or dialog. "Leaving ones play in the wings, as they say on Broadway, always makes for disconcerting theatre, and this was painfully true in the case of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe." Raymond Chandler wasn't enthralled by the show either. In a letter to Earl Stanley Gardner, author of the Perry Mason novels, Mr. Chandler said "It was thoroughly flat." This initial run of Philip Marlowe went from June 17 to September 19, 1947, with Pepsodent as the sponsor. The announcer was Wendell Niles, music was by Lyn Murray, and the producer was Jim Fonda. After the summer run ended, NBC dropped the show. As far as we know, only four episodes of this series have survived. The character of Philip Marlowe was too good to stay off stage for long though. A year later CBS decided to take a chance on reviving the show. Norman Macdonnell was producer/director; Gene Levitt, Robert Mitchell, Mel Dinelli, and Kathleen Hite wrote the scripts; and Richard Aurandt was responsible for the music. CBS cast Gerald Mohr to star as Philip Marlowe, with Roy Rowan as announcer. Philip Marlowe, being a loner, was really the only regular character, but throughout the three years the series ran a long string of high-quality supporting Hollywood actors appeared on the show. Performing alongside Mohr at various times were Jeff Corey, Howard McNear, Parley Baer, Lawrence Dobkin, Virginia Gregg, Gloria Blondell, and Lou Krugman. The CBS production ran from September 26, 1948 to September 29, 1950 with an additional short summer run from July 7 to September 15, 1951. THIS EPISODE: June 11, 1949. CBS network. "The Pigeon's Blood". Sustaining. Thirty rubies are missing, murder isn't! Gerald Mohr, Alma Lawton, Gloria Blondell, Barney Phillips, Edgar Barrier, Herb Butterfield, Raymond Chandler (creator), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), Mel Dinelli (writer), Robert Mitchell (writer), Gene Levitt (writer), Richard Aurandt (music), Roy Rowan (announcer). 29:45.

DATE: Wed, 22 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.25 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - Dynamite At Big Trestle (03-31-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - Dynamite At Big Trestle (Aired March 31, 1953) Broadcast constantly sometimes once a week sometimes 3 times a week By Mutual, between 1942 and 1956. Western Drama mainly for the young ones or maybe just the young at heart. I say the young at heart, because The Cisco Kid and his likeable but simple partner Pancho were a couple of lovable rogues and because there was usually a lovely senorita around in every episode who fell madly in love with Sisco, there may well have been an element of lady listeners included in the audience rating figures. Here they were, these two Mexican bandits, travelling from sunset to sunset (because that's where they always road off to at the end of each episode) robbing the rich, but I wouldn't say giving it to the poor. At least they did it in a kind and humorous way. It was more a question of the victim being relieved of the heavy burden of his or her riches, rather than having some of their prized possessions taken away from them. Half the fun in the series was listening to Pancho try to explain in his simple Mexican way that the sheriff's posse was hard on their heels and to quote him, "Ceesco, eef they catch up with us, perhaps they weel keel us." At the beginning The Cisco Kid was played by Jackson Beck then later Jack Mather took over the role. Whilst Pancho was played first by Louis Sorin then by Harry Lang. Originally the Announcer was Michael Rye and the Director Jock McGregor and during the days of Jack Mather and Harry Lang the Producer was J. C. Lewis with the series being written by Larry Hays. THIS EPISODE: March 31, 1953 - Program #73. Mutual-Don Lee network origination, Ziv syndication. "Dynamite At Big Trestle". Commercials added locally. Two Eastern badmen hiding out in the West disocver a vein of glacial ice under a field. They're determined to kill Cisco, wreck a train and take the ice-filled property from a beautiful senorita. Jack Mather, Harry Lang. 26:41.

DATE: Tue, 21 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.28 MB
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21st Precinct - The Mainliner (08-18-53)

The Mainliner (Aired August 18, 1953) 21st Precinct was one of the realistic police drama series of the early- to mid-1950's that were aired in the wake of DRAGNET. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operation of a single police precinct. Actual cases were used as the basis for stories. "21st Precinct.., It's just lines on a map of the city of New York. Most of the 173,000 people wedged into the nine-tenths of a square mile between Fifth Avenue and the East River wouldn't know, if you asked them, that they lived or worked in the 21st. Whether they know it or not, the security of their persons, their homes, and their property is the job of the men of the 21st." The Precinct Captain acted as the narrator for the series.The official title of the series according to the series scripts and the CBS series promotional materials was 21ST PRECINCT and not TWENTY-FIRST PRECINCT or TWENTY FIRST PRECINCT which appears in many Old-Time Radio books. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operations of a single police precinct. Actual cases would be used as the basis for stories. It was mentioned in each episode's closing by the announcer that, "Twenty-firstPrecinct is presented with the official cooperation of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association an organization of more than 20,000 members of the Police Department, City of New York."

DATE: Tue, 21 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.60 MB
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The Devil & Mr. O - Alley Cat (09-17-71)

Alley Cat (Aired September 17, 1971) With its premiere on the nationwide NBC hookup in 1935, Lights Out was billed "the ultimate in horror." Never had such sounds been heard on the air. Heads rolled, bones were crushed, people fell from great heights and splattered wetly on pavement. There were garrotings, choking, heads split by cleavers, and, to a critic at Radio Guide, "the most monstrous of all sounds, human flesh being eaten." Few shows had ever combined the talents of actors and imaginative writers so well with the graphic art of the sound technician. Wyllis Cooper, who created, wrote, and produced it, was then a 36-year-old staffer in Chicago's NBC Studios. Cooper created his horror "by raiding the larder." For the purposed of Lights Out sound effects, people were what they ate. The sound of a butcher knife rending a piece of uncooked pork was, when accompanied by shrieks and screams, the essence of murder to a listener alone at midnight. Real bones were broken - spareribs snapped with a pipe wrench. Bacon in a frypan gave a vivid impression of a body just electrocuted. And the cannibalism effect was actually a zealous actor. Gurgling and smacking his lips as he slurped up a bowl of spaghetti. Cabbages sounded like human heads when chopped open with a cleaver, and carrots had the pleasant resonance of fingers being lopped off. Arch Oboler's celebrated tale of a man turned inside-out by a demonic fog was accomplished by soaking a rubber glove in water and stripping it off at the microphone while a berry basket was curshed at the same instant. The listener saw none of this. The listener saw carnage and death. Cooper left the show in 1936 and Oboler was given the job. Oboler lost no time establishing himself as the new master of the macabre. Between May 1936 and July 1938, he wrote and directed more than 100 Lights Out plays. To follow Cooper was a challenge: he was "the unsung pioneer of radio dramatic techniques," but Oboler had passed the test with his first play. His own name soon became synonymous with murder and gore, though horror as a genre had always left him cold. Oboler aspired to more serious writing. Oboler's shows are well represented -- this series of Lights Out was syndicated in The Devil and Mr. O offerings of 1970 - 73. A transcribed syndication of original broadcasts from 1942 - 43 with Arch Oboler as the host. Show Notes From the OTR Researcher's Group

DATE: Tue, 21 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.81 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Six Shooter" - Gabriel Starbuck (11-22-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Six Shooter" - Gabriel Starbuck (Aired November 22, 1953) Though The Six Shooter wasn't the first popular adult western to air over Radio, a case can be made that it was the first to thoroughly legitimize the genre over the medium. Not only were The Six Shooter scripts--and casts--the equal of any of the first wave of adult westerns to air over Radio, but the series carried the considerable weight of James Stewart in the starring role as Britt Ponset, the reluctant, yet highly efficient, western gunslinger. For the era, James Stewart was a natural choice to popularize the genre over Radio. His ground-breaking--for Stewart--depiction of the angst and inner turmoil of his protagonist, Lin McAdam in Winchester '73 (1950), launched a series of James Stewart appearances in other taut Anthony Mann and Alfred Hitchcock psychological thrillers over the following ten years. More importantly, the timing was perfect to cast Stewart in a psychological western thriller for Radio. Stewart's extraordinary performance in Anthony Mann's twisty Winchester '73 (1950) was the most popular break-out rendition of the adult western genre in Film for its time. While the film is more about the elusive one-in-a-thousand Winchester rifle, the film also focuses on the various transformations that Stewart's Lin McAdam undergoes in his quest to recapture his fairly won prize, a rare, one of a kind--for its day-- .44 caliber Winchester Model 1873. Stewart followed up his performance in Winchester '73 with appearances as Tom Jeffords in Broken Arrow (1950), as Glyn McKlyntock in Bend In The River (1952), as Marsh 'Carbine' Williams in Carbine Williams (1952), and as Howard Kemp in The Naked Spur (1953). But it was the three Anthony Mann features, Winchester '73, Bend In The River, and The Naked Spur, that genuinely popularized James Stewart as a thinking man's adult western protagonist; at once resolute in his varying quests for justice, but at the same time fraught with conflicted angst over his means' to those ends. Mann and Stewart subsequently teamed for two more adult westerns, The Far Country (1954) and The Man From Laramie (1955). Popular Film images of James Stewart the cowboy still fresh in the minds of contemporary audiences, Stewart would seem to have been the odd-on favorite to popularize the adult western genre over Radio. But there were two major hurdles to jump to coax Jimmy Stewart into an adult western Radio series: Jimmy Stewart's extraordinary recent popularity--and demand--as an adult western Film star, and finding the time in Jimmy Stewart's incredibly busy schedule to mount the thiry-nine episodes of the Radio production. THIS EPISODE: November 22, 1953. NBC network. Sustaining. "Gabe Starbuck is getting too old to be the sheriff any more, and the town thinks the job should go to a younger man. Then...the bank is robbed. Jimmy Stewart, Frank Burt (creator), Basil Adlam (music), Jack Johnstone (director), Herb Vigran, John Stevenson, William Johnstone, Hal Gibney (announcer), Lamont Johnson, Dal McKinnon. 29:47.

DATE: Tue, 21 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.70 MB
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The Creaking Door - Where The Dead Sleep (1950)

Where The Dead Sleep (1950) *Exact Date Is Unknown The Creaking Door was South African Radio's attempt to create a compelling program of highly suspenseful, dramatic thrillers with a supernatural bent for their sponsor, State Express Cigarettes. Some commentators insist it was conceived as a spin-off of the already successful Inner Sanctum episodes that had been syndicated for broadcast in Australia and South Africa during the 1950s. Given the format, one can see the inference, but in fact The Creaking Door stands on its own as a unique, well-produced, engaging supernatural thriller series on its own merit. The etymology of the name, The Creaking Door, bears some reflection. When legendary producer and director, Himan Brown first presented Inner Sanctum as one of three requested sponsorship candidates to Carter Products, he presented Inner Sanctum as The Creaking Door. Carter didn't care for the name, so on the spur of the moment Hi Brown suggested Inner Sanctum as an alternative, and voila, Radio history was made. The emphasis on high production values is perhaps the very reason that several early, morally challenged Radio traders felt they could get away with interspersing many of the Creaking Door episodes with their Inner Sanctum, Mysterious Traveler, and Strange Dr. Weird offerings to a still naive community of radio recording collectors. Although somewhat left-handed, it's still a compliment to both SABC and Springbok Radio that those early 'otr hooligans' managed to get away with the practice for well over 20 years. That takes nothing away from this excellent series in its own right. The expositions were deftly introduced and shaded with just the right amount of chilling narrative. Not quite as chilling and melodramatic as Raymond Johnson, perhaps, but Peter Broomfield rightly camped up his delivery for The Creaking Door, and it worked. Indeed, given the reported conservative budget of each episode, it's a tribute to The Creaking Door's producers that they managed to tease so much quality out of such relatively humbly funded productions. Circulating The Creaking Door productions remain a highly engaging tribute to the supernatural thriller genre and, as such, continue to be a highly sought after series. Definitely still a compelling, 'lights-out' listening experience for young and old alike. Notes From The Digital-Deli

DATE: Mon, 20 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.92 MB
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The Bob Hope Pepsodent Show - Guest Is Lana Turner (04-13-48)

Guest Is Lana Turner (Aired April 13, 1948) From the age of twelve, Bob Hope worked at a wide variety of odd jobs at a local board walk. When not doing this he would busk, doing dance and comedy patter to make extra money. He entered many dancing and amateur talent contests, and won prizes for his impersonation of Charlie Chaplin. He also boxed briefly and unsuccessfully under the name Packy East, making it once as far as the semi-finals of the Ohio novice championship. Fallen silent film comedian Fatty Arbuckle saw one of his performances and in 1925 got him steady work with Hurley's Jolly Follies. A year later Hope had formed an act called the Dancemedians with George Burns (who would also live to see his own 100th birthday) and the Hilton Sisters, conjoined twins who had a tap dancing routine. Hope and his partner George Byrne had an act as a pair of Siamese twins as well, and both danced and sang while wearing blackface before friends advised Hope that he was funnier as himself.. After five years on the Vaudeville circuit, by his own account Hope was surprised and humbled when he and his partner Grace Louise Troxell failed a 1930 screen test for Pathé at Culver City, California. (Hope had been on the screen in small parts, 1927's The Sidewalks of New York and 1928's Smiles. Hope returned to New York City and subsequently appeared in several Broadway musicals including Roberta, Say When, the 1936 Ziegfeld Follies, and Red, Hot and Blue with Ethel Merman. His performances were generally well-received and critics noted his keen sense of comedic timing. He changed his name from "Leslie" to "Bob", reportedly because people in the US were calling him "Hopelessly", although in the 1920s he sometimes used the name "Lester Hope". THIS EPISODE: The Pepsodent Show. April 13, 1948. "Special Guest Is Lana Turner" - NBC network, KFI, Los Angeles aircheck. Sponsored by: Pepsodent ("Ballpoint Pocket Perfumer" premium). I Remmember Mama" (movie) local. The program originates from Hollywood High School, the alma mater of guest Lana Turner. Jerry Colonna sings, "I Love You." Bob and Lana are back in High School. Bob Hope, Wendell Niles (announcer), Les Brown and His Orchestra, Eileen Wilson, Jerry Colonna, Barbara Jo Allen (as "Vera Vague"), Hy Averback, Lana Turner. 29:10.

DATE: Mon, 20 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.97 MB
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Screen Director's Playhouse - Rope Of Sand (04-28-50)

Rope Of Sand (Aired April 28, 1950) Screen Director's Playhouse is NBC's answer to Lux Theater and Screen Guild Players, both prosperous ventures on CBS. The rehash of old movies doesn't necessarily make the most vivid of radio plays but there seems to be no doubt that it attracts listeners by the hundredweight. And association with America's citadel of glamor lures the unsuspecting by the sheer weight of publicity. In this case, the association with Hollywood is even more tenuous than usual. The screen director, who figures so prominently in the title, has very little to do with the program beyond appearing briefly at the beginning to explain why he thought, say, "Jezebel" was a marvelous picture--a rather difficult thing to explain--and later he bobs up again at the end to exchange banter with the star, an exchange that generally takes the form of a barrage of mutual compliments. Uusually the same star that appeared in the movie shows up on the radio play, not all of them to great advantage. The dramas themselves range from very good to very painful, a wide range. One of the best was "Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House", with Cary Grant again discovering that dream houses are extraordinarily expensive. It was a very witty piece on a contemporary problem. Also, Grant is one of the few actors as effective in radio as he is in pictures, possessing, as he does, a distinctive voice that could be recognized at thirty paces anywhere from Malay to Afghanistan. A Less Appealing A LESS selection for this program was "Jezebel" in which Bette Davis flared like a brush fire to the accompaniment of mid-nineteenth century sound effects. The NBC Presents and NBC Theater Presents initiatives throughout the Golden Age of Radio represented NBC's 'signature' productions. Along with their NBC University of The Air and NBC Inter-American University of The Air initiatives, the defining characteristics of most of these, for the most part, network-sustained productions were their quality, historical accuracy, and attention to the smallest detail. THIS EPISODE: April 28, 1950. NBC network. "Rope Of Sand". Sponsored by: RCA. A story of diamond hunting in the "forbidden area" of South Africa, complicated by love and revenge. Bill Cairn (director), Burt Lancaster, Corinne Calvet, Donald Morrison, Frank Barton (announcer), Howard Wiley (producer), Jimmy Wallington (announcer), Milton Geiger (adaptor), Norman Field, Robert Armbruster (conductor), Stan Waxman, William Dieterle, William Johnstone. 29:18.

DATE: Mon, 20 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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The Fat Man - The 19th Pearl (01-21-46)

The 19th Pearl (Aired January 21, 1946) "There he goes across the street into the drugstore, steps on the scale, height: 6 feet, weight: 290 pounds, fortune: Danger. Who isit? THE FAT MAN." Brad Runyon was the Fat Man, played by Jack Scott Smart. The series was created by Dashall Hammott and was first heard on the ABC network Jan. 21, 1946. J. Scott Smart fit the part of the Fat Man perfectly, weighing in at 270 pounds himself. When he spoke, there was no doubt that this was the voice of a big guy. Smart gave a witty, tongue-in-cheek performance and helped make THE FAT MAN one of the most popular detective programs on the air. Smart also appeared in The March Of Time (early 1930s), the Theater Guild On The Air, Blondie, The Fred Allen Show, and The Jack Benny Program. There was also an version made in Australia, syndicated on the Artansa lable, about 1954. There are at least 36 shows available from vendors. The Australian Fat Man was played possibly by Lloyd Berrell. Although not featuring J. Scott Smart, who really fit the part, the series is quite good. THIS EPISODE: July 22, 1949. ABC network origination, CBC rebroadcast. "Murder Is The Medium". Sponsored by: Pepto Bismol. A ten-inch knife cuts a murder during a seance and later a poisoning or two leads the Fat Man to the killer. The middle commercial has been deleted. J. Scott Smart. 1/2 hour. THIS EPISODE: January 21, 1946. ABC network. "The Nineteenth Pearl". Sustaining. The first show of the series. A good adventure that starts with a beautiful stranger in Grand Central Terminal. J. Scott Smart, Robert Sloane (director), Dashiell Hammett (author), Bernard Green (music director). 29:40.

DATE: Mon, 20 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.34 MB
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Rocky Fortune - Murder Among The Statues (12-01-53)

Murder Among The Statues (Aired December 1, 1953) As hard is it may be to believe by today's standards, Rocky Fortune was Frank Sinatra's only dramatic Radio program from The Golden Age of Radio as the lead in a recurring role. As a variety guest performer, Sinatra's Radiography goes on and on and on. But this was the program that a great many of the growing number of fans of Sinatra's acting work really wanted to hear. NBC spared no expense to showcase this growing super-star of the 1940s and 1950s, and it shows in both production values and supporting voice talent. Frank Sinatra seemed very comfortable in the role of Rocco Fortunato--'Rocky Fortune'--and the scripts that George Lefferts and Ernest Kinoy wrote for Sinatra made for some fascinating adventures. The role was clearly written specifically for him, and more importantly for the more 'adult' persona his agents and publicity reps were trying to portray of him at this point in his career. He'd already done the teen and 20-something idol gig, and he had been expressing more of an interest in dramatic work. Perhaps Sinatra's managers were simply hedging their bets. Sinatra's greatest initial dramatic role in From Here To Eternity was released October 19, 1953, just weeks after Rocky Fortune began its 26-week run on NBC. As we all know now, From Here to Eternity was a box-office smash, propelling Sinatra into a whole new career in Film. Thus, as with Alan Ladd in his Mayfair Productions program, Box-13, Sinatra--and Las Vegas and Hollywood--found a far greater immediate demand for his talent on stage and in Film. The Big-Screen's gain was Radio's loss. Compounding any hope of a second season of Rocky Fortune, Ava Gardner's movie Mogambo was also released on October 9, 1953. Thus, both Frank Sinatra's and Ava Gardner's careers were approaching critical junctures--a publicists dream, but rapidly dimming any possibility for a continuation of Rocky Fortune, or any other such Radio vehicle for Frank Sinatra. NBC had auditioned two other such detective genre vehicles for Sinatra--'Frankie Galahad, Private Detective', and an Erle Stanley Gardner series. Some intriguing prospects to be sure. If only . . . .Rocco Fortunato was a young New Yorker on his way up and out of the endless dead-end jobs his employment agency was sending him on, like the oyster-shucking job they sent him to that yielded only a handful of 'clams' for his efforts--but a bonus of 12 big hot pearls in the bargain. And much as Alan Ladd's character in Box 13, Rocky Fortune was clearly ready for a more vibrant, exciting, and financially rewarding career change. :THIS EPISODE: December 1, 1953. "Murder Among The Statues" - NBC network. Sustaining. Rocky is working for an art dealer, when a statue becomes green. This is very interesting to a wealthy collector. This is a network version. Frank Sinatra, Jan Miner, Joseph Julian, Ed Begley, Ted Osborne, Leon Janney, Mandel Kramer, Ernest Kinoy (writer), Fred Weihe (director), Ray Barrett (announcer). 24:36.

DATE: Sun, 19 Sep 2010
SIZE: 4.47 MB
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ABC Mystery Time - Half An Hour (08-02-56)

Half An Hour (Aired August 2, 1956) ABC Mystery Time was hosted by Don Dowd and starred Sir Laurence Olivier. Great special effects will grab your attention, accented by creepy organ rips. Stories are offered such as death gathered round a card table at a local chapter of The Suicide Club, or a man who desperately tries to hire a 24 hour bodyguard all the while trying to make himself the victim of a murder, and other baffling peculiar tales of yore. Also known as Mystery Time and Mystery Time Classics, this one is sure to excite and mystify. Unfortunately this is an old time radio show with few surviving episodes in existence. THIS EPISODE: August 2, 1956 - ABC network. "Half-An-Hour". A woman leaves her husband to live in Egypt with her lover, who is accidentally killed before they depart. The body of the show only, the story is complete. The date is approximate. The program is also known as, "Mystery Time Classics," "Mystery Time" and "Masters Of Mystery." James M. Barrie (author), Don Dowd (host), Ralph Richardson (host, performer). 22:10.

DATE: Sun, 19 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.87 MB
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Defense Attorney - Client - Joseph Morelano (04-17-52)

Client - Joseph Morelano (Aired April 17, 1952) Playing radio's last lady crime fighter was a prominent actress, Mercedes McCambridge. The series began on NBC under the title "The Defense Rests" in the spring of 1951. NBC soon dropped it so ABC picked it up, kept the same cast, re-titled it :"Defense Attorney" and aired it from August 1951 to December 1952. McCambridge, portraying an attorney named Martha Ellis Bryant, spent virtually no time in the courtroom and instead was in the streets, solving crimes and mysteries. She was assisted by her boy friend, Jud Barnes, a reporter, played by Howard Culver (whose "Straight Arrow" series had just gone off the air.) Six episodes of the ABC series and one of the NBC version have survived and all attest to the excellent writing, good acting, and fast pace of a well-done adventure show. When Attorney Bryant solved her last case on 12-30-52, it brought down the curtain on OTR's lady crime fighters. THIS EPISODE: April 17, 1952. ABC network. Sustaining. "Client - Joseph Morelano" - After 12 years, a new trial for a convicted murderer. Tony Barrett, Tom McKee, Joel Nessler, Rex Koury (composer, conductor), Dwight Hauser (director), Joel Murcott (writer), Howard Culver, George Pirrone, Mercedes McCambridge, Irene Tedrow. 29:34.

DATE: Sat, 18 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.80 MB
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The Couple Next Door - 2 Episodes (01-17-58) (01-21-58)

2 Episodes "Flying To New York" (01-17-58) and "Book Borrowing" (01-21-58) Ethel and Albert (aka The Private Lives of Ethel and Albert) was a radio and television comedy series about a married couple, Ethel and Albert Arbuckle, living in the small town of Sandy Harbor. Created by Peg Lynch (born 1916), who scripted and portrayed Ethel, the series first aired on local Minnesota radio in the early 1940s, followed by a run on NBC, CBS and ABC from May 29, 1944 to August 28, 1950. Radio historian Gerald Nachman (in Raised on Radio) called the show "insightful and realistic... a real leap forward in domestic comedy--a lighthearted, clever, well-observed, daily 15-minute show about the amiable travails of a recognizable suburban couple" which combined "the domestic comedy of a vaudeville-based era with a keen modern sensibility. Lynch made her comic points without stooping to female stereotypes, insults, running gags, funny voices or goofy plots." The Couple Next Door was a similar Peg Lynch radio series which aired 1953-57 on Chicago's WGN, moving to the Mutual Broadcasting System in the summer of 1957. The married couple was played by Olan Soule and Elinor Harriot. It was revived on CBS Radio (December 30, 1957-November 25, 1960) with Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce as the married couple. Essentially, it reprised Ethel and Albert, but the new name was necessitated because Lynch had long since lost the rights to the original title. The CBS iteration was named "Best Daytime Radio Program" for 1959 by The National Association for Better Radio and Television. That still wasn't the end. Lynch and Bunce brought the program to NBC's weekend programming block Monitor in 1963, performing three- to four-minute vignettes not unlike the original 15-minute shows. Their presence continued a Monitor tradition of offering new material from classic radio favorites (including James and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly fame, until Marian Jordan's death). Lynch returned yet again in the 1970s with a syndicated radio feature known as The Little Things in Life. Very few of the original Ethel and Albert radio programs are known to have survived, but almost all of the CBS Couple Next Door episodes exist. The Ethel and Albert television series was launched on NBC (April 25, 1953-December 25, 1954). It moved to CBS (June 20, 1955-September 26, 1955) as a summer replacement for December Bride and ended its television life on ABC (October 14, 1955-July 6, 1956). Several episodes of the television version survive at the UCLA Film and Television Archive. TODAY'S SHOW: 2 Episodes "Flying To New York" (01-17-58) and "Book Borrowing" (01-21-58)

DATE: Sat, 18 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.71 MB
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Crime Classics - My Name Is Jack The Ripper (06-30-54)

My Name Is Jack The Ripper (Aired June 30, 1954) To characterize Crime Classics as a 'docudrama' stretches the point to bursting. From the fictional 'expert' host to the program titles, it's clear that Elliott Lewis very much intended this project to be a tongue-in-cheek send up of some of history's most notorious and infamous crimes. Indeed, it's obvious that given the over-the-top violence depicted in each of the program's accounts, there was no better palatable way to portray them during the 'family values' sensibilities of the 1950s. Even more obvious are the often apocryphal and anecdotal details used to frame many of these notorious crimes. Though ostensibly "adapted from the original court reports and newspaper accounts," it's quite clear that they were scripted more for entertainment, than for a college classroom--but entertaining they definitely were, and remain. This was a very busy time for Elliott Lewis. Lewis had launched his Cathy & Elliott Lewis On Stage program in January of 1953. Halfway through its run, Crime Classics and Cathy and Elliott Lewis On Stage were heard back-to-back in CBS's lineup for much of Crime Classics' run, in most markets. Indeed, for the Crime Classics program, The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, which aired December 9, 1953 outside of California, Lewis chose to re-enact the play, 'Our American Cousin' for the Cathy and Elliott Lewis On Stage program, immediately following. Though clearly a brilliant segue for On Stage that night, it's anecdotally reported that the combination met with disfavor from no less than William S. Paley himself. We find this doubtful since this was clearly brilliant programming, but the anecdote stands. Given Paley's somewhat infamous and quixotic reputation, one supposes it might be true --but. . . .Elliott Lewis directed his future second wife, Mary Jane Croft in twelve of the Crime Classics programs, beginning with the audition and premiere script, The Crime of Bathsheba Spooner. Elliott Lewis would continue working with Mary Jane Croft in Cathy and Elliott Lewis On Stage and several other Radio and Television productions over the years. At the time Cathy and Elliott Lewis' marriage finally dissolved in 1958, they were referred to as CBS's "Mr. and Mrs. Radio." Elliott Lewis married Mary Jane Croft the following year. THIS EPISODE: June 30, 1954. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "Good Evening, My Name Is Jack The Ripper". The story of the activities of the famed British slasher, as seen through the eyes of a young lass. The last show of the series. AFRTS program name: "Mystery Theater." The AFRTS version omits the opening scene. AFRTS broadcast date: November 11, 1973. Betty Harford, D. J. Thompson, Irene Tedrow, Ben Wright, Paula Winslowe, James McCallion, Richard Peel, Roy Rowan (announcer), David Friedkin (writer), Elliott Lewis (producer, director), Bernard Herrmann (composer, conductor), Lou Merrill (host), Morton Fine (writer). 25 minutes.

DATE: Fri, 17 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.22 MB
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Philo Vance - Argyle Murder Case (06-27-50)

Argyle Murder Case (Aired June 27, 1950) S.S. Van Dine's Philo Vance remains arguably the most aristocratic of the popular Gentleman Detectives of the modern era of Detective Fiction. He clearly possessed every bit of the arrogance of Sherlock Holmes, Gregory Hood, and even Ellery Queen. But one counter that, as an aristocrat with no lack of self-confidence, at the very least he wasn't hobbled by either cocaine addiction or an overbearing father. Indeed he's arguably most like Gregory Hood in many aspects of his basic personality. His other possible rival, Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe, clearly possessed every bit of the requisite arrogance of this class of private--or Gentleman--detective, but Nero Wolfe was also hobbled by his inherent agorophobia, proclivity for habitual excess, and murky background. Philo Vance, by contrast, possessed no apparent excessive proclivities, other than his continually overbearing self-confidence, arrogance, and smugness. But let's be honest here. We don't expect protagonists of this level of deductive, analytical genius to be people we'd either want to have a beer with, or pal around with to any degree. What we do expect from them is to continue to think outside-the-box in solving some of the most vexing and fascinating mysteries, murders, and mayhem in modern Detective Fiction History. Thirteen Philo Vance feature films captured the attention of audiences for almost 20 years during The Golden Age of Radio. Indeed, an argument can be made that the Philo Vance we hear in the various Radio series' of Philo Vance mysteries isn't quite the arrogant cur we read about or watch on Film. But neither is he a very lovable character in his Radio incarnation. The actors that depicted Philo Vance throughout this series of three distinct productions all share a very unique gift for portraying both Philo Vance's inherent arrogance and self-assuredness, while somehow allowing just enough room to be poked fun at from time to time by his freinds or casual love interests. Notes From The Digital Deli THIS EPISODE: June 27, 1950 - Program #69. ZIV Syndication. "The Argyle Murder Case". Commercials added locally. An actor's dead body is found on a ferryboat. The body has on all new clothes...and argyle socks that don't match. Jackson Beck. 27:07.

DATE: Fri, 17 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.01 MB
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Nightfall - The Jogger (04-16-82)

The Jogger (Aired April 16, 1982) Nightfall is a radio drama series produced and aired by CBC Radio from July 1980 to June 1983. While primarily a supernatural/horror series, Nightfall featured some episodes in other genres, such as science fiction, mystery, fantasy, and human drama. One episode was even adapted from a folk song by Stan Rogers. Some of Nightfall's episodes were so terrifying that the CBC registered numerous complaints and some affiliate stations dropped it. Despite this, the series went on to become one of the most popular shows in CBC Radio history, running 100 episodes that featured a mix of original tales and adaptations of both classic and obscure short stories. Nightfall was the brainchild of producer Bill Howell, who was best known at the time for his work on CBC Playhouse and the cult favorite adventure series, Johnny Chase: Secret Agent of Space. (Howell later went on to be executive producer of CBC Radio's highly-popular series, The Mystery Project, which ran from 1992 to 2004.) When CBC Radio was revamped and given an expanded budget in 1980, Howell approached the newly-appointed Head of Radio Drama, Susan Rubes, about his idea for a supernatural/horror anthology series that would push the envelope. Though not a fan of the horror genre, Rubes recognized a hit when she saw one and gave Howell the green light to begin production. Bill Howell served as Executive Producer of Nightfall at CBC Toronto for the first two seasons. The reins were passed for the third season to veteran CBC Radio producer Don Kowalchuk (Doctor Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine Show) at CBC Vancouver. Nightfall featured two hosts during its run. The Toronto years (1980–1982) were hosted by "the mysterious Luther Kranst", a character created by Bill Howell's devious imagination and played by character actor Henry Ramer. For its Vancouver run (1982–1983), Don Kowalchuk worked with voice actor Bill Reiter to develop the character of Frederick Hende. THIS EPISODE: April 16, 1982. Program #59. CBC network, Toronto origination. "The Jogger". A good story about a 48-year-old man who pushes his body into shape...to keep up with, The Jogger. John Stocker (triples), Melleny Brown, Neil Dainard, Alan Fawcett, John Granik, John Jessop (recording engineer), Bill Robinson (sound effects), Nancy McElvene (production assistant), Bill Howell (producer, director, executive producer), Henry Ramer (host), Linda Sorenson, Tony Bell (writer). 27:11.

DATE: Fri, 17 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.95 MB
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The Abbott & Costello Show - Football Game With Harold Peary (01-20-44)

Football Game With Harold Peary (Aired January 20, 1944) Abbott and Costello William (Bud) Abbott and Lou Costello (born Louis Francis Cristillo) were an American comedy duo whose work in radio, film and television made them one of the most popular teams in the history of comedy. Thanks to the endurance of their most popular and influential routine, "Who's on First?"---whose rapid-fire word play and comprehension confusion set the preponderant framework for most of their best-known routines---the team are also the only comedians known to have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Bud Abbott was born in Asbury Park, NJ, October 2, 1897 and died April 24, 1974 in Woodland Hills, California. Lou Costello was born in Paterson, NJ, March 6, 1906 and died March 3, 1959 in East Los Angeles, California. After working as Allen's summer replacement, Abbott and Costello joined Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy on The Chase and Sanborn Hour in 1941, while two of their films (Buck Privates and Hold That Ghost) were adapted for Lux Radio Theater. They launched their own weekly show October 8, 1942, sponsored by Camel cigarettes. The Abbott and Costello Show mixed comedy with musical interludes (usually, by singers such as Connie Haines, Marilyn Maxwell, the Delta Rhythm Boys, Skinnay Ennis, and the Les Baxter Singers). Regulars and semi-regulars on the show included Artie Auerbrook, Elvia Allman, Iris Adrian, Mel Blanc, Wally Brown, Sharon Douglas, Verna Felton, Sidney Fields, Frank Nelson, Martha Wentworth, and Benay Venuta. Ken Niles was the show's longtime announcer, doubling as an exasperated foil to Abbott & Costello's mishaps (and often fuming in character as Costello insulted his on-air wife routinely); he was succeeded by Michael Roy, with announcing chores also handled over the years by Frank Bingman and Jim Doyle. THIS EPISODE: January 20, 1944. "Football Game With Harold Peary" - Red network, KFI, Los Angeles aircheck. Sponsored by: Camels, Prince Albert Tobacco. Costello takes on "The Great Gildersleeve," on and off the fottball field. Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Harold Peary, Elvia Allman, Arthur Q. Bryan, Ken Niles (announcer), Freddie Rich and His Orchestra, Connie Haines. 29:19.

DATE: Fri, 17 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.84 MB
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The Casebook Of Gregory Hood - The Red Capsule (07-22-46)

The Red Capsule (Aired July 22, 1946) In The Casebook of Gregory Hood the spokesperson was initially the legendary and versatile Radio talent, Harry Bartell. The incorporation of a sponsor's spokesperson into the ensemble cast wasn't ground-breaking for the genre. Petri had introduced their flavor of the format with their first sponsorship of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes over MBS in October 1943 and for the three following years immediately preceding their sponsorship of The Casebook of Gregory Hood. But this wasn't the earliest product placement innovation in Radio. Burns and Allen had woven their various sponsors' products into their earliest scripts, as had Bob Hope with his sponsors, Jack Benny with his sponsors, and Fred Allen with his. The format, at least under Harry Bartell's watch, was seamlessly intertwined into each script, as well as even more complementary and entertaining for Bartell's contribution. The introductions completed, Harry Bartell would inquire as to the casebook adventure for the evening. Sandy or Gregory would frame the adventure and launch into the scripted mystery. One out of context sponsor break would occur at the midpoint of the script, with Bartell transitioning into a recap of the continuing adventure. At each adventure's completion, Hood, Taylor and Bartell would segue into Petri's outgoing message, then conversationally introduce the following adventure. The prologue byplay would often commence at a noted eatery in San Francisco--presumably one that stocked vast quantities of Petri Wines in its cellars. Such remote location intros were invariably in keeping with the upscale nature of the production's back story. THIS EPISODE: July 22, 1946. Mutual network. "The Red Capsule". Sponsored by: Petri Wine. While camping in the mountains, a woman takes an "Efedrin" tablet, which turns out to be poison! Gregory Hood and his friend report the death, but find themselves arrested for murder! The system cue has been deleted. Gale Gordon, Harry Bartell (announcer), Denis Green (writer), Anthony Boucher (writer), William Bakewell, Dean Fosler (composer, conductor). 29:25.

DATE: Thu, 16 Sep 2010
SIZE: 9.84 MB
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Father Brown Mysteries - The Dagger With Wings (11-09-86)

The Dagger With Wings (Aired November 9, 1986) Father Brown's abilities are also considerably shaped by his experience as a priest and confessor. In "The Blue Cross", when asked by Flambeau, who has been masquerading as a priest, how he knew of all sorts of criminal "horrors," he responds: "Has it never struck you that a man who does next to nothing but hear men's real sins is not likely to be wholly unaware of human evil?" He also states a reason why he knew Flambeau was not a priest: "You attacked reason. It's bad theology." And indeed, the stories normally contain a rational explanation of who the murderer was and how Brown worked it out. Despite his devotion, or perhaps, because of it, Father Brown always emphasizes rationality: some stories, such as "The Miracle of Moon Crescent", "The Oracle of the Dog", "The Blast of the Book" and "The Dagger With Wings", poke fun at initially skeptical characters who become convinced of a supernatural explanation for some strange occurrence, while Father Brown easily sees the perfectly ordinary, natural explanation. In fact, he seems to represent an ideal of a devout, yet considerably educated and "civilised" clergyman. This can be traced to the influence of neo-scholastic thought on Chesterton. Father Brown is characteristically humble, and is usually rather quiet, but when he does talk, he almost always says something profound. Although he tends to handle crimes with a steady, realistic approach, he believes in the supernatural as the greatest reason of all. Father Brown was the perfect vehicle for conveying Chesterton's view of the world and, of all of his characters, is perhaps closest to Chesterton's own point of view, or at least the effect of his point of view. Father Brown solves his crimes through a strict reasoning process more concerned with spiritual and philosophic truths rather than scientific details, making him an almost equal counterbalance with Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, whose stories Chesterton read and admired. However, the Father Brown series commenced before Chesterton's own conversion to Catholicism.

DATE: Thu, 16 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.91 MB
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David Harding Counterspy - The Curious Conspiracy (10-20-50)

The Curious Conspiracy (Aired October 20, 1950) The show was at the top of the list among programs that had developed the technique of sound effects to a fine art. Each program was written with the sound in mind, not so much sound for sound's sake, but to advance the plot, add color or create atmosphere. Two sound effects men spent a reported ten hours in rehearsal for each broadcast, in addition to the time spent by the actors. East coast actors House Jameson, Don MacLaughlin, Phil Sterling and Lawson Zerbe [MBS] (Zerbe appeared as both David Harding and Harry Peters) were the only four actors to ever assume the role of David Harding--Jameson for the first two episodes only, replaced by Don MacLaughlin for the remainder of its twelve year run. Both Connecticut residents, House Jameson premiered in the role while Lord was still auditioning talent for the lead. By the third episode, Phillips H. Lord selected Don MacLaughlin for the role. MacLaughlin was by no means new to Radio, having already appeared in some 300 Radio productions since his debut over Radio in 1935. MacLaughlin's versatility, predominantly in action and straight dramatic roles, made him an ideal candidate among the twenty or so actors who auditioned for the part. The selection proved a prudent one for both Lord and MacLaughlin. MacLaughlin portrayed David Harding, the ostensible head of the 'United States Counterspies' unit of the federal government. As the Chief Counterspy for the imaginary agency, all reports of suspicious espionage activity were funneled to him, providing the wealth of plots and intrigues which kept the series fresh for some 500+ scripts throughout its run. David Harding's right hand in the series was Harry Peters, a special agent for the unit, portrayed by durable character actor, Mandel Kramer, later famous over Radio for his stint as Johnny Dollar of Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar. Notes From The Digital Deli. THIS EPISODE: October 20, 1950. NBC network. "The Case Of The Curious Conspiracy". Sustaining. The program is preceded by a news bulletin: Henry Stimson (former Secretary of State and former Secretary of War) has died. Don MacLaughlin, Phillips H. Lord (producer), Mandel Kramer, Marx B. Loeb (director), Edward Adamson (writer). 28:22.

DATE: Thu, 16 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.37 MB
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Nightbeat - The Man With The Red Hair (08-21-52)

The Man With The Red Hair (Aired August 21, 1952) Night Beat wasn't a juvenile crime adventure by any measure. Quite the contrary, most of the scripts from the series dealt with both contemporary and timeless themes revolving mostly around terms like isolation, despair, and the customary seven deadly sins, interspersed with occasional satires and humorous story arcs thrown in for variety. But irrespective of the plot, it was Frank Lovejoy's inherent basic humanity that shown through each episode. One would imagine that Night Beat's writing staff had to have been picking up on Lovejoy's interpretations of their scripts after a while. As much as we respect Lovejoy's talent, he clearly wasn't performing these characterizations in a vacuum. But it was that subtle sensitivity underscoring each of his performances that captured the interest of most of the series' enduring fans. Sadly, Night Beat was produced by NBC, who, much as they had with several other of their highly promising--and successful--crime and detective dramas of the era, seemed hellbent on sabotaging their most promising productions through a bewildering series of rescheduling fiascos, total absence of promotion of any kind, and just plain abandonment. Indeed, though NBC produced many highly popular crime, mystery and detective dramas during the late 1940s and early 1950s, their individual successes were in spite of NBC, rather than due to NBC. One can only surmise that NBC was so consumed with looking over its shoulder throughout this period--or so smitten with their new child, Television--that they were simply asleep at the Radio switch for as much as eight years after the Justice Department-mandated break-up of their numerous, parallel networks. Either that, or some middle manager was embezzling the corporate promotion and P.R. budget. Whatever the convoluted rationale behind their 'strategy' truly was, Night Beat and other fine NBC vehicles of that era soldiered on, simply on the strength of their grassroots demand, appeal, and basic underlying quality, but certainly not for any concerted promotional or even basic coordination efforts from the network. The upshot of NBC's apparent planned obsolescence, from an historical standpoint in any case, is that sixty years later it's become virtually impossible to log and document this fine series no matter how extensive is one's access to newspaper morgues and trade magazines. THIS EPISODE: August 21, 1952. "The Man With The Red Hair" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Pabst Beer. Randy Stone meets a beautiful woman in a bar and goes pub crawling with her in the Chicago night. Beware the man with the red hair! The opening is slightly upcut. Frank Lovejoy, Betty Moran, Warren Lewis (producer, director), John Bagni (writer), Gwen Bagni (writer), Frank Worth (music), Peter Leeds, Jan Arvan, Tudor Owen. 29:10.

DATE: Wed, 15 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.45 MB
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Dragnet - The Big TV (02-05-57)

The Big TV (Aired March 2, 1954) The ominous four note introduction to the brass and tympani theme music, titled Danger Ahead, is instantly recognizable as well as the shows opening narration: "Ladies and gentlemen, the story you are about to hear is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent." The original Dragnet starring Jack Webb as Sergeant Joe Friday ran on radio from June 3rd, 1949 to February 26th, 1957; and on television from December 16th, 1951 to August 23rd, 1959, and from January 12th, 1967 to April 16th, 1970. All of these versions ran on NBC. There were two Dragnet feature films, a straight adaptation starring Jack Webb in 1954, and a comedy spoof in 1987. There were also television revivals, without Webb, in 1989 and 2003. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters. Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor. Gradually, Friday's deadpanned, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop: tough, but not hard; conservative, but caring". Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a long time radio actor. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated, and sparse -- influenced by the hard-boiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving, but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step-by-step. From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. Webb was a stickler for accurate details, and Dragnet used many authentic touches, such as LAPD's actual radio call sign, KMA-367, and the names of many real department officials, such as Ray Pinker and Lee Jones of the Crime Lab, or Chief of Detectives, Thad Brown. Two announcers were used. Episodes began with announcer George Fennemen intoning the series opening: "The story you are about to hear is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent." Hal Gibney described the basic premise of the episode. THIS EPISODE: March 2, 1954. Program #237. NBC network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. "The Big TV". Harriet Shipley has disappeared with her baby, after threats had been made against her life. Jack Webb, Ben Alexander, George Fenneman (announcer), Marty Winn (technical advisor), Vance Frazer (technical advisor). 25:52.

DATE: Wed, 15 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.81 MB
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The Adventures Of Frank Merriwell - Mystery Of Green Hill (02-12-49)

Mystery Of Green Hill (Aired February 12, 1949) Frank Merriwell is a fictional character appearing in a series of novels and short stories by Gilbert Patten, who wrote under the pseudonym Burt L. Standish. The character also appears in numerous radio serials and comic books based on the stories. The model for all later American juvenile sports fiction, Merriwell excelled at football, baseball, basketball, crew and track at Yale while solving mysteries and righting wrongs. He played with great strength and received traumatic blows without injury. A biographical entry on Patten noted dryly that Frank Merriwell "had little in common with his creator or his readers." Patten offered some background on his character: "The name was symbolic of the chief characteristics I desired my hero to have. Frank for frankness, merry for a happy disposition, well for health and abounding vitality." Merriwell's classmates observed, "He never drinks. That's how he keeps himself in such fine condition all the time. He will not smoke, either, and he takes his exercise regularly. He is really a remarkable freshie." Merriwell originally appeared in a series of magazine stories starting April 18, 1896 ("Frank Merriwell: or, First Days at Fardale") in Tip Top Weekly, continuing through 1912, and later in dime novels and comic books. Patten would confine himself to a hotel room for a week to write an entire story. The Frank Merriwell comic strip began in 1928, continuing until 1936. Daily strips from 1934 provided illustrations for the 1937 Big Little Book. The Adventures of Frank Merriwell first ran on NBC radio from March 26 to June 22, 1934 as a 15-minute serial airing three times a week at 5:30pm. Sponsored by Dr. West's Toothpaste, this program starred Donald Briggs in the title role. Harlow Wilcox was the announcer. After a 12-year gap, the series returned October 5, 1946 as a 30-minute Saturday morning show on NBC, continuing until June 4, 1949. Lawson Zerbe starred as Merriwell, Jean Gillespie and Elaine Rostas as Inza Burrage, Harold Studer as Bart Hodge and Patricia Hosley as Elsie Belwood. Announcers were Mel Brandt and Harlow Wilcox, and the Paul Taubman Orchestra supplied the background music. A film serial entitled The Adventures of Frank Merriwell was created by Universal Studios in 1936. THIS EPISODE: February 12, 1949. NBC network. "The Mystery Of Green Hill". Sustaining. Inza and her Aunt Belle discover a haunted house and a pile of bones, but Frank suspects things aren't quite all they seem. Lawson Zerbe, Hal Studer, Elaine Rost, Harlow Wilcox (announcer), Burt L. Standish (creator). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Tue, 14 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.28 MB
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The Damon Runyon Theater - Broadway Complex (06-12-49)

Broadway Complex (Aired June 12, 1949) The Damon Runyon Theater was a 52 show series that was syndicated across the USA beginning in early 1949. Damon Runyon was a gifted sports writer in New York City as well as being a great journalist and great short story writer. His stories were humorous ones, written in the "dem" and "dose" vernacular of the city's loveable and not so loveable characters of Broadway, the prize ring and the underworld. His most famous collection of short stories, Guys and Dolls, was on Broadway and later made into a movie. Many of his stories were filmed including Sorrowful Jones, A Pocketful of Miracles, Lady for a Day, Blue Plate Special, The Lemon Drop Kid (twice) and Little Miss Marker (four times). In addition to this The Damon Runyon Theater was syndicated for television in the mid 1950s. THIS EPISODE: June 12, 1949 - Program #24. Mayfair syndication. "Broadway Complex". Commercials added locally. A simple soul turns out to be an avid reader, and an attentive one. Damon Runyon (author), John Brown, Richard Sanville (director), Russell Hughes (writer), Vern Carstensen (production supervisor). 26:56.

DATE: Tue, 14 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.99 MB
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The Man Called X - The Silver Scarab (06-19-47)

The Silver Scarab (Aired June 19, 1947) The Man Called X started over Radio with the 1944 CBS Summer replacement run for Lux Radio Theatre, comprising a total of eight episodes. The only circulating exemplar from the first run is contained within the AFRS Globe Theatre canon of transcriptions. So, yet again, we are indebted to the incredible output of AFRS and AFRTS transcriptions over the years in preserving some of Radio's rarest exemplars from The Golden Age of Radio. But if one compares that circulating episode to the spot ad for the summer run in the sidebar, one sees the program promoted as a comedy-mystery. The 1944 CBS Summer season finale, Murder, Music and A Blonde Madonna, gives some credence to the way CBS promoted this first run. Starring Herbert Marshall as Ken Thurston, a private operative, with Han Conried as Egon Zellschmidt in this first incarnation of Ken Thurston's nemesis, and Mary Jane Croft appearing in the role of Ken's love interest, Nancy Bessington, a reporter and Thurston's erstwhile fiance. We can only interpolate from what we've already turned up for this shortest run of The Man Called X, but it would appear that Hans Conried and Mary Jane Croft may have been regulars co-stars throughout that first season. One of Radio's most successful directors, William N. Robson, directed the first season of The Man Called X and though Gordon Jenkins appears to be credited with the music for the first season, Felix Mills is also personally cited by Herbert Marshall with at least one Music Direction credit--the season finale. Shows Notes From The Digital Deli THIS EPISODE: June 19, 1947. CBS network. "The Silver Scarab". Sponsored by: Frigidaire. While in Cairo on the trail of pirate on the Red Sea, Ken Thurston is killed by three silver bullets. Herbert Marshall, Leon Belasco, J. Richard Kennedy (originator), Wendell Niles (announcer), Jack Johnstone (director), Sidney Marshall (writer), Johnny Green (composer, conductor). 29:33.

DATE: Tue, 14 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.82 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone" - Drive To Fort Huachuca (05-18-58)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone" - Drive To Fort Huachuca (Aired May 18, 1958) CBS started the year 1958 off with the introduction on January 1, 1958 of Frontier Gentleman. That series lasted 41 broadcasts. Near the end of the year, the network launched Have Gun, Will Travel on November 11, 1958, which continued for 106 programs. In between, a very short series was offered and discontinued after only 16 broadcasts, Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone. Sam Buffington starred as Luke Slaughter, a Civil War cavalryman who turned to cattle ranching in post war Arizona territory near Fort Huachuca. William N. Robson, known from his work with such series as Escape, Suspense and The CBS Radio Workshop, directed. Sam Buffington enacted the title role on Luke Slaughter of Tombstone, another of CBS's prestigious adult Westerns. The series was produced and directed by William N. Robson, one of radio's greatest dramatic directors and Robert Stanley producer was aired from February 23 through June 15, 1958. Buffington portrayed the hard-boiled cattleman with scripts overseen by Gunsmoke sound effects artist (and sometimes scriptwriter) Tom Hanley. Each program had an authoritative opening statement: "Slaughter's my name, Luke Slaughter. Cattle's my business. It's a tough business, it's a big business. I got a big stake in it. And there's no man west of the Rio Grande big enough to take it away from me." Junius Matthews was heard as Slaughter's sidekick, Wichita. In his first adventure, tough-as-nails westerner Luke Slaughter guarantees he will bring a cattle herd to Tombstone despite the threats of rustlers and a spy among the ranks of his cowboys. Like the other CBS radio westerns, Have Gun, Will Travel or Frontier Gentleman, this one had plenty of action, the productions were well done and well acted. Luke Slaugher was cut short, like a lot of other radio shows, by the steady pressure from TV. THIS EPISODE: May 18, 1958. "Drive To Fort Huachuca" - CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. Watson and his baddies from the Triple X are determined to keep Luke's herd from reaching the army post at Fort Huachucha. Sam Buffington, William N. Robson (director), Wilbur Hatch (music). 25 minutes.

DATE: Tue, 14 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.80 MB
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Crime & Peter Chambers - Irene Wilson's Dead Uncle Stanley (09-07-54)

Irene Wilson's Dead Uncle Stanley (Aired September 7, 1954) Crime and Peter Chambers, stared Dane Clark as a hard-hitting private eye that worked well the with police department. His counter part at the NYPD was Lt Parker played by Bill Zuckert. The series was based on the character created by Henry Kane who wrote eight Peter Chambers novels before the series came to radio. Henry Kane wrote the scripts for the radio show adaptation which aired from 6 Apr – 7 Sep 1954 on NBC. The show was directed by Fred Weihe. There are a total of 21 episodes available from the series. THIS EPISODE: September 7, 1954. "Irene Wilson's Dead Uncle Stanley" - NBC network. Sustaining. Fred Weihe (director), William Zuckert, Patricia Weil, William Griffis, Fred Weihe (director), Roger Tuttle (promotional announcement), Dane Clark, Henry Kane (creater, writer). 23:51.

DATE: Tue, 14 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.82 MB
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The Adventures Of The Falcon - The Case Of The Carved Ham (04-08-51)

The Case Of The Carved Ham (Aired April 8, 1951) The success of the Falcon films led to a radio series that premiered on the American Blue Network in April 1943, and aired for the next ten years on various networks. It was here that his transition into a private eye was finalized, with The Falcon, now called MICHAEL WARING working as a hardboiled insurance investigator, with an office and a secretary, Nancy. Barry Kroeger was the first radio voice of the Falcon, followed by James Meighan, Les Tremayne, George Petrie, and Les Damon. Nearly all the shows were broadcast from New York. Each show usually started out with a telephone call to The Falcon from a beautiful woman. Answering in his slightly British accent, he would reply to her and another adventure would follow. Waring was snappy and sarcastic with the incompetent police who were inevitably unable to solve the mysteries without his help. Like the films, the radio plots mixed danger, romance and comedy in equal parts. A total of about 70 shows, representing the length of the run, are available today. It was this version of the Falcon that was made into another short series of films, three in all, with John Calvert as Waring, produced by Film Classics. And it was this film version of the Falcon that in turn was adapted, in the mid-fifties, for a brief syndicated television series, starring Charles McGraw now as a slightly more hardboiled, and less dashing Falcon. but again, his occupation had changed. He was now a "famous undercover agent" who operated "around the world on his hazardous missions," as the promos put it. As Richard Meyers points out, in TV Detectives, "the character had come full circle. The Mike Waring the gravel-voiced McGraw played was basically the same rough-hewn adventurer Arlen had presented to his readers in 1940." THIS EPISODE: April 8, 1951. NBC network. "The Case Of The Carved Hand". Sponsored by: Kraft Velveeta, Kraft Caramels. The Falcon suspects that Joe Santos is behind the killing of Brian King and the mutilation of Stuart Van Dyke. Les Damon, Ed Herlihy (announcer), Jackson Beck, Mason Adams, Eugene Wang (writer), Ken Lynch, Glenda Isby (Vassar dramatic student), Bernard L. Schubert (producer), Drexel Drake (creator), Arlo (music), Richard Lewis (director). 29:32.

DATE: Mon, 13 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.95 MB
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Bulldog Drummond - Claim Check Murders (01-17-47)

Claim Check Murders (Aired January 17, 1947) The Bulldog Drummond stories followed Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond, D.S.O., M.C., a wealthy former WWI officer of the fictional Loamshire Regiment, who, after the war, spends his new-found leisure time as a private detective. Drummond is a proto-James Bond figure and a version of the imperial adventurers depicted by the likes of John Buchan. In terms of the detective genre, the first Bulldog Drummond novel was published after the Sherlock Holmes stories, the Nayland Smith/Fu Manchu novels and Richard Hannay's first three adventures including The Thirty-Nine Steps. The character first appeared in the novel Bulldog Drummond (1920), and this was followed by a lengthy series of books and adaptations for films, radio and television. "Drummond... has the appearance of an English gentleman: a man who fights hard, plays hard and lives clean... His best friend would not call him good-looking but he possess that cheerful type of ugliness which inspires immediate confidence ... Only his eyes redeem his face. Deep-set and steady, with eyelashes that many women envy, they show him to be a sportsman and an adventurer. Drummond goes outside the law when he feels the ends justify the means." The opening of the radio show starts with a the sounds of footsteps, foghorn, then two shots ring out, followed by three blows of a police officer's whistle. Bulldog was a methodical crime-solving sleuth who let nothing get in his way of his goal, which was to put a stop to crime! Bulldog believed in uncomplicated and decisive means of getting his way with the lords of the underworld. This usually led to their swift capture, and the easing of the city's burden brought about by these ruthless thugs. THIS EPISODE: January 17, 1947. "Claim Check Murders" - Mutual network. Sustaining. A $1000 bill and a parcel claim ticket lead Captain Drummond and Denny to the trail of a fortune in stolen radium. Art Van Horn (announcer), Edward Adamson (writer), Mercedes McCambridge, Ned Wever. 29:26.

DATE: Mon, 13 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.47 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Frontier Gentleman" - The Shelton Brothers (02-02-58)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Frontier Gentleman" - The Shelton Brothers (Aired February 2, 1958) 1958's Frontier Gentleman wasn't a ground-breaking adult western. That ground had been pulverized both in Radio and Television six years earlier. But Frontier Gentleman's perspective on the rough and tumble Montana and Wyoming Territories of the 1870s was a fascinating twist on the--by then--formulaic adult western. The premise has J.B. Kendall, a cashiered British Cavalry officer who spent most of his military career in the Punjab area of India. He takes a position with the London Times, on assignment to cover the developing frontier of the Montana and Wyoming Territories of America during the 1870s. His portfolio is to transmit first-person accounts of the roaring American frontier, offering insights into that tumultous time of exploration, colonization, warring Indian tribes, and the rampant anarchy still prevalent in most of the frontier towns of the era. The premise would normally sell itself, but may have been too little, too late for its time. Any new Radio western--no matter how novel--was pretty much doomed at the outset during the late 1950s. Television was already in reruns of the twenty to thirty western adventures that proliferated on TV during the 1950s. And it was stiff competition, to be sure. Gunsmoke had achieved off the chart ratings for years, and Have Gun, Will Travel was very much a thinking person's western. This takes nothing away from either John Dehner or Ben Wright's performances in the least. They were consistently top notch. But we'd venture to say that Frontier Gentleman is heard today by far more listeners than ever heard it when it was first broadcast. Be that as it may, it's the listeners of today that matter now. Frontier Gentleman consistently offers a wonderful variation on the western theme. Antony Ellis' scripts are well devised, historically accurate, and fully developed, given the imposed 30-minute formula. The atmosphere provided by both sound engineering and a young Jerry Goldsmith's magnificent musical background also places this program a notch or two above its peers. THIS EPISODE: February 2, 1958. CBS network. "The Shelton Brothers". Sustaining. The first show of the series. Kendall takes on the entire Shelton gang in a small town in the Montana Territory. This episode is also known as "The Shelton Brothers." Parts of the public service announcements have been deleted. John Dehner, Jack Kruschen, Harry Bartell, Barney Phillips, Virginia Gregg, Stacy Harris, Johnny Jacobs (announcer), Antony Ellis (writer, producer, director), Jerry Goldsmith (composer, conductor). 24:14.

DATE: Mon, 13 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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First Nighter Program - Help Wanted Female (01-08-48)

Help Wanted Female (Aired January 8, 1948) The First Nighter Program was a long-running radio anthology comedy-drama series broadcast from 1930 to 1953. The host was Mr. First Nighter (Charles P. Hughes, Macdonald Carey, Bret Morrison, Marvin Miller, Don Briggs and Rye Billsbury [later known as Michael Rye). The show's opening recreated the aural atmosphere of a Broadway opening. Before each week's drama began, Mr. First Nighter was first heard walking on Broadway, emerging from the noise of people and street traffic into the crowded lobby of "the Little Theater Off Times Square" and then taking his seat in the third row center, where he gave the whispered introduction: The house lights have dimmed, and the curtain is about to go up on tonight's production. Romantic comedies were the specialty of the series, and the principal roles were played by the teams of Don Ameche and June Meredith (1930-36), Ameche and Betty Lou Gerson (1935-36), Les Tremayne and Barbara Luddy (1936-43) and Olan Soule and Luddy (1943 and after). Joseph T. Ainley produced and directed the series. The announcers were Larry Keating and Vincent Pelletier. Music was provided by Eric Sagerquist (1930-44), Caesar Petrillo (1945-46) and Frank Worth (1947-53). Performing before a studio audience, the actors wore formal attire, with Luddy in a gown and Tremayne clad in evening clothes and top hat. The series ran on three radio networks in the following timeline: 11/27/30 to 09/29/33 NBC-Blue, 10/06/33 to 02/12/37 NBC, 02/19/37 to 12/21/37 CBS, 01/07/38 to 08/26/38 NBC, 09/02/38 to 05/29/42 CBS, 10/04/42 to 10/25/44 Mutual, 10/20/45 to 04/13/46 CBS, 10/04/47 to 10/20/49 CBS, 04/27/52 to 09/27/53 NBC (repeats). The show was hosted by The Campana Company and solely featured commercials for their product. Due largely in part to this exposure, their Italian Balm became the best-selling hand lotion in the United States in the 1930s. THIS EPISODE: January 8, 1948. CBS network. "Help Wanted, Female". Sponsored by: Campana cosmetics. Fraud for the starving children of Europe. Barbara Luddy, Olan Soule, William Conrad, Parley Baer, Floyd Miller (writer). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Mon, 13 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.14 MB
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The Red Skelton Raleigh Cigarette Program - Deadeye Trades In His Horse (09-17-48)

Deadeye Trades In His Horse (Aired September 17, 1948) After appearances on The Rudy Vallee Show in 1937, Skelton became a regular in 1939's Avalon Time on NBC, sponsored by Avalon Cigarettes. On October 7, 1941, Skelton premiered his own radio show, The Raleigh Cigarette Program, developing a number of recurring characters including punch-drunk boxer "Cauliflower McPugg," inebriated "Willy Lump-Lump" and "'Mean Widdle Kid' Junior," whose favorite phrase ("I dood it!") soon became part of the American lexicon. That, along with "He bwoke my widdle arm!" (or other body part) and "He don't know me vewy well, do he?" all found their way into various Warner Bros. cartoons. Skelton himself was referenced in a Popeye cartoon in which the title character enters a haunted house and encounters a "red skeleton." The Three Stooges also referenced Skelton in Creeps (1956): Shemp: "Who are you?" Talking Skeleton: "Me? I’m Red." Shemp: "Oh, Red Skeleton." Other characters included "Con Man San Fernando Red," cross-eyed seagulls "Gertrude and Heathcliffe" and the singing cabdriver "Clem Kadiddlehopper," who was a country bumpkin with a big heart. Clem had a knack for upstaging city slickers, even if he couldn't manipulate his cynical father: "When the stork brought you, Clem, I shoulda shot him on sight!" Skelton would later consider court action against the apparent usurpation of this character by Bill Scott for the voice of Bullwinkle.[citation needed] The comedian helped sell World War II war bonds on the top-rated show, which featured Ozzie and Harriet Nelson in the supporting cast, plus the Ozzie Nelson Orchestra and announcer Truman Bradley. Harriet Nelson was the show's vocalist. It was during this period that Red divorced his first wife, Edna, and married his second wife Georgia. According to the director George Sydney, he met Georgia while visiting the set of The Harvey Girls (1945) where Georgia, also nicknamed Red, played one of the "bad" girls working at the Alhambra bar. Red and Georgia's only son, Richard, was born in 1945. Georgia continued in her role as Red's manager until the 1960s. Skelton was drafted in March 1944, so his popular series was discontinued on June 6. Shipped overseas to serve with an Army entertainment unit as a private, Skelton led an exceptionally hectic military life. In addition to his own duties and responsibilities, he was often summoned to entertain officers late at night. The perpetual motion and lack of rest resulted in a nervous breakdown in Italy. He spent three months in a hospital and was discharged in September 1945. He once joked about his military career, "I was the only celebrity who went in and came out a private." On December 4, 1945, The Raleigh Cigarette Program resumed with Skelton introducing some new characters, including, "Bolivar Shagnasty" and "J. Newton Numbskull." Lurene Tuttle and Verna Felton appeared as Junior's mother and grandmother. David Forrester and David Rose led the orchestra, featuring vocalist Anita Ellis. The announcers were Pat McGeehan and Rod O'Connor. The series ended May 20, 1949. That fall, he moved to CBS, where the show ran until May 1953.

DATE: Sun, 12 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.60 MB
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It Pays To Be Ignorant - Person Lives The Longest (12-08-44)

Person Lives The Longest (Aired December 8, 1944) It Pays to Be Ignorant was a radio comedy show which maintained its popularity during a nine-year run on three networks for such sponsors as Philip Morris, Chrysler, and DeSoto. The series was a spoof on the authoritative, academic discourse evident on such authoritative panel series as Quiz Kids and Information Please, while the beginning of the program parodied the popular quiz show, Doctor I.Q. With announcers Ken Roberts and Dick Stark, the program was broadcast on Mutual from June 25, 1942 to February 28, 1944, on CBS from February 25, 1944 to September 27, 1950 and finally on NBC from July 4, 1951 to September 26, 1951. The satirical series featured "a board of experts who are dumber than you are and can prove it." Tom Howard was the quizmaster who asked questions of dim-bulb panelists Harry McNaughton, Lulu McConnell and George Shelton. The Irish-born Howard (1885-1955) and Shelton (1885-1972) had previously worked together as a team in vaudeville and comedy film shorts, while McConnell (1882-1962) and British comic McNaughton (1896-1967) had both appeared in many Broadway musical comedies and revues between 1920 and the late 1930s. Howard's questions often had the answer obvious in the query ("What town in Massachusetts had the Boston Tea Party?") . Even so, the panelists would inevitably get the answer wrong, providing outrageously funny answers instead, followed by an even more uproarious rationale for their answer. The show had a number of running gags which became catch phrases with listeners such as McNaughton's "Now we're back to Miss McConnell again" and Shelton's "I used to woik in that town." The original radio cast brought the show to television. It was first seen on CBS from June 6 to September 19, 1949. After two years, the series returned on NBC from July 5 to September 27, 1951. The series was revived by Stefan Hatos-Monty Hall Productions as a weekly syndicated series from September 10, 1973 to September, 1974. In this version, host Joe Flynn queried panelists Jo Anne Worley, Billy Baxter and Match Game regular Charles Nelson Reilly. A spoof was done in the mid-1950s by Jackie Gleason. THIS EPISODE: December 8, 1944. Program #28. CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. The first question (at the opening): "What Kind Of A Person Lives The Longest?" The first question (during the program): "In the song, 'I'm Dreaming Of A White Christmas,' (what is) the color of the Christmas the singer is dreaming about?" Tom Howard (m. c.), George Shelton, Lulu McConnell, Harry McNaughton, Ken Roberts (announcer), Ted Collins (guest), Kate Smith (guest), Nat Novick and His Orchestra. 28:23.

DATE: Sun, 12 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.08 MB
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The Burns & Allen Show - A Party For The Neighbors (12-08-42)

A Party For The Neighbors (Aired December 8, 1942) Burns and Allen were an American comedy duo consisting of George Burns and his wife, Gracie Allen.Burns wrote most of the material, and played the straight man. Allen played a silly, addleheaded woman. Both attributed their success to the other, to the ends of their lives. Early on, the team had played the opposite roles until they noticed that the audience was laughing at Gracie's straight lines, so they made the change. Burns and Allen developed their popular routine over more than three decades of stage, radio, film, and television. Historians of popular culture have often stated that Allen was a brilliant comedian, whose entire career consisted of engaging in dialogues of "illogical logic" that left her verbal opponents dazed and confused, and her audiences in stitches. During a typical 23-minute episode of the Burns and Allen show, the vast majority of the dialogue and speaking parts were written for Allen, who was credited with having the genius to deliver her lengthy diatribes in a fashion that made it look as though she was making her arguments up on the spot. (One running gag on the TV show was the existence of a closet full of hats belonging to various visitors to the Burns household, where the guests would slip out the door unnoticed, leaving their hats behind, rather than face another round with Gracie.) A continuing joke on the show was that George would say, "Say good night, Gracie," and Gracie would say, "Good night Gracie!" Ralph Pape used the catchphrase for the title of his play, Say Goodnight, Gracie, produced by Steppenwolf in 1983, and the phrase lives on as a title of other books and stage productions.

DATE: Sun, 12 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.58 MB
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Suspense - The Customers Like Murder (03-23-43)

The Customers Like Murder (Aired March 23, 1943) Suspense was actually spawned from another series called Forecast. The 1940 horror show was entitled Suspense and it was based on the Marie Belloc Lowndes' short Jack-the-Ripper novella, The Lodger. It was directed by Alfred Hitchcock, who had made a 1926 silent film based on the same story (Grams, 1997, 3). Its subtle ending generated a large volume of mail which convinced CBS executives that they had a strong market. Two years later, Suspense was aired. It became one of radio's longest lasting shows, surviving twenty years of consistent success. It had numerous announcers during those two decades, ranging from the early Berry Kroeger to the veteran announcers, Paul Frees and George Walsh. But it was Joseph Kearns who evolved into "The Man in Black" host in 1943. This mysterious all-knowing narrator was similar to The Whistler.. The character lasted for over 100 episodes until March of 1945. Kerns continued as host through 1947, and returned again in 1950, but "The Man in Black" role devolved back into a nameless announcer (Grams, 1997, 17). Yet the series itself continued on as strong as ever. It attracted Hollywood's best actors because they were allowed to play roles different from their usual stereotypes. Comedians could play killers, or heroes could play victims. Jack Benny played a Martian. Ronald Reagan played a man on the run framed for a crime he didn't commit. Lucille Ball played a cold-blooded murderer. Frank Sinatra played a psychopath. All the while, audiences were kept wondering and waiting to see what the surprise ending would be. They expected the unexpected, and they usually got it. Some of the same stories would later be adapted to TV and performed on Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Hitchcock was, after all, billed as "the Master of Suspense." And there was a certain amount of poetic justice in him borrowing from the radio series, since he was so instrumental in creating it. Examples of stories he recycled include "Banquo's Chair" and "Dead Ernest". The later story involved a man who is hit by a car and mistaken for dead. But he's actually quite alive, just catatonic. He can hear everything as the morgue man prepares to suck the blood from his body and perform an autopsy. The listener sits on needles waiting to hear if they'll discover their mistake in time, as the victim is unable to move a muscle in his defense. Its stories like these that made Suspense so, well-- suspenseful. But Hitchcock wasn't the only one taking stories from radio. Everyone in TV was, and they were also borrowing writers, actors, musicians, and anyone else with talent who wanted greater pay and exposure. The drain on resources eventually sucked radio dry. The final blow was when the audience itself was borrowed and not returned. Suspense broadcast its last episode (#945) on September 30th, 1962 (the last day for new network radio drama in general). It was the end of a great series, and an even greater era. THIS EPISODE: March 23, 1943. CBS network. "The Customers Like Murder". Sustaining. An English mystery writer and his secretary are kidnapped. They use their professional talents against the real killers. The system cue has been deleted. Bernard Herrmann (composer, conductor), John Dickson Carr (writer), John Dietz (director), Peggy Conklin, Roland Young, William Spier (producer, director, editor), Joseph Kearns ("The Man In Black"). 29:39.

DATE: Sat, 11 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.07 MB
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The Hall of Fantasy - The Perfect Script (02-13-47)

The Perfect Script (Aired February 13, 1947) When it comes to The Hall of Fantasy, there are some mysteries that persist to this day. Maybe that's appropriate, because it claimed to be "the series of radio dramas dedicated to the supernatural, the unusual, and the unknown." One mystery that remains unknown is who the announcer actually was. His lines were so over-the-top, maybe he wished to remain anonymous. But it's this same dead serious approach to monsters, horror, and the supernatural that makes this series so much fun to listen to in a modern context. Despite this campy dimension to the program, do not assume that the series wasn't scary. Many episodes were rather frightening. If the dark, desolate atmospheres didn't get at your nerves, the down-beat endings usually did. A common scene occurred at night, with the crickets chirping in the background. The two protagonists would be lost or running for their lives (or both!). They would hear a far off scream, and they would realize-- along with the audience-- that the friend was a goner. One episode, 'Hang Man's Rope,' never revealed exactly how the killer managed to catch and hang his victims, or why. The only thing we knew for sure was when the crickets stopped chirping and the dog started howling, someone would wind up hanging from the nearest tree. The protagonists spent most the show trying to solve the mystery. They failed. But at least one of them saw how the killer accomplished his dark deed. Unfortunately, he didn't live long enough to explain it. All we heard was a sudden scream, the snap of his neck, and the stretching of the rope as his body swayed. Talk about dark, the lights in The Hall of Fantasy always seemed to be shot out But not everything about the show is shrouded in mystery. We know that the series started as a different program altogether. It began at KALL in Salt Lake City in 1946 and lasted a year. Richard Thorne and Carl Greyson were announcers who created a bare bones murder mystery drama with stories written or adapted by Robert Olson. But when Thorne and Greyson went separate ways, the series discontinued. Then in 1949, Thorne and Greyson happened to work at the same station again (WGN in Chicago) and the series resumed. This time, the focus was on supernatural horror with Richard Thorne writing or adapting the stories. The three dozen or so shows that survived appear to have been recorded for broadcast transcriptions. (A recorded scene from the climax is played at the beginning of the program as a teaser.) Richard Thorne is one of the main recurring actors. Hall of Fantasy didn't seem to have much of a budget. The actors weren't big names and the music and sound effects were sometimes lackluster. But the situations and original writing often made up for these shortcomings. It was similar in that way to another low budget but even more imaginative series, Quiet Please. THIS EPISODE: February 13, 1947. Mutual network. "The Perfect Script". Commercials deleted. An insane radio producer entices a script writer to his isolated beach house to write "the perfect script." Drugs and insanity await him. Robert Olsen (writer), Richard Thorne (performer, producer, director), Carl Grayson, Beth Colter, Nelson Hall, Earl Donaldson (music). 27:20.

DATE: Sat, 11 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.92 MB
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The New Adventures Of Nero Wolf - The Hasty Will (03-02-51)

The Hasty Will (Aired March 2, 1951) Rex Stout's extraordinary, rotund, beer-swilling, agoraphobic character, Nero Wolfe, remains one of Detective genre's most fascinating, fully formed characterizations in American Detective Fiction History. The first of Stout's Nero Wolfe novels to escape the written page was Fer de Lance, as first interpreted for the big screen by Edward Arnold in 1936's Meet Nero Wolfe for Columbia. The Adventures of Nero Wolfe were first heard over the New England Network of Westinghouse Radio stations throughout Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Rhode Island Nero Wolfe languished in popular media for another seven years, until he was reprised over Radio by the old New England Network as The Adventures of Nero Wolfe. Sadly, precious little is known about this first series, other than the dates of its run and its principal actor, J.B. Williams in the role of Nero Wolfe. It was with the series' transition to its first national network that The Adventures of Nero Wolfe was first heard by a national audience. But again, many of the details of this second, Summer 1943 run of 13 episodes--other than its episode titles and its star, famous character actor Santos Ortega in the role of Nero Wolfe--remain a mystery to this day. Indeed, we have only one representative episode of the 1944 run of The Adventures of Nero Wolfe in circulation to date--and that lone episode is preserved only by its inclusion as a selection for the Armed Forces Radio Service's Mystery Playhouse series. The production run starred Santos Ortega in the role of Nero Wolfe and Joseph Julian as Archie Goodwin. The next run of Nero Wolfe appears as The Amazing Nero Wolfe, starring Francis X. Bushman as Nero Wolfe, with Elliott Lewis as Archie Goodwin. As best as we can determine, this was a Don Lee-Mutual Network production from the West Coast. Indeed it may possibly have been broadcast only in The West. But again, we have one--and only one--circulating example episode from that series--the last episode of its run. THIS EPISODE: March 2, 1951. NBC network. "The Case Of The Hasty Will". Sustaining. Nero Wolfe and Archie are paid $1000 to witness the execution of a will. A simple case soon involves a corpse and twin brothers. The story title is tentative. The final promotional announcement and system cue have been deleted. Sydney Greenstreet, John Edison (writer), J. Donald Wilson (producer, director), Harry Bartell, William Johnstone, Don Stanley (announcer), Victor Rodman, Louise Arthur, Hal Gerard, Rex Stout (creator). 29:10.

DATE: Sat, 11 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.98 MB
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Mysterious Traveler - Vacation From Life (09-07-47)

Vacation From Life (Aired September 7, 1947) Mysterious Traveler was the second outing for the prolific writing team of Robert Arthur, Jr. and David P. Kogan, two successful pulp fiction writers and publishers. Their first effort was a 27-program run of Dark Destiny (1942-43). Most of the Dark Destiny scripts are heard again in The Mysterious Traveler (1943), The Sealed Book (1945) and The Teller of Tales (1950). The team of Robert Arthur, Jr., David Kogan, producer/director Sherman 'Jock' MacGregor, and actor Maurice Tarplin was a very successful one for both The Mutual Broadcasting System and Radio station WOR. Between 1944 and 1952, The Mysterious Traveler eventually became one of the sixteen highest rated Radio programs of their era. WOR and MBS took great pride in putting together a program that could rival Radio giants CBS, ABC, and NBC throughout the era. During its heyday The Mysterious Traveler spawned several similar thriller genre programs such as The Strange Dr. Wierd (1945), The Sealed Book (1945), Dark Venture (1946), Murder By Experts (1949), and The Teller of Tales (1950). The thriller genre was not new to Radio in the 1940s. The Witch's Tale had aired from 1931 to 1938 over The Mutual Broadcasting System and WOR. CBS had tried--and failed at--their own The Witching Hour for three months in 1932. Oklahoma Radio station WKY had successfully aired their own Dark Fantasy (1941) anthology of thrillers, which was immediately picked up by NBC for a national run. But clearly, The Mutual system and WOR appear to have acquired the inside track for the thriller genre for almost two decades during The Golden Age of Radio. This is not to discount in any way the suspense thrillers from CBS and NBC during the same period. Inner Sanctum (1941-1952) aired very successfully over NBC Blue, ABC, and CBS during much the same period as The Mysterious Traveler. THIS EPISODE: September 7, 1947. Mutual network. "Vacation From Life". Sustaining. A meek college professor finds an explosive mine on a beach and decides to put it to use. David Kogan (writer, producer, director), Maurice Tarplin, Robert A. Arthur (writer). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Fri, 10 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.62 MB
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The Great Gildersleeve - Investigating The City Jail (10-05-41)

Investigating The City Jail (Airing October 5, 1941) Aiding and abetting the periodically frantic life in the Gildersleeve home was family cook and housekeeper Birdie Lee Coggins (Lillian Randolph). Although in the first season, under writer Levinson, Birdie was often portrayed as saliently less than bright, she slowly developed as the real brains and caretaker of the household under writers John Whedon, Sam Moore and Andy White. In many of the later episodes Gildersleeve has to acknowledge Birdie's commonsense approach to some of his predicaments. By the early 1950s, Birdie was heavily depended on by the rest of the family in fulfilling many of the functions of the household matriarch, whether it be giving sound advice to an adolescent Leroy or tending Marjorie's children. By the late 1940s, Marjorie slowly matures to a young woman of marrying age. During the 9th season (September 1949-June 1950) Marjorie meets and marries (May 10) Walter "Bronco" Thompson (Richard Crenna), star football player at the local college. The event was popular enough that Look devoted five pages in its May 23, 1950 issue to the wedding. After living in the same household for a few years with their twin babies Ronnie and Linda, the newlyweds move next door to keep the expanding Gildersleeve clan close together. Leroy, aged 10-11 during most of the 1940s, is the all-American boy who grudgingly practices his piano lessons, gets bad report cards, fights with his friends and cannot remember to not slam the door. Although he is loyal to his Uncle Mort, he is always the first to deflate his ego with a well-placed "Ha!!!" or "What a character!" Beginning in the Spring of 1949, he finds himself in junior high and is at last allowed to grow up, establishing relationships with the girls in the Bullard home across the street. From an awkward adolescent who hangs his head, kicks the ground and giggles whenever Brenda Knickerbocker comes near, he transforms himself overnight (November 28, 1951) into a more mature young man when Babs Winthrop (both girls played by Barbara Whiting) approaches him about studying together. From then on, he branches out with interests in driving, playing the drums and dreaming of a musical career. THIS EPISODE: October 5, 1941. "Investigating The City Jail" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Kraft Parkay Margarine. Gildy tries to get himself arrested so he can check up on municipal graft, but it's not as easy as it sounds! Harold Peary, Jim Bannon (announcer). 29:37.

DATE: Fri, 10 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.86 MB
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The Martin & Lewis Show - Guest Is Marlene Dietrich (03-21-52)

Guest Is Marlene Dietrich (Aired March 21, 1952) Martin and Lewis were the hottest act in America during the early '50s, but the pace and the pressure took their toll. Dean usually had the thankless job of the straight man, and his singing had yet to develop into his unique style of his later years. The critics praised Lewis, and while they admitted that Martin was the best partner he could have, most of them claimed that Lewis was the real talent of the team and could succeed with anyone. It is worth noting that Lewis always praised his partner, and while he appreciated the attention he was getting, he has always said with complete conviction that the act would never have worked without Martin.[citation needed] In the book Dean & Me Lewis calls Martin one of the great comic geniuses of all time. After five years at Paramount Pictures, Dean Martin was becoming tired of scripts limiting him to colorless romantic leads while the stories centered on the antics of Jerry Lewis. Martin also noticed that Lewis was playing comedy scenes for pathos and greed and staging more of the action himself, having lost vision of what their comedy team-up was all about in the first place. The last straw came when Look Magazine gave Martin and Lewis a cover photo -- and cropped Martin out of the picture, humiliating Martin. Martin dutifully fulfilled the rest of his movie contract, but put less and less enthusiasm into his work and becoming increasingly disillusioned about his partnership with Lewis, leading to escalating arguments with Lewis. The two finally couldn't possibly work together, especially when Martin angrily told his partner that he was "nothing to me but a fucking dollar sign." Martin left the act at his first opportunity, on July 25, 1956 (10 years to the day after the first official teaming, even though they performed together before). Hollywood or Bust was their final film released in late 1956. THIS EPISODE: March 21, 1952. "Special Guest Is Marlene Dietrich" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Chesterfield, Anacin, Dentyne. The first tune is, "When You're Smiloing." Dick Stabile and His Orchestra, Jimmy Wallington (announcer), Ed Simmons (writer), Norman Lear (writer), Dick Mack (producer, director), Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Marlene Dietrich (guest). 29:48.

DATE: Thu, 09 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.10 MB
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Your's Truly Johnny Dollar - The Carisio Diamond Matter (06-08-50)

The Carisio Diamond Matter (Aired June 8, 1950) On October 3, 1955, after a hiatus of over a year, the show came back with a vengeance. A new production team, including director/writer Jack Johnstone, a new star, Bob Bailey, from the radio series Let George Do It, and a new format would set the series apart from its competitors. Johnny's cases were now a continuing serial, five days a week, for fifteen minutes each evening. With 75 minutes of airtime, minus commercials and openings and closings, there was sufficient time to develop good storylines and interesting characters. During this time, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar attracted some of the best writers in Hollywood, including Jack Johnstone, E. Jack Neuman (using the pen name John Dawson), Robert Ryf, and Les Crutchfield. Bob Bailey also wrote a script while he was playing Johnny Dollar. He used the pen name Robert Bainter (Bainter was his middle name) as the scriptwriter for "The Carmen Kringle Matter", which was aired on Saturday, December 21, 1957 on the West Coast, and on the following day for the rest of the country. Bob Bailey, generally thought of as the most popular of the Johnny Dollars, brought a new interpretation to the character – tough, but not hard-boiled; streetwise, but not overly cynical, Bailey's Dollar was smart and gritty when he had to be. But Bailey's Johnny Dollar was also human. His character would get emotionally involved in a number of his cases. He had a streak of impatience, and would occasionally not fully listen to a witness and rush off on a tangent before realizing his mistake. The weekday serialized episodes are generally acknowledged as some of the finest radio detective shows ever produced. There were fifty six multi-part shows in all: fifty four five-part shows, one six-part show, and one nine-part show. The serialized episodes continued until November 2, 1956 when the series again reverted to a once a week, thirty minute format. Bob Bailey continued in the lead, until "The Empty Threat Matter" of November 27, 1960, when the Hollywood run ended. Show Notes From Calfkiller" THIS EPISODE: June 8, 1950. CBS network. "The Collegio Diamond Matter". Sustaining. The fabulous gem, worth $200,000 has been stolen. Everyone who has owned the diamond has been killed, including Mr. Benson, the current owner. Edmond O'Brien, Virginia Gregg, Stacy Harris, Jaime del Valle (producer, director), Gil Doud (writer), David Ellis (writer), Leith Stevens (composer, conductor), Wally Maher, Jane Webb, William Johnstone, Bill Bouchey, Harry Bartell. 29:42.

DATE: Thu, 09 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.68 MB
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Granby's Green Acres - Granby Discovers Electricity (07-17-50)

Granby Discovers Electricity (Aired July 17, 1950) Broadcast History: July 3 - August 21, 1950, CBS. 30m, Mondays at 9:30. Cast: Gale Gordon and Bea Benaderet as John and Martha Granby, ex-bank teller and wife who moved to the country to become farmers. Louise Erickson as Janice, their daughter. Parley Baer as Eb, the hired hand. Announcer: Bob LeMond Music: Opie Cates Writer-Producer-Director: Jay Sommers. Granby's Green Acres grew out of characters played by Gale Gordon and Bea Benaderet on the Lucille Ball series My Favorite Husband. The names were changed, but the basic characters remained the same. THIS EPISODE: July 17, 1950. CBS network. "Mr. Granby Discovers Electricity". Sustaining. Granby decides an electric milker is needed for his farm. The announcer (possibly Johnny Jacobs) almost gives the wrong system cue. Gale Gordon, Bea Benaderet, Parley Baer, Louise Erickson, Horace Murphy, Herb Vigran, Jay Summers (writer, director), Jack Harvey (writer), Dave Swift (writer), Opie Cates (composer, conductor), Johnny Jacobs (announcer). 29:48.

DATE: Thu, 09 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.87 MB
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The Avenger - The Ghost Murders (08-17-45)

The Ghost Of Murders (Aired August 17, 1945) The Avenger is a fictional character whose original adventures appeared from 1939 to 1942 in The Avenger magazine, published by Street and Smith Publications. Five additional short stories were published in Clues Detective magazine from 1942 to 1943, and a sixth novelette in The Shadow magazine in 1943. Newly-written adventures were commissioned and published by Warner Brother's Paperback Library from 1973 to 1974. The Avenger was a pulp hero who combined elements of Doc Savage and The Shadow though he was never as popular as either of these characters. The authorship of the pulp series was credited by Street and Smith to Kenneth Robeson, the same byline that appeared on the Doc Savage stories. The "Kenneth Robeson" name was a house pseudonym used by a number of different Street & Smith writers. Most of the original Avenger stories were written by Paul Ernst. THIS EPISODE: August 17, 1945. Program #11. Michelson syndication. "The Ghost Murders". Music fill for local commercial insert. Charles Michelson (producer), Walter Gibson (writer), Ruth Braun (writer), Gilbert Braun (writer), James Monks, Helen Adamson, Alyn Edwards (announcer), Doc Whipple (organist). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Thu, 09 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.42 MB
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Box 13 - The Dowager And Dan Holiday (01-16-49)

The Dowager And Dan Holiday (Aired January 16, 1949) Box 13 is still one of the most highly collected--but poorly documented--radio programs from that Golden Age. The sound quality in most exemplar recordings is superb, so it's apparent that someone loved Box 13 once upon a time. Frankly, we love it because the scripts, pace and situations are excellent. Add the 'noir' element of Alan Ladd's voice and you have all the radio noir aficionado needs to while away (yes, 'while away' not wile away--we're old school here) 26 hours. The production values throughout all 52 episodes were absolutely superb. The review at left refers to a somewhat 'inscrutable' quality to Alan Ladd's big and little screen performances. But in the world of radio noir, less is usually more. In the gritty, dark alleys and dives that the radio noir detectives habituated there was as much to be observed in the shadows as in the light. Perhaps we're just 'glass half full' types, but we've always enjoyed Box 13 immensely. Alan Ladd's early portrayals of Dan Holiday did tend to be a bit pat, somewhat sparse in depth, and even wooden in the beginning. Ladd hired some excellent voice talent for his project, and these superb, veteran Radio professionals set a pretty high bar for Ladd, himself. Box 13 is highly expositional, as are most programs of the genre, and Ladd's grovelly, gritty voice lends itself well to the production. But by Episode #6 it seems apparent that Alan Ladd was beginning to hit his stride in the role. What seems to get in the way for many reviewers of this program is its somewhat implausible premise. Dan Holiday was purportedly a successful fiction writer for the Star-Times news magazine who becomes disenchanted with the utter, mind-numbing routine of it. Dan Holiday opts out. He posts an ad reading "Go anywhere, Do anything, Write Box 13". This had become a pretty well-worked theme by 1948. Perhaps a bit too reminiscent of George Valentine's "Personal notice: Danger's my stock in trade. If the job's too tough for you to handle, you've got a job for me. George Valentine," from 1946's Let George Do It. The gimmick certainly made for an open-ended range of potential adventures for Box 13's protagonist. And it resulted in some pretty outrageous assignments in the course of Holiday's fifty-two adventures. But adventures they are, which perhaps sets this erstwhile detective genre program as more of an adventure genre. Holiday isn't a detective per se. And it's clear that he's still interested in making some dough off the back end of his adventures--all perfect fodder for the Men's Adventure magazines so much the vogue throughout the 1940s and 1950s. THIS EPISODE: January 16, 1949. Program #22. Mutual net origination, Mayfair syndication. "The Dowager and Dan Holiday". Commercials added locally. Mrs. Matilda Courtland, one of the wealthiest women in the world, announces her engagement to Dan Holiday! Alan Ladd, Richard Sanville (director), Rudy Schrager (composer, conductor), Russell Hughes (writer), Sylvia Picker, Vern Carstensen (production supervisor). 27:35.

DATE: Wed, 08 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.31 MB
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The Clock - The Hypnotist (07-06-47)

The Hypnotist (Aired July 6, 1947) The Clock should have been one of the more popular supernatural dramas of the late 1940s. The production values were reasonably high, the supporting talent was superb, much of the run was produced and directed by William Spier, and the concept was certainly unique enough. 'What if' programs, or dramatic programming dealing with 'fate' and its consequences weren't new to Radio of the 1940s. Indeed, the more common subtexts of most of the supernatural dramatizations throughout the Golden Age of Radio dealt with either the consequences of fate, or both historic and contemporary turning points of either 'conscience' or 'morals.' Nor are such themes particularly unique to the 20th and 21st centuries. Since the beginning of recorded thought and word, mankind has both cherished and preserved its morality tales, cautionary tales, proverbs, fables and folklore wherein the focus of the tale is mankind's universal dilemma in facing the right and wrong of an issue. Supernatural radio dramas of the era in particular seemed to concentrate on mankind's inherent ability to choose his or her path when faced with moral issues. There was invariably a tradionally more difficult, but morally correct path to take, as opposed to the easier, more attractive path--for almost always the wrong reasons. Network Radio crime dramas of the era mandated a predictable outcome: "you do the crime you do the time," "crime does not pay," etc. Supernatural dramas, for the most part, focused on the moral options of a plot. Nor were such themes strictly limited to the supernatural drama genre. The recurring popularity of science fiction dramas of the era quite often focused on these same eternal themes, projected in a 'future tense,' as were popularized with both Dimension X and X Minus One during the 1950s. The ABC Network, entering the competition for Radio network audiences as relatively late as it did, embarked on many attempts to kickstart its own, unique programming initiatives from 1946 forward, especially. Known for its predominantly 'counter-programming' strategies, young ABC was almost continually attempting to unseat--to one degree of success or another--its network competition by creating programming counter to the targeted timeslots and demographics it was attempting to wrestle away from its then three, long-standing network competitors. Show Notes From The Digital Deli THIS EPISODE: July 6, 1947. Syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Hypnotist". Participating sponsors. Post-hypnotic murders. A Svengaliesque story. WRVR rebroadcast date: August 24, 1973. The date above is the date of broadcast on ABC. . 1/2 hour.

DATE: Wed, 08 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.72 MB
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Fibber McGee & Molly - 2 Episodes (02-12-54) (02-17-54)

Renting Mr. Ingram's House - 2 Episodes (02-12-54) (02-17-54) Fibber McGee and Molly was a popular radio show during the era of classic, old-time radio. It was one of the longest-running comedies in the history of classic radio in the United States. The series premiered on NBC in 1935 and remained popular until its demise in 1959, long after radio had ceased to be the dominant form of entertainment in American popular culture. James "Jim" Jordan (16 November 1896–1 April 1988) and Marian Driscoll (15 April 1898–7 April 1961), were natives of Peoria, Illinois who met in church and married in 1918. The genesis of Fibber McGee and Molly occurred when the small-time husband-and-wife vaudevillians began their third year as Chicago-area radio performers. Two of the shows they did for station WENR beginning in 1927, both written by Harry Lawrence, bore traces of what was to come and rank as one of the earliest forms of situation comedy. In their Luke and Mirandy farm-report program, Jim played a farmer who was given to tall tales and face-saving lies for comic effect. In a weekly comedy, The Smith Family, Marian's character was an Irish wife of an American police officer. These characterizations, plus the Jordans' change from being singers/musicians to comic actors, pointed toward their future. The Jordans teamed with Donald Quinn, an unemployed cartoonist the couple hired as their writer in 1931. For station WMAQ in Chicago, beginning in April 1931, the trio created Smackout, a 15-minute daily program which centered on a general store and its proprietor, Luke Grey (Jim Jordan), a storekeeper with a penchant for tall tales and a perpetual dearth of whatever his customers wanted: He always seemed "smack out of it." Marian Jordan portrayed both a lady named Marian and a little girl named Teeny, as well as playing musical accompaniment on piano. Smackout was picked up for national airing by the National Broadcasting Company in April 1933, and the show endured until August 1935. A member of the S.C. Johnson company's owners, Henrietta Johnson Lewis, married to the advertising executive who handled the Johnson's Wax account, recommended that her husband, John, give the show a chance as a national program for the company. Much of the show's humor relied on recurring gags, unseen regulars and punchlines that sometimes popped up here and there for years. The show would usually open the 29-and-a-half minute broadcast with the audience in full laughter with Harlow Wilcox announcing, "The Johnson's Wax Program with Fibber McGee and Molly!" The episode of December 19, 1944, "Fibber Snoops For Presents In Closet" (at 3:59 is a perfect example of the "Hall Closet," a running gag described in detail later in this entry), Jim Jordan can be caught at the end of his audience warm-up evoking the opening laughter by quipping, "10 seconds? Oh, we got a lot of.... Ooooo!" TODAY'S SHOW: February 12, 1954. NBC network. Sustaining. Fibber trys to rent Mr. Ingram's house for him. A professor is a likely prospect. Jim Jordan, Marian Jordan, Phil Leslie (writer), Ralph Goodman (writer), Max Hutto (director), John Wald (announcer), Jack Kruschen. 13:54. February 17, 1954. NBC network. Sponsored by: Richard Hudnut. At last, Fibber rents the house for Mr. Ingram. Jim Jordan, Marian Jordan, Phil Leslie (writer), Ralph Goodman (writer), Max Hutto (director), John Wald (announcer), Bill Thompson, Arthur Q. Bryan. 14:45.

DATE: Wed, 08 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.84 MB
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Casey Crime Photographer - The Loaded Dice (09-04-47)

The Loaded Dice (Aired September 4, 1947) Casey very much owed its success over the years to its underlying ensemble of Alonzo Deen Cole's scripts, Staats Cotsworth's realistic portrayal of Jack Casey, and Ethelbert's comic relief. The Ann Williams character, variously portrayed by Jone Allison, Alice Reinheart, Lesley Woods, Betty Furness and finally, Jan Miner, provided the sidekick/love interest element of the ensemble. Another key element of the ensemble was The Blue Note Café itself. The use of a local watering hole to frame a successful ensemble drama has become a tried and true framework over the years. The equally successful Duffy's Tavern (1941-1951) ran for the same length of time as Casey Crime Photographer. For its first two years it ran over the same CBS network that eventually sustained Flashgun Casey and Casey--Press Photographer. We need but to fast-forward a few years to find the same successful framework in Television's Peter Gunn, 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye, All In The Family, and Cheers!. In Casey, The Blue Note Café serves as more than an anchor. It very much frames the interactions between all of Casey's protagonists. The Blue Note Café ambience is provided by several noteworthy jazz and swing performers over the run. The Blue Note Café’s resident pianist was portrayed by Herman Chittison, but Juan Hernandez and Teddy Wilson from The Benny Goodman Trio were also heard over the years. The transitions between the traditional dramatic organ music to the refreshingly upbeat musical background of The Blue Note Café usually served as a waypoint in the script for reflection, recapping the evolution of the script arc, or for the traditional script wrap-up at the end of most programs. The Coxe/CBS Crime Photographer franchise continued on past the Anchor Hocking sponsored run, reprised over both Television and Radio. CBS ran a Television version of Crime Photographer (1951) which saw only John Gibson and Jan Miner reprising their respective roles in Television. Casey's beat was Manhattan instead of Boston in Crime Photographer's television incarnation. Jack Casey [Richard Carlyle] continues his fondness for jazz, and The Blue Note Café continues as the anchor for the Television Casey. The Television scripts were exposited in flashback format, with Casey narrating his latest exploit to Ethelbert the bartender. The 'Morning Express' also makes the transition from Boston to Manhattan, with reporter Ann Williams augmented by cub reporter Jack Lipman. Two months into the Television run, CBS re-cast Casey and Ethelbert, substituting young Darren McGavin as Jack Casey. The most distinguishing element of the short-lived Television Casey was its direction, with the famed future Film Director Sidney Lumet helming the series. THIS EPISODE: September 4, 1947. CBS network. "Loaded Dice". Sponsored by: Anchor Hocking Glass. The story of a pair of galloping dominoes and a three hundred pound corpse lying on top of them! Alonzo Deen Cole (writer), Archie Bleyer (music), Herman Chittison (piano), Jan Miner, John Dietz (director), John Gibson, Staats Cotsworth, Tony Marvin (announcer), Bernard Lenrow, Byron Winget (sound effects), Jerry McCarty (sound efects), William Pearson (engineer), Arthur Vinton, George Harmon Coxe (creator). 29:28.

DATE: Tue, 07 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.55 MB
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The Story Of Dr. Kildare - Pricilla's Broken Arm (06-22-50)

Pricilla's Broken Arm (Aired June 22, 1950) Dr. Kildare was produced for syndication in 1949 at WMGM, New York. It was based on the popular Dr. Kildare movies of the late 1930's and early 1940's, and brought to the microphone the stars of that series, Lew Ayres and Lionel Barrymore. Ayres played the young, idealistic Dr. James Kildare; Barrymore, ever in character, was the crusty, loveable diagnostician, Dr. Leonard Gillespie. The men worked at Blair General Hospital, "one of the great citadels of American medicine -- a clump of gray-white buildings planted deep in the heart of New York -- where life begins, where life ends, where life goes on." Kildare really believed that oath, and that's what this series was all about. His battle with hospital administration, stupid patients, and stupid parents made this the Marcus Welby of the 1940's. The chief problem, both for Kildare and the listener, was that Blair Hospital was peopled by too many eccentrics. Gillespie, played to the limit by Barrymore, was enough for any show. But Dr. Carew, head of hospital administration, was a nut of the first order. Nurse Parker was a totally unbelievable old maid. Ted Osborne did what he could with Carew, and Virginia Gragg's fine talent was hopelessly lost in the chattering role of Parker. In the end, Ayres and Barrymore saved this series, providing some solid stories, especially when they ventured into the real world and got away from the dummies at Blair. Writing and directing were done on a freelance basis; music was by Walter Schumann. Actors contributing to Dr. Kildare included Stacy Harris, Isabel Jewell, Jay Novello, George Ellis, Paul Frees, Raymond Burr, and Jack Webb. (Show Notes From the Old Time Radio Researcher's Group) THIS EPISODE: June 22, 1950. "Pricilla's Broken Arm" - Program #22. WMGM, New York City-Mutual network origination, MGM syndication. Commercials added locally. A young genius with a broken arm learns how to be a human being, and falls in love with Dr. Kildare in the process. Lew Ayres, Lionel Barrymore, Virginia Gregg, Ted Osborne, Sarah Selby, Pattee Chapman, Les Crutchfield (writer), Walter Schumann (composer, conductor), Dick Joy (announcer), William P. Rousseau (director). 28:35.

DATE: Tue, 07 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.86 MB
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A Date With Judy - Gregory Hickson Lecture (10-22-46)

Gregory Hickson Lecture (Aired October 22, 1946) A Date with Judy was a comedy radio series aimed at a teenage audience which had a long run from 1941 to 1950. The show began as a summer replacement for Bob Hope's show, sponsored by Pepsodent and airing on NBC from June 24 to September 16, 1941, with 14-year-old Ann Gillis in the title role. Dellie Ellis portrayed Judy when the series returned the next summer (June 23 – September 15, 1942). Louise Erickson took over the role the following summer (June 30 – September 22, 1943) when the series, with Bristol Myers as its new sponsor, replaced The Eddie Cantor Show for the summer. Louise Erickson continued in the role of Judy over the next seven years as the series, sponsored by Tums, aired from January 18, 1944 to January 4, 1949. Ford Motors and Revere Cameras were the sponsors for the final season of the radio series on ABC from October 13, 1949 to May 25, 1950. As the popularity of the radio series peaked, Jane Powell starred as Judy in the 1948 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer movie A Date with Judy. Elizabeth Taylor, Wallace Beery, Robert Stack and Carmen Miranda also headed the cast. A television version of the show ran on ABC on Saturdays during daytime hours beginning on June 2, 1951. It originally starred Pat Crowley as Judy. The series moved to prime time during the summer of 1952 and was brought back again midway through the 1952-53 season. The series ended its run on September 30, 1953. This version featured Mary Linn Beller as Judy, John Gibson and Flora Campbell as her parents, Peter Avramo as her brother, and Jimmy Sommers as her sort-of boyfriend Oogie. A Date with Judy also had a long run as a comic book based on the radio and TV series. It was published by National Periodical Publications from October-November 1947 to October-November 1960. There were 79 issues. THIS EPISODE: October 22, 1946. "Gregory Hickson Lecture" - NBC network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. Trying to avoid a lecture on international relations, Mr. Foster finds himself obligated to buy a diamond bracelet. Louise Erickson, John Brown. 30:06.

DATE: Tue, 07 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.83 MB
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Crime Does Not Pay - Operation Payroll (02-28-51)

Operation Payroll (Aired February 28, 1951) As must be immediately noticeable from the long list of movie actors heard in Crime Does Not Pay, this was not your everyday Golden Age Radio drama. Indeed, you might be forgiven if you fail to recognize more than a couple of Radio voice talents in the entire list. The Radio program was based on a very popular series of MGM Short Subjects they produced between 1935 and 1948 under the same name, Crime Does Not Pay. The Marcus Loew Booking Agency had owned radio station call sign WHN since 1946. In September of 1948, WHN changed their call sign to WMGM, in part to capitalize on a series of MGM programming projects they were attempting to introduce to a national audience. Programs such as The Adventures of Maisie, Crime Does Not Pay, MGM Theatre of The Air, and Dr. Kildare, all drew on material that MGM, as a Film Studio, already had in the can. Having established MGM Transcriptions for the express purpose of transcribing, then syndicating this content, all that remained was for them to obtain a well-established radio station from which to put their programs on the air. The assumption was that once heard in a wide enough area they'd be picked up nationwide in due time. The concept seemed to be working for several years, until a change in MGM focus made their MGM Transcriptions division redundant. WMGM slowly began changing their format to remain viable to its growing local audience, and the era of MGM-produced, network-ready, syndicated content dwindled to nothing. MGM Short Subjects had been a highly bankable asset for MGM. They also served as a 'farm club' for much of MGM's up and coming talent. Four of MGM's most popular Shorts were Our Gang, The Passing Parade, with John Nesbitt, the Oscar-winning Pete Smith Specialties, and Crime Does Not Pay. MGM made at least fifty Crime Does Not Pay short subjects. Whatever the medium, Crime Does Not Pay seems to have touched a nerve with the American public. With another world war looming, suspected 'fifth columnists' around every corner, and scams from the post-Depression years still running their course throughout the country, there was plenty of material from which to draw for MGM's Shorts Division. Show Notes Taken From The Digital Deli THIS EPISODE: February 28, 1951. Program #73. MGM syndication. "Operation Payroll". Commercials added locally. The date above is the date of the first broadcast of the program on WMGM, New York, from which this syndicated version may have been taken. Two brothers go in opposite directions and meet in sadness. Harold Vermilyea, Bob Williams (announcer), Marx B. Loeb (director), Ira Marion (writer), Jon Gart (composer, conductor), Burton B. Turkas (technical advisor). 26:38.

DATE: Mon, 06 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.65 MB
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Diary Of Fate - Edward Matthews (03-30-48)

Edward Matthews (Aired March 30, 1948) The twist with Diary of Fate was the total absence of pretense. The program jumps right to the 'source' of Man's ultimate destiny--Fate itself--in the form of the Guardian of the Diary of Fate. It is within the Diary of Fate, that every soul's fate is painstakingly chronicled by book and page number--or so we're very persuasively given to understand. Fate itself--in this instance, at least--is the great character actor Herbert Lytton, providing the forboding vocal gravitas we might expect from such an all-powerful cosmic force. Produced from Hollywood, the entire production was voiced by primarily west coast actors. Famous Radio and Television promoter Larry Finley produced and syndicated the program to at least some 94 affiliate stations throughout the U.S., Canada and Jamaica. Most local or regional broadcasts were either sustained offerings by an independent affiliate, or were sponsored by spot advertisers ranging over a wide variety of offerings or services. The production didn't stint on talent, as hinted above. No less than Ivan Ditmars provided the music direction and in addition to Herb Lytton as 'Fate', the varying casts included Lurene Tuttle, Larry Dobkin, Hal Sawyer, Gloria Blondell, Frank Albertson, Jerry Hausner, Howard McNear, Peter Leeds, Ken Peters, Daws Butler and William Johnstone. All in all a superb well of talent from which to draw each week. While a bit difficult to document, the production remains quite collectable and the perspective of the presentation is also unique for the era--or since for that matter. Diary of Fate is one of Radio's little, oft-overlooked gems that demand pulling out, polishing up for better enjoyment, then dutifully returning them to their preserve for another airing one day in the future. THIS EPISODE: March 30, 1948. Program #16. Finley syndication. "Edward Matthews". Commercials added locally. Book 83, page 227. A farmer faces hard work and poor prospects. Selling the farm and moving to the city, Edward Matthews chooses evil. The date is subject to correction. Larry Finley (producer), Herb Lytton, Virginia Gregg, Horace Murphy, Ray Ehrlenborn (probable sound effects), Ivan Ditmars (organ), Hal Sawyer. 28:24.

DATE: Mon, 06 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.00 MB
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Duffy's Tavern - Special Guest Is Fred Allen (01-04-44)

Special Guest Is Fred Allen (Aired January 4, 1944) Duffy's Tavern, an American radio situation comedy (CBS, 1941–1942; NBC-Blue Network, 1942–1944; NBC, 1944–1951), often featured top-name stage and film guest stars but always hooked those around the misadventures, get-rich-quick-scheming, and romantic missteps of the title establishment's malaprop-prone, metaphor-mixing manager, Archie, played by the writer/actor who co-created the show, Ed Gardner. The final show on radio was broadcast on December 28, 1951. In the show's familiar opening, "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," either solo on an old-sounding piano or by a larger orchestra, was interrupted by the ring of a telephone and Gardner's New Yorkese accent as he answered, "Hello, Duffy's Tavern, where the elite meet to eat. Archie the manager speakin'. Duffy ain't here — oh, hello, Duffy." Duffy, the owner, was never heard (or seen, when a film based on the show was made in 1945 or when a bid to bring the show to television was tried in 1954). But Archie always was — bantering with Duffy's man-crazy daughter, Miss Duffy (played by several actresses, beginning with Gardner's real-life first wife, Shirley Booth); with Eddie, the waiter/janitor (Eddie Green); and, especially, with Clifton Finnegan (Charlie Cantor, later Sid Raymond), a likeable soul with several screws loose and a knack for falling for every other salesman's scam. The show featured many high-profile guest stars, including Fred Allen, Mel Allen, Nigel Bruce, Billie Burke, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Boris Karloff, Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, Peter Lorre, Tony Martin, Marie McDonald, Gene Tierney, Arthur Treacher and Shelley Winters. Duffy's Tavern was Gardner's creation, and he oversaw its writing intently enough, drawing also on his earlier experience as a successful radio director. His directing credits included stints for George Burns and Gracie Allen, Ripley's Believe It or Not, and The Rudy Vallee Hour. Gardner also brought aboard several keen writing talents, including theatric humourist Abe Burrows (the show's co-creator and head writer for its first five years), future M*A*S*H writer Larry Gelbart, and Dick Martin, who later became famous as the co-host of television's groundbreaking Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In. THIS EPISODE: January 4, 1944. "Special Guest Is Fred Allen" - Blue network, KECA, Los Angeles aircheck. Sponsored by: Minit-Rub, Sal Hepatica. The program is upcut when the recording begins with the Ginny Sims Show in error. Guest Fred Allen is invited to host "Duffy's Semi-Annual Spring Festival and Pig Roast." But first, an audition for Duffy is required. Ed Gardner, Dan Seymour (announcer), Benay Venuta, Florence Halop, Peter Van Steeden and His Orchestra, Eddie Green, Charlie Cantor, Fred Allen. 30:15.

DATE: Mon, 06 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.38 MB
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Bold Venture - Mutineers Of The Marino Victory (11-05-51)

Mutineers Of The Marino Victory (Aired November 5, 1951) Bold Venture was a classy production from start to finish. At an estimated cost of $36,000 per taping week [or about $12,000 per episode], it pretty much had to have been. Even subtracting the Bogarts' contribution of $5,000 per episode, that still left $7,000 per episode to fund the remaining production costs. That's about $420,000 a week in today's dollars. More than enough budget to ensure a top notch production. The cost to the sponsor-subscribers reportedly varied between $25 a week to as much as $250 a week, depending on the size and reach of the target market(s). That would have yielded anywhere from $975,000 to $9.75M over the course of three years of Bold Venture's sales. Even arbitrarily averaging the varying theoretical sales would have yielded on the order of at least $5M to Ziv and company over three years. Subtracting even $1M in production and marketing costs would have yielded at least a $4M profit. Though still only trickling into circulation from the existing 78-program run, as the number of circulating programs expand, so does interest in them. If you're already a fan of the Bogarts' chemistry this series simply reinforces that magic--and in a somewhat more intimate way. But even if you can take the Bogarts or leave them, the combination of Caribbean setting, interesting and fast moving plots, and absolutely superb production values make the better recordings from this syndicated production very entertaining indeed. Radio wasn't the end of the line for Bold Venture. Ziv Television syndicated a William Conrad-directed Television version of Bold Venture from 1959 to 1960. Dane Clark portrayed Slate Shannon. Television's version of Shannon was an ex-Marine who ran a small hotel and charter service in Trinidad, since the dynamics between the U.S. and Cuba had already begun a marked decline by 1959. Joan Marshall portrayed Sailor Duval and Bernie Gozier portrayed 'King' Moses.

DATE: Sun, 05 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.70 MB
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Dangerous Assignment - The Empty Matchbook (12-02-50)

The Empty Matchbook (Aired December 2, 1950) Dangerous Assignment stands as one of the most durable programs of its genre and era in the waning days of The Golden Age of Radio. Espionage or foreign intrigue dramas weren't particularly groundbreaking undertakings by the 1950s. Bulldog Drummond was the first of the more successful exemplars of Radio espionage and intrigue, running from 1941 to 1954, most often under the lead of the gifted character actor, George Coulouris. The Counterspy series had been well underway since 1942 and ran in one incarnation or another through 1954. The Man Called X had already aired--to great popular and critical acclaim--for almost five years prior to 1949. Indeed, within a year of airing Dangerous Assignment's Summer 1949 season, The Man Called X returned to the air for another two years. For one of those years, Dangerous Assignment and The Man Called X ran back to back in the NBC line-up. Of the two foreign intrigue anthologies, NBC seemed to continue to favor the Herbert Marshall drama, The Man Called X. Whether in deference to Marshall's seniority, its former high ratings between 1944 and 1948, or simply out of perceived popularity, Dangerous Assignment, while airing ahead of The Man Called X, never seemed to get the buildup that The Man Called X invariably received. It may well have been as simple as a lack of sponsorship. For much of 1950 and 1951, both Dangerous Assignment and The Man Called X remained either network sustained or shared the sponsorship of Ford, Anacin, Chesterfield, and RCA Victor. Wheaties sponsored virtually the entire weekday, nighttime NBC line-up for three months, but Dangerous Assignment ran for the most part, network sustained for over half of its entire run. NBC transcribed Dangerous Assignment for syndication via its NBC Orthacoustic Transcription Series. NBC's Orthacoustic transcriptions are the source of most of the surviving recordings. Show Notes From Digital Deli

DATE: Sun, 05 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.75 MB
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The Black Museum - The Pink Powder Puff (1952)

The Pink Powder Puff (1952) *Exact Date Is Unknown The Black Museum had much to recommend it. First and foremost, Orson Welles' stirring narratives, framing, and exposition were head and shoulders above the competition. Clive Brook for all of the authenticity his natural British voice and accent lent to Secrets of Scotland Yard, nevertheless wasn't given the dramatic latitude that Orson Welles was. But this was very much by design. Clive Brook's expositions on Secrets of Scotland Yard were more of an historical nature, whereas Orson Welles' expositions, due to the more morbid and gruesome cases selected for The Black Museum, clearly had more to work with. The limited run also benefitted Welles more than the 110-plus installments of Secrets of Scotland Yard had benefitted Clive Brook. It should also be noted that when the Mutual Broadcasting System made its deal with MGM Radio Attractions for a limited subset of The Black Museum, it very much cherry-picked the best thirty-eight episodes of the run for Mutual's broadcasts, hence Orson Welles' exposure on The Black Museum was both more limited and selective. There's little argument about the relative strengths of the competing programs' expositors. But how did they stack up in content and authencity? Noted Crime Reporter Percy Hoskins of London's Daily Express was integral to the development of both WHItehall 1212 and Secrets of Scotland Yard. To that end, it's worth noting that the more dramatic, morbid, or salacious elements of The Black Museum's presentations aren't nearly as exacting in detail or as precise in background as those of Secrets of Scotland Yard and WHItehall 1212. Nor, one might well argue, should they have been. By the time that The Black Museum aired, both Whitehall 1212 and Secrets of Scotland Yard had broadcast virtually all of the crimes behind The Black Museum's scripts. They didn't so much steal The Black Museum's thunder as much as virtually demand that The Black Museum take a run at those same historic crimes from an entirely different angle. And in many cases, that's precisely what The Black Museum's writer, Ira Marion did. THIS EPISODE: 1952. Program #12. Syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Pink Powder Puff". The life story of a rogue and murderer, who tells of his criminal history while waiting to be hanged. The date is approximate. Syndicated rebroadcast date: December 4, 1974. Orson Welles (narrator), Harry Alan Towers (producer), Ira Marion (writer), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor). 29:26.

DATE: Sun, 05 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.16 MB
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Vanishing Point - Ground Zero (04-19-85)

Ground Zero (Aired April 19, 1985) Vanishing Point is the title of a science fiction anthology series that ran on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio from 1984 until 1986, although the show would continue under different names and formats. A descriptive intro declared that Vanishing Point. The series was produced by Bill Lane in the CBC's Toronto studios. 1984-1986 There were 69 episodes in the original series. The series continued after that under various names and formats. "The point between reality and fantasy. Where imagination holds the key to new worlds. That point of no return---The Vanishing Point." Favorably compared to Rod Sterling's classic TV series, The Twilight Zone, these finely tuned radio dramas from the CBC provide compelling excursions into the realm of mystery and fantasy.

DATE: Sat, 04 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.80 MB
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The Alan Young Show - Stolen Pearl Necklace (10-04-46)

Stolen Pearl Necklace (Aired October 4, 1946) The Alan Young Show was a radio and television series presented in diverse formats over a nine-year period and starring Canadian-English actor Alan Young. It began on NBC radio as a summer replacement situation comedy in 1944, featuring vocalist Bea Wain. It moved to ABC with Jean Gillespie portraying Young's girlfriend Betty. The program was next broadcast by NBC for a 1946-47 run and was off in 1948. When it returned to NBC in 1949, Louise Erickson played Betty and Jim Backus was heard as snobbish playboy Hubert Updike III. In 1950 The Alan Young Show moved to television as a variety, sketch comedy show, taking an 11-month hiatus in 1952. When it returned for its final season in 1953, the tone and format of the show changed into the more conventional sitcom, with Young playing a bank teller with Dawn Addams cast as his girlfriend and Melville Faber portraying his son. The show alternated weeks with Ken Murray's The Ken Murray Show under the title Time to Smile. In the last two weeks of the season, the format returned to its earlier style, but it was cancelled at the end of the season. The Alan Young Show received two Emmy Awards during its run. Young was born Angus Young in North Shields, Northumberland, to John Cathcart Young, a shipyard worker, and Florence Pinckney, whose ancestors included a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence. The family moved to Edinburgh when Young was a toddler, and later to West Vancouver, British Columbia, when Young was six years old. He came to love radio when bedridden as a child because of severe asthma. Near the start of his radio career, during World War II, Young attempted to enlist in the Royal Canadian Navy, then the Canadian Army, but was rejected due to his ill health. THIS EPISODE: October 4, 1946. "Stolen Pearl Necklace" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Ipana, Vitalis. After Alan gives Betty a pearl necklace, he discovers it's been stolen from wealthy Mrs. Van Skuffington! Alan Young, Charlie Cantor, Doris Singleton, Ken Christy, Jimmy Wallington (announcer), The Smart Set, Jim Backus, Elvia Allman, Jean Gillespie. 29:33.

DATE: Sat, 04 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.95 MB
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The Epic Casebook Of Inspector Carr - An Authors Ending (1957)

An Authors Ending (1957) *The Exact Date Is Unknown The Epic Casebook Of Inspector Carr - The highly successful detective series, starring Hugh Rouse as Inspector Carr. Written & Produced by Michael Silver at the CRC Studios, Johannesburg. The series aired originally on Thursday evenings at 21H30, sponsored by the Epic Oil Company of S.A. In 1977 the sponsorship ended and the series was renamed "Inspector Carr Investigates" and moved to the earlier slot of 20H30. The first actor to play Inspector Carr was Don Davis, he was replaced in 1959 by Hugh Rouse. Don returned briefly in 1963 for 14 episodes. However Hugh Rouse made this series his own. A short lived television series was made by the SABC in the early 1980's with Michael McCabe, playing the famous Inspector. Sadly the transformation from radio to television was a total disaster. The series ended in June 1985 on Springbok Radio. A local Johannesburg radio station, Radio Today 1485am tried to revive the series in 1997, sadly copyright issues could not be cleared up & the idea was abandoned. The series is currently being rebroadcast on the Internet Radio Service of Springbok Radio & can be heard on Thursdays. Show Notes From CalfKiller

DATE: Fri, 03 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.60 MB
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The Jack Benny Program - Jack Has A Toothache (11-12-39)

Jack Has A Toothache (Aired November 12, 1939) Benny had been only a minor vaudeville performer, but he became a national figure with The Jack Benny Program, a weekly radio show which ran from 1932 to 1948 on NBC and from 1949 to 1955 on CBS. It was consistently among the most highly rated programs during most of that run. With Canada Dry Ginger Ale as a sponsor, Benny came to radio on The Canada Dry Program, beginning May 2, 1932, on the NBC Blue Network and continuing there for six months until October 26, moving the show to CBS on October 30. With Ted Weems leading the band, Benny stayed on CBS until January 26, 1933. Arriving at NBC on March 17, Benny did The Chevrolet Program until April 1, 1934. He continued with sponsor General Tire through the end of the season. In October, 1934, General Foods, the makers of Jell-O and Grape-Nuts, became the sponsor most identified with Jack, for the next ten years. American Tobacco's Lucky Strike was his longest-lasting radio sponsor, from October, 1944, through the end of his original radio series. The show returned to CBS on January 2, 1949, as part of CBS president William S. Paley's notorious "raid" of NBC talent in 1948–49. There it stayed for the remainder of its radio run, which ended on May 22, 1955. CBS aired repeats of old radio episodes from 1956 to 1958 as The Best of Benny. Benny's stage character was just about everything the actual Jack Benny was not: cheap, petty, vain, and self-congratulatory. His comic rendering of these traits became the linchpin to the Benny show's success. Benny set himself up as the comedic foil, allowing his supporting characters to draw laughs at the expense of his character's flaws. By allowing such a character to be seen as human and vulnerable, in an era where few male characters were allowed such obvious vulnerability, Benny made what might have been a despicable character into a lovable Everyman character. Benny himself said on several occasions: "I don't care who gets the laughs on my show, as long as the show is funny." In her book, Benny's daughter Joan said her father always said it doesn't matter who gets laughs, because come the next day they will say, "Remember the Jack Benny Show, last night, it was good, or it was bad." Jack felt he got the credit or blame either way, not the actor saying the lines, so it had better be funny.

DATE: Fri, 03 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.69 MB
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Big Town - Death Rides The Highway (03-26-40)

Death Rides The Highway (Aired March 26, 1940) John Dunning called Big Town "perhaps the most famous series of reporter dramas." Premiering over CBS Radio, the early series (there were two) starred the Hollywood actor Edward G. Robinson as Steve Wilson along with Clair Trevor as his sidekick and Society editor, Lorelei Kilbourne. The show was initially created around these two actors, though Trevor was then a young budding actress appearing in movies as well as radio. Producer-Director-Writer Jerry McGill had been a newspaperman and wrote the series about a crusading managing editor of the Illustrated Press. McGill took his show to heart writing stories about juvenile delinquency, drunk driving and racism, though the show was at worst melodramatic at best poignant. Hard-nosed editor, Wilson, as played by Robinson would get the story no matter what it takes. Though sometimes over the top, Robinson was excellent in his role. The stories were well written and directed by William N. Robson as well as McGill. The skill of this group shows in making the series very good radio. The show was a big promoter of the free press and the first amendment with its opening sequence: "Freedom of the press is a flaming sword! Use it justly...hold it high...guard it well!" The second series began immediately in the 1943 season when the production moved from Hollywood to New York. Robinson left (Trevor left two years earlier as her career starting taking off) and McGill reorganized the series placing Edward Pawley in the role of Wilson opposite Fran Carlon as Lorelei. Pawley's Wilson was more mellifluous compared to the rather nasty Robinson. The series' success continued on radio until 1952 leaving only the television version (which began in 1950). (Thanks to Robert G. Corder, author of a new biography of Edward Pawley.) THIS EPISODE: March 26, 1940. Program #42. CBS network. "Death Rides The Highway". Sponsored by: Rinso. Who is the unknown driver who caused a truck to crash into a school bus? The system cue has been deleted, the date is subject to correction. Edward G. Robinson, Ona Munson, Howard Duff (doubles), Leith Stevens (music), Jerry McGill (writer), William N. Robson (director), John Conte (announcer), Ted Osborne, Paula Winslowe. 29:59.

DATE: Fri, 03 Sep 2010
SIZE: 5.72 MB
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In The Name Of The Law - The Robbery (05-31-36)

The Robbery (Aired May 31, 1936) In the Name of the Law was a True Crime radio show from 1936. It says "In the name of the law, we bring you another of the thrilling stories in this exciting series, taken from actual police case files. "In the name of the Law, we bring you another of the thrilling stories in this exciting series, taken from actual police case files."Two home invaders pick the wrong house and force the home owner (John Snyder) to take them to the targeted neighbors, two elderly brothers who were rumored to have cash and bonds. During the hold up, one of the brothers was shot to death. An angry town insisted on immediate results. The State Police joined the local Sherif and the search was on. THIS EPISODE: May 31, 1936. Syndicated. "The Robbery" - Commercials added locally. A double-murder has taken place in the town auditor's office. A special investigator from the Governor's office arrives in town incognito. The acting is primitive. . 25:31.

DATE: Thu, 02 Sep 2010
SIZE: 7.13 MB
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Academy Award Theater - The Maltese Falcon (07-03-46)

The Maltese Falcon (Aired July 3, 1946) The list of films and actors on Academy Award Theater is very impressive. Bette Davis begins the series in Jezebel, with Ginger Rogers following in Kitty Foyle, and then Paul Muni in The Life of Louis Pasteur. The Informer had to have Victor Mclaglen, and the Maltese Falcon, Humphrey Bogart, Sidney Greenstreet (this movie was his first major motion picutre role) plus Mary Astor for the hat trick. Suspicion starred Cary Grant with Ann Todd doing the Joan Fontaine role, Ronald Coleman in Lost Horizon, and Joan Fontaine and John Lund were in Portrait of Jenny. How Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Pinocchio were done is something to hear! Some films are less well known, such as Guest in the House, with Kirk Douglas and Anita Louise, It Happened Tomorrow, with Eddie Bracken and Ann Blythe playing Dick Powell and Linda Darnell's roles, and Cheers for Miss Bishop with Olivia de Havilland. Each adaptation is finely produced and directed by Dee Engelbach, with music composed and conducted by Leith Stevens. Frank Wilson wrote the movie adaptations. John Dunning in his book,"On the Air, The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio,"tells us why such a fine production lasted less than a year: "The House of Squibb, a drug firm, footed a stiff bill: up to $5,000 for the stars and $1,600 a week to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for use of the title. The production had all the class of a Lux or Screen Guild Theater. THIS EPISODE: July 3, 1946. CBS network. "The Maltese Falcon". Sponsored by: Squibb. The classic screenplay brought to radio with the original cast. Bogie's Sam Spade never better, as the search for that fabulous statue continues. This broadcast appears in "Special Features" #22 and #91. Dee Englebach (producer, director), Frank Wilson (adaptor), Gerald Mohr, Hugh Brundage (announcer), Humphrey Bogart, Leith Stevens (composer, conductor), Mary Astor, Sydney Greenstreet. 29:49.

DATE: Thu, 02 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.66 MB
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Broadway Is My Beat - The John Stewart Murder Case (03-28-53)

The John Stewart Murder Case (Aired March 28, 1953) Broadway Is My Beat, a radio crime drama, ran on CBS from February 27, 1949 to August 1, 1954. With Anthony Ross portraying Times Square Detective Danny Clover, the show originated from New York during its first three months on the air. The series featured music by Robert Stringer, and scripts by Peter Lyon. John Dietz directed for producer Lester Gottlieb (eventually succeeding him as producer). Bern Bennett was the original announcer. Beginning with the July 7, 1949 episode, the series was broadcast from Hollywood with producer Elliott Lewis directing a new cast in scripts by Morton S. Fine and David Friedkin. The opening theme of "I'll Take Manhattan" introduced Detective Danny Clover (played by Larry Thor), a hardened New York City cop who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle -- the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." Danny Clover narrated the tales of the Great White Way to the accompaniment of music by Wilbur Hatch and Alexander Courage, and the recreation of Manhattan's aural tapestry required the talents of three sound effects technicians (David Light, Ralph Cummings, Ross Murray). Bill Anders was the show's announcer, as was Joe Walters. The supporting cast included regulars Charles Calvert (as Sgt. Gino Tartaglia) and Jack Kruschen (as Sgt. Muggavan), with episodic roles filled by such radio actors as Irene Tedrow, Barney Phillips, Lamont Johnson, Herb Ellis, Hy Averback, Edgar Barrier, Betty Lou Gerson, Harry Bartell, Sheldon Leonard, Martha Wentworth, Lawrence Dobkin and Mary Jane Croft. Stories came to a climax in the lonely hours just before dawn. THIS EPISODE: March 28, 1953. "The John Stewart Murder Case" - CBS network. Sustaining. A man who expects to be killed named John Stewart has been collecting strange things. This is a network version. Larry Thor, Charles Calvert, Jack Kruschen, Elliott Lewis (producer, director), Alexander Courage (composer, conductor), Morton Fine (writer), David Friedkin (writer), Paula Winslowe, Herb Butterfield, Billy Halop, James McCallion, Steve Roberts, Lou Merrill, Bill Anders (announcer). 30:52.

DATE: Thu, 02 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.53 MB
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Crime Club - Serenade Macabre (07-24-47)

Serenade Macabre (Aired July 24, 1947) Since we have no access to Episodes 2 through 8 at present, we can't say precisely when Raymond Edward Johnson passed the Librarian duties to Barry Thomson. All we can say with certainty is that by Episode No. 9, Barry Thomson is heard as the Librarian. For the premiere episode, Raymond Edward Johnson as 'The Librarian' opened the program in a manner very reminiscent of Inner Sanctum. At the close of the presentation for the evening, the Librarian for the Crime Club announced the credits to a phone ringing in the background. Upon finally answering the phone, the Librarian would announce the next presentation and encourage the 'caller' to listen in the following week. The announcer would then encourage the listening audience to hustle down to their favorite bookshop or library and obtain the latest 'crime club' selection. By Episode No. 9, with Barry Thomson as the Librarian, the ringing phone element was presented at the beginning of each broadcast as well, serving as a device to frame both the prologue and epilogue of each presentation. Both Raymond Edward Johnson and Barry Thomson continued to appear in the cast of many of the subsequent programs. As mentioned above, Stedman Coles adapted the majority of the scripts, with Wyllis Cooper and James Erthine filling in as needed. A WOR production, the series' various casts were comprised of some of the East Coast's finest Radio talent, most prominent among them, William Podmore, Irene Hubbard, Alice Frost, Elspeth Eric, Julie Stevens, Mason Adams, Bryna Raeburn, Jack McBride, Dan Ocko, Joe DeSantis, Lawson Zerbe, Al Hodge, Ted Osborne, Joseph Julian, Larry Haines, Chet Stratton, Walter Kinsella, Joan Alexander, Joan Tompkins, King Calder, Stefan Schnabel, and Myron McCormick. Roger Bower produced and directed the vast majority of the programs with MBS stalwart, Jock MacGregor, filling in whenever needed. Though the series failed to attract a sponsor during its post-World War II run, it remains one of the more compelling MBS productions of its era. It was a natural lead-in for either Johnny Madero, Pier 23 or Quiet Please, that followed it in most MBS affiliate markets. MBS also had the good sense to leave it in the same timeslot for the vast majority of its run--Wednesday evenings, just before or after dinner-time in most households. Show Notes From The Digital-Deli THIS EPISODE: July 24, 1947. Mutual network. "Serenade Macabre". Sustaining. A circus triangle story. A murdered lion tamer causes the trouble. Stedman Coles (writer), Raymond Edward Johnson, Joan Tompkins, Cameron Prud'Homme. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Thu, 02 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.25 MB
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The Amos & Andy Show - Andy The Hotel House Detective (09-29-44)

Andy The Hotel House Detective (Aired September 29, 1944) Above all, Correll and Gosden were gifted dramatists. Their plots flowed gradually from one into the next, with minor subplots building in importance until they took over the narrative, before receding to give way to the next major sequence, and seeds for future storylines were often planted months in advance. It was this complex method of story construction that kept the program fresh, and enabled Correll and Gosden to keep their audience in a constant state of suspense. The technique they developed for radio from that of the narrative comic strip endures to the present day as the standard method of storytelling in serial drama. Amos 'n' Andy was officially transferred by NBC from the Blue Network to the Red Network in 1935, although the vast majority of stations carrying the show remained the same. Several months later, Gosden and Correll moved production of the show from NBC's Merchandise Mart studios in Chicago to Hollywood. After a long and successful run with Pepsodent, the program changed sponsors in 1938 to Campbell's Soup; because of Campbell's closer relationship with CBS, the series switched to that network on April 3, 1939. In 1943, after 4,091 episodes, the radio program went from a 15-minute CBS weekday dramatic serial to an NBC half-hour weekly comedy. While the five-a-week show often had a quiet, easygoing feeling, the new version was a full-fledged sitcom in the Hollywood sense, with a regular studio audience (for the first time in the show's history) and an orchestra. More outside actors, including many African American comedy professionals, were brought in to fill out the cast. Many of the half-hour programs were written by Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher, later the writing team behind Leave It To Beaver and The Munsters. In the new version, Amos became a peripheral character to the more dominant Andy and Kingfish duo, although Amos was still featured in the traditional Christmas show where he explains the Lord's Prayer to his daughter. THIS EPISODE: September 29, 1944. NBC network. "Andy The Hotel House Detective Sponsored by: Rinso. The Kingfish gets Andy a job in a hotel as a bell-hop, but Andy thinks he's a private detective and solves a big robbery. Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, Sydney Greenstreet (guest), Harlow Wilcox (announcer). 26:23.

DATE: Wed, 01 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.75 MB
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Escape - Red Wine (08-11-49)

Red Wine (Aired August 11, 1949) Escape was radio's leading anthology series of high adventure, airing on CBS from July 7, 1947 to September 25, 1954. Since the program did not have a regular sponsor like Suspense, it was subjected to frequent schedule shifts and lower production budgets, although Richfield Oil signed on as a sponsor for five months in 1950. Despite these problems, Escape enthralled many listeners during its seven-year run. The series' well-remembered opening combined Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain with the introduction, intoned by Paul Frees and William Conrad: “Tired of the everyday routine? Ever dream of a life of romantic adventure? Want to get away from it all? We offer you... Escape!” Of the more than 230 Escape episodes, most have survived in good condition. Many story premises, both originals and adaptations, involved a protagonist in dire life-or-death straits, and the series featured more science fiction and supernatural tales than Suspense. Some of the memorable adaptations include Algernon Blackwood's "Confession", Ray Bradbury's oft-reprinted "Mars Is Heaven," George R. Stewart's Earth Abides, Richard Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game," F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," John Collier's "Evening Primrose", later adapted to TV as a Stephen Sondheim musical starring Anthony Perkins. Vincent Price and Harry Bartell were heard in the chilling "Three Skeleton Key," the tale of three men trapped in an isolated lighthouse by thousands of rats. The half-hour was adapted from an Esquire short story by the French writer George Toudouze. THIS EPISODE: August 11, 1949. CBS network. "Red Wine". Sustaining. The script was previously used on "Escape" on February 26, 1949. Willard Waterman, Lawrence Dobkin, Vic Perrin, Robert Boone, Wilms Herbert, Lawrence Blochman (author), John Dunkel (adaptor), Norman Macdonnell (director). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Wed, 01 Sep 2010
SIZE: 4.68 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Have Gun Will Travel" - Sense Of Justice (03-29-59)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Have Gun Will Travel" - Sense Of Justice (Aired March 29, 1959) Starring John Dehner as Paladin, Have Gun, Will Travel brought its brand of Western adventure to CBS airwaves from 1957 until 1963. What makes it a rarity, however, is that it was television show for the entire span, but the radio version did not debut until 1958 and left the air in 1960. The supporting cast included Ben Wright as Hey Boy. Virginia Gregg played Missy Wong (Heyboy's girlfriend) and other main roles. The show followed the adventures of Paladin, a gentleman-turned-gunfighter (played by Richard Boone on television, and by John Dehner on radio), who preferred to settle problems without violence, yet, when forced to fight, excelled. Paladin lived in the Carlton Hotel in San Francisco, where he dressed in semi-formal wear, ate gourmet food, and attended opera. In fact, many who initially met him mistook him for a dandy from the East. When working, he dressed in black, used calling cards and wore a holster which carried characteristic chess knight emblems, and carried a derringer under his belt. The knight symbol is in reference to his name — possibly a nickname or working name — and his occupation as a champion-for-hire (see paladin). The theme song of the series refers to him as "a knight without armor." In addition, Paladin drew a parallel between his methods and the chess piece's movement: "It's a chess piece, the most versatile on the board. It can move in eight different directions, over obstacles, and it's always unexpected." Paladin was a former Army officer and a graduate of West Point. He was a polyglot, capable of speaking any foreign tongue required by the plot. He also had a thorough knowledge of ancient history and classical literature, and he exhibited a strong passion for legal principles and the rule of law. THIS EPISODE: March 29, 1959. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "Sense Of Justice". Andy is accused of murder and in jail. Paladin stands up to a lynch mob out to get him...only Andy is an idiot! The script was used on the "Have Gun, Will travel" television show on November 1, 1958. John Dehner, Ben Wright, Virginia Gregg, Harry Bartell, Barney Phillips, Herb Meadow (creator), Sam Rolfe (creator), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), John Dawson (adaptor), Lynn Allen, Richard Perkins, Hugh Douglas (announcer), Richard Perkins, John Kneubuhl (writer), Bill James (sound effects), Tom Hanley (sound effects). 25 minutes.

DATE: Wed, 01 Sep 2010
SIZE: 6.54 MB
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The Adventures Of Maisie - The Truck Driver (12-08-49)

The Truck Driver (Aired December 8, 1949) From the first, MGM wanted Ann Sothern to play Maisie. She began in Hollywood as an extra in 1927. "Maisie and I were just together - I just understood her," Sothern, born Harriette Arlene Lake, said after several of the films made her a star. Throughout the 1930s and '40s, Ann Sothern and Lucille Ball, like many performers in Hollywood, had not one but two careers - one in motion pictures and one on radio. Ann had started in radio as early as 1935, appearing on such variety shows as Rudy Vallee's "The Fleishman Hour" and Bing Crosby's Kraft Music Hall. She also did dramatic parts on "Woodbury Playhouse," "Screen Guild Theatre," and the biggest anthology of them all, Lux Radio Theatre. Throughout the 1940s, the Maisie pictures continued to be released every couple of years. "Your pictures pay for our mistakes," Arthur B. Mayer told her. "And you'll just keep making Maisies as long as you do that." In July, 1945, Ann took Maisie to radio in a half-hour weekly radio for CBS. Famed radio actor Elliott Lewis co-starred as boyfriend Bill, with other parts going to such seasoned radio players as John Brown and Lurene Tuttle. The series ran two seasons, and was revived in 1949 as a syndicated program, now called The Adventures of Maisie. Included in the repertory cast were Hans Conreid (later on Life with Liugi), Sheldon Leonard, Joan Banks, Elvia Allman, Bea Benadaret, and Sandra Gould. The radio show continued in the tried and true Maisie tradition of one part adventure of the emotional kind, one part romance, and one part laughs. To the end Maisie was the single girl, as this allowed her to get involved in continuing adventures of many kinds. These radio adventures of a liberated American "dame" from Brooklyn were tailored to post-WWII, and featured Maisie making her way (and having her way, most of the time) on both sides of the Atlantic. Maisie's favorite comment - "Likewise, I'm sure." Sothern, due in great part to the Maisie films type-casting, would ultimately admit she was "a Hollywood princess, not a Hollywood queen." But in its time, the Maisie series in film and on radio made her known and loved the world over. THIS EPISODE: December 8, 1949. "The Truck Driver" - Program #3. MGM syndication. Commercials added locally. Maisie takes a job driving a truck. Don't miss William Conrad with a Brooklyn accent. The date above is the date of first broadcast on WMGM, New York City. Some of the programs in this series have been described with story titles. There is no evidence that the scripts were ever titled. Alternate program numbers are listed as many syndicated series were numbered more than once over the years. Ann Sothern, William Conrad, Arthur Phillips (writer), Jack McCoy (announcer), Howard McNear, Harry Zimmerman (composer, conductor), Sidney Miller, Mary Jane Croft, Harry Bartell, Herb Vigran, Edwin Max. 28:03.

DATE: Tue, 31 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.24 MB
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The Adventures Of Sam Spade - The Tears Of Night Caper (07-24-49)

The Tears Of Night Caper (Aired July 24, 1949) The Radio version of Sam Spade came to the airwaves in the Summer of 1946 as a Summer replacement for the popular Woody Herman Show. Titled The Adventures of Sam Spade, Detective, Radio's Sam Spade was interpreted by young Howard Duff, a relative newcomer to Network Radio. And although Duff was a relative novice in a featured Network role, he was supported by no less than 'Radio's First Lady', Lurene Tuttle as Effie Perrine and legendary Radio Director William Spier, who'd already made a name for himself with the equally legendary and timeless Suspense series. Gil Doud, Robert Tallman, William Spier, Jason James [as Jo Eisinger], Elliot Lewis, E. Jack Neuman, and Howard Swanton took the writers' credits over the years, fashioning Radio's Sam Spade as a cross between Ricardo Cortez's rogueish Spade and Warren William's wise-cracking, over-the-top Ted Shane from 1936's Satan Met A Lady. Indeed, although the series had a markedly humorous, tongue-in-cheek slant, most of the mysteries--or 'capers'--presented during the production run were wonderfully twisty, convoluted who-dun-its in their own right. There were several other competing, similarly entertaining detective mysteries on Radio at the time. What set Sam Spade apart from most of them was the wonderful interplay between Howard Duff and Lurene Tuttle, masterfully timed and paced by William Spier. And though not characteristically noted for his comedic timing, Spier's crisp, fast-moving direction never truly allowed the occasional slapstick or Tuttle-Duff exchanges to sidetrack the arc of the script. The equally entertaining Let George Do It allowed for a great deal of wise-cracking and droll humor between George Valentine and his own 'Effie', Brooksie. George and Brooksie had a more intentionally romantic slant to their relationship, whereas Effie Perrine had always pretty much reconciled herself to Sam Spade's philandering, while still holding a torch for him. Indeed, Effie's endearing loyalty and concern for Sam became an integral element of the underlying humor of the production as she indefatigably attempts to reform her reprobate employer. Lurene Tuttle is never more of a scene-stealer than in The Adventures of Sam Spade, Detective. And professionally generous to a fault, her on-air self-deprecation, feigned witlessness and blind adoration of Sam Spade, create an unprecedented opportunity for Howard Duff to shine as her drunken, morally and economically challenged scoundrel of a boss. But in yet another perfect marriage of character to actor, Howard Duff manages to pull it all off, despite his character's scurrilous proclivities. By the end of every episode he somehow finds his conscience, solves the mystery at issue, and redeems himself in time to say, "Goodnight, Sweetheart"--and appear to sincerely mean it.Show Notes From The Digital-Deli THIS EPISODE: July 24, 1949. CBS network. "The Tears Of Night Caper". Sponsored by: Wildroot Cream-Oil. A fabulously expensive necklace and several Latin quotes add up to a recipe for trouble for Spade. Howard Duff, Lurene Tuttle, Dashiell Hammett (creator). 28:58.

DATE: Tue, 31 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.79 MB
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Father Knows Best - Big Inheritance (09-17-53)

Big Inheritance (Aired September 17, 1953) The series began August 25, 1949, on NBC Radio. Set in the Midwest, it starred Robert Young as General Insurance agent Jim Anderson. His wife Margaret was first portrayed by June Whitley and later by Jean Vander Pyl. The Anderson children were Betty (Rhoda Williams), Bud (Ted Donaldson) and Kathy (Norma Jean Nillson). Others in the cast were Eleanor Audley, Herb Vigran and Sam Edwards. Sponsored through most of its run by General Foods, the series was heard Thursday evenings on NBC until March 25, 1954. The show is often regarded as an example of the conservative and paternalistic nature of American family life in the 1950s and it is also cited as an overly rosy portrayal of American family life. On the radio program, the character of Jim differs from the later television character. The radio Jim is far more sarcastic and shows he really "rules" over his family. Jim also calls his children names, something common on radio but lost in the TV series; for example, Jim says, "What a bunch of stupid children I have." Margaret is portrayed as a paragon of solid reason and patience, unless the plot calls for her to act a bit off. For example, in a Halloween episode, Margaret cannot understand how the table floats in the air, but that is a rare exception. Betty, on radio, is portrayed as a status seeking, boy-crazy teenage girl. To her, every little thing is "the worst thing that could ever happen." Bud, on radio, is portrayed as an "all-American" boy who always seems to need "just a bit more" money, though he gets $1.25 per week in allowance.

DATE: Tue, 31 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.57 MB
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Danger With Grainger - Skip Lantry's Revenge (1956)

Skip Lantry's Revenge (1956) Drawn from the dramatic files of Steve Grainger is a Private detective whose cases involve him in crime and misdemeanor of every description, from murder to robbery to smuggling. Mutual aired the first show July 23, 1956 on Monday nights at 8:30 pm. The final broadcast was on Frebruary 25, 1957. It was a half hour action filled series of shows that featured private eye Steve Granger operating in New York City. In his investigations Steve Granger cooperates with the police and the FBI and other authorities and can always rely on assistance from his friend Cal Hendricks, a newspaperman, who is only too ready to help - provided he gets his story. THIS EPISODE: "Skip Lantry's Revenge" - 1956. Mutual network. Commercials deleted. The story of a man, Skip Lantry, who believed he could get even with the man that set him up and send him up. He hires Steve Granger to "help". 27:07.

DATE: Mon, 30 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.91 MB
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Barry Craig Confidental Investigator - The Schemers (04-06-54)

The Schemers (Aired April 6, 1954) Originally aired October 31, 1951 Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator is one of the few detective radio series that had separate versions of it broadcast from both coasts. Even the spelling changed over the years. It was first "Barry Crane" and then "Barrie Craig". NBC produced it in New York from 1951 to 1954 and then moved it to Hollywood where it aired from 1954 to 1955. It attracted only occasional sponsors so it was usually a sustainer. William Gargan, who also played the better known television (and radio) detective Martin Kane, was the voice of New York eye BARRY CRAIG while Ralph Bell portrayed his associate, Lt. Travis Rogers. Craig's office was on Madison Avenue and his adventures were fairly standard PI fare. He worked alone, solved cases efficiently, and feared no man. As the promos went, he was "your man when you can't go to the cops. Confidentiality a speciality." Like Sam Spade, Craig narrated his stories, in addition to being the leading character in this 30 minute show. Nearly sixty episodes are in trading circulation today William Gargan as a Detective (and an actor) If William Gargan brought an air of authenticity to his roles as a private detective, there were some good very reasons. His father was a bookmaker, so Gargan learned a lot about the gambling world and met a lot of interesting characters from across the spectrum of society. The main reason why Gargan was so convincing as a detective was that he was probably the only actor of his time who had actually been a private detective. He first worked as a credit investigator and collection agent for a clothing firm. Once Gargan was shot at when he attempted to get a deadbeat customer to pay his overdue account. Next, he worked for about a year as a private detective with a New York agency for "$10.00 a day and expenses." Gargan did many of the usual detective jobs: guarding payrolls, tailing possible suspects, conducting stakeouts, and protecting clients with valuables. He was fired when he lost track of a diamond salesman he was supposed to be protecting. As an actor, William Gargan had played Ellery Queen in three movies, before being cast as Kane. After he left Martin Kane, Gargan landed on his feet. He signed a million dollar, seven year contract with MCA for the radio show Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator on NBC. The final spelling used for his character's first name, Barrie, was the same as that of Gargan's oldest son. Gargan eventually got throat cancer, had a laryngectomy and campaigned vigorously (and rather ironically) against smoking for The American Cancer Society for the last twenty years of his life).

DATE: Mon, 30 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.76 MB
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The Barbara Welles Show - Guest Is Jimmy Stewart (07-21-47)

Guest Is Jimmy Stewart (Aired July 21, 1947) The Barbara Welles Show (an extremely rare program) was a new concept in radio, one that targeted the female listener. Best described in the October 18, 1947 edition of Billboard magazine; "Will you gentlemen please feast your eyes on the facts? Because, frankly, we're not selling the lady's pulchritude. You get that gradis. We're selling her charm for the female radio listener. An women listen to Barbara Welles (Florence Pritchette) on her WOR show, every weekday afternoon at three. They listen - and ACT. They ACT? Within one week, five days, some 6045 women peppered Barbara for a sample of - of all things - paint! And not the kind they gild their faces with. Within two weeks, the number of requests piled up to 10, 297. They came from folks as far off as Maine and Virginia - and even New York. That's mighty pretty mail for a new show, don't you think? Barbara Welles (Florence Pritchette) is such news that LOOK magazine gave her a fancy spread recently. She's something new in radio: a glamour girl with grey matter and a homey touch. You pay only for Barbara Welles when you buy into her WOR show but you get bank-breaking talent as well. Lumininaries like Bing Crosby, June Knight, Lucille Ball and others have been her guests. If you want to move in on what is proving to be one of radio's most productive daytime women's shows, dial PE6 - 8600 NOW.

DATE: Mon, 30 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.46 MB
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The Halls Of Ivy - Student Editorial (01-13-50)

Student Editorial (Aired January 13, 1950) The Halls of Ivy featured Colman as William Todhunter Hall, the president of small, Midwestern Ivy College, and his wife, Victoria, a former British musical comedy star who sometimes felt the tug of her former profession, and followed their interactions with students, friends, and college trustees. Others in the cast included Herbert Butterfield as testy board chairman Clarence Wellman; Willard Waterman (then starring as Harold Peary's successor as The Great Gildersleeve) as board member John Merriweather; and Bea Benadaret, Elizabeth Patterson, and Gloria Gordon as the Halls' maids. Alan Reed (television's Fred Flintstone) appeared periodically as the stuffy English teacher, Professor Heaslip. The series ran 109 half-hour radio episodes from January 6, 1950, to June 25, 1952, with Quinn, Jerome Lawrence and Robert Lee writing many of the scripts and giving free if even more sophisticated play to Quinn's knack for language play, inverted cliches and swift puns (including the show's title and lead characters), a knack he'd shown for years writing Fibber McGee & Molly. Jerome Lawrence and Robert Lee continued as a writing team; their best-known play is Inherit the Wind. Cameron Blake, Walter Brown Newman, Robert Sinclair, and Milton and Barbara Merlin became writers for the program as well. In subject matter, the program was often notably ahead of its time, forward looking, and willing to tackle controversial topics. "Hell Week," first broadcast in 2 January 1952, boldly addressed the unforeseen dangers of college fraternity hazing. "The Leslie Hoff Painting"(27 September 1950) and "The Chinese Student" (7 February 1950) both openly countenanced and dealt with instances of racial bigotry. Another episode centered on an unmarried student's pregnancy. But listeners were surprised to discover that the episode of 24 January 1951, "The Goya Bequest"---a story examining the bequest of a Goya painting that was suspected of being a fraud hyped by its late owner to avoid paying customs duties when bringing to the United States---was written by Ronald Colman himself, who poked fun at his accomplishment while taking a rare turn giving the evening's credits at the show's conclusion. The sponsor was the Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company ("The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous"). Nat Wolff produced and directed, Henry Russell handled the music (and co-wrote the theme with Vick Knight), and radio veteran Ken Carpenter was the announcer. THIS EPISODE: January 13, 1950. "Student Editorial" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Schlitz Beer. Jared Buckley, an Ivy student, has written an editorial in the student newspaper that is most distressful to Mr. Wellman. Benita Hume, Don Quinn (creator, writer), Gloria Gordon, Henry Russell (composer, conductor), Herb Butterfield, Nat Wolff (director), Roland Morris, Ronald Colman, Walter Newman (writer). 29:25.

DATE: Mon, 30 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.56 MB
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Mr. & Mrs. North - Wheel Of Chance (06-09-53)

Wheel Of Chance (Aired June 9, 1953) Mr. and Mrs. North was a radio mystery series that aired on CBS from 1942 to 1954. Alice Frost and Joseph Curtin had the title roles when the series began in 1942. Publisher Jerry North and his wife Pam lived in Greenwich Village at 24 St. Anne's Flat. They were not professional detectives but simply an ordinary couple who stumbled across a murder or two every week for 12 years. The radio program eventually reached nearly 20 million listeners. The characters originated in 1930s vignettes written by Richard Lockridge for the New York Sun, and he brought them back for short stories in The New Yorker. These stories were collected in Mr. and Mrs. North (1936). Lockridge increased the readership after he teamed with his wife Frances on a novel, The Norths Meet Murder (1940), launching a series of 40 novels, including Death takes a Bow, Death on the Aisle and The Dishonest Murderer. Their long-run series continued for over two decades and came to an end in 1963 with the death of Frances Lockridge. Albert Hackett and Peggy Conklin had the title roles in the Broadway production Mr. and Mrs. North, which ran 163 performances at the Belasco Theatre from January 12, 1941, to May 31, 1941. Alfred De Liagre, Jr. produced and directed the play written by Owen Davis. In this version, the North's apartment was located on Greenwich Place, realized in a scenic design by Jo Mielziner. The Owen Davis play became a 1942 MGM movie starring Gracie Allen and William Post, Jr. with Millard Mitchell repeating his role of Detective Mullins from the Broadway production. Others in the cast were Paul Kelly, Rose Hobart and Keye Luke. In 1946, producer-director Fred Coe brought the Owen Davis play to television (on New York City's WNBT) with John McQuade and Maxine Stewart in the leads and Don Haggerty, Joan Marlowe and Millard Mitchell repeating their Broadway roles. Barbara Britton and Richard Denning starred in the TV adaptation seen on CBS from 1952 to 1953 and on NBC in 1954. Guest appearances on this series included Raymond Burr, Hans Conried, Mara Corday, Carolyn Jones, Katy Jurado, Jimmy Lydon, Julia Meade, William Schallert and Gloria Talbott. THIS EPISODE: June 9, 1953. CBS network. "Wheel Of Chance". Sponsored by: Colgate Shaving Cream, Colgate Toothpaste, Halo Shampoo. Just back from a Mexican vacation, Pam and Jerry have unknowingly brought back a roll of microfilm, hidden in a hubcap. Threatened with a gun "that ain't chocolate," the microfilm has been found by a mechanic who's being blackmailed. The system cue is added live. Alice Frost, Joseph Curtin, Maurice Tarplin, Peter Capell, Charles Paul (music), Don Brinkley (writer), Richard Lockridge (creator), Frances Lockridge (creator), John W. Loveton (producer, director), Joe King (announcer). 29:44.

DATE: Sun, 29 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.35 MB
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Ray Bradbury Stories - Night Call Collect (1952)

Night Call Collect (1952) The Stories of Ray Bradbury is, as the title suggests, an anthology containing 100 short stories by American writer Ray Bradbury and was first published by Knopf in 1980. The hundred stories, written from 1943 to 1980, were selected by the author himself. Bradbury's work had previously been collected in various compilations, such as The Martian Chronicles and The October Country, but never in such a large volume (912 pages) or spanning such a long period of time. Some of the more famous stories in this collection include "The Fog Horn", "The Veldt", "The Day It Rained Forever", "The Small Assassin" and "I Sing the Body Electric!". In 2003, Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales was published, containing a further 100 stories from later in his career. Although they sound similar, the two anthologies have entirely different contents and should not be confused. Bradbury was a reader and writer throughout his youth, spending much time in the Carnegie library in Waukegan, Illinois. He used this library as a setting for much of his novel Something Wicked This Way Comes, and depicted Waukegan as "Green Town" in some of his other semi-autobiographical novels—Dandelion Wine, Farewell Summer—as well as in many of his short stories. He attributes his lifelong habit of writing every day to an incident in 1932 when a carnival entertainer, Mr. Electrico, touched him on the nose with an electrified sword, made his hair stand on end, and shouted, "Live forever!" It was from then that Bradbury wanted to live forever and decided on his career as an author in order to do what he was told: live forever. It was at that age that Bradbury first started to do magic. Magic was his first great love. If he had not discovered writing, he would have become a magician.

DATE: Sun, 29 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.59 MB
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The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes - The Blood Soaked Wagon (05-02-49)

The Blood Soaked Wagon (Aired May 2, 1949) The author, (Sir) Arthur Conan-Doyle wrote his first Holmes story, A Study In Scarlet, in 1886. Sherlock Holmes, a fictitious character was based on a real man, Dr Joseph Bell, a renown forensic scientist at Edinburgh University whom Conan-Doyle studied under. Conan-Doyle wrote 56 self contained short stories & 4 novels (60 adventures in total) The collection is known as The Cannon. The first Sherlock Holmes film was produced in 1900. In 1939 the novels were developed as a series of films staring Basil Rathbone, establishing the trademark deerstalker, pipe & spyglass as a global visual icon. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that feature Holmes. The first two stories, short novels appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890, respectively. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialised novels appeared until 1927. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1907, with a final case in 1914. All but four stories are narrated by Holmes's friend and biographer, Dr John H. Watson; two are narrated by Sherlock Holmes himself, and two others are written in the third person. Conan Doyle said that the character of Holmes was inspired by Dr Joseph Bell, for whom Doyle had worked as a clerk at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. Like Sherlock Holmes, Bell was noted for drawing large conclusions from the smallest observations. Michael Harrison has argued in a 1971 article in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine that the character was inspired by Wendell Scherer a "consulting detective" in a murder case that allegedly received a great deal of newspaper attention in England in 1882. At the time of writing, Holmes is about to be re-interpreted all over again by the director Guy Ritchie, with Robert Downey Jnr as Holmes and Jude Law as Watson. Although the film is set in 1891, it is a film adaptation of producer Lionel Wigram (unpublished) Sherlock Holmes comic book. THIS EPISODE: May 2, 1949. Mutual network. "The Adventure Of The Blood-Soaked Wagon". Sponsored by: Clipper Craft Clothes. John Stanley, George Spelvin (a name traditionally used by actors who wish to remain anonymous), Arthur Conan Doyle (creator), Cy Harrice (announcer), Albert Buhrman (music), Basil Loughrane (producer, director), Howard Merrill (writer), Ian Martin. 24:23.

DATE: Sun, 29 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.98 MB
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You Bet Your Life - Secret Word Is Chair (12-21-49)

Secret Word Is Chair (Aired December 7, 1949) You Bet Your Life is an American quiz show that aired on both radio and television. The most well-known version was hosted by Groucho Marx of the Marx Brothers, with announcer and assistant George Fenneman. The show debuted on ABC Radio in October 1947, then moved to CBS Radio in 1949 before making the transition to the NBC Radio and NBC-TV networks in October 1950. Because of its simple format, it was possible to broadcast the show simultaneously on the radio and on television. In 1960, the show was renamed The Groucho Show and ran a further year. Most episodes are in the public domain. The play of the game, however, was secondary to the interplay between Groucho, the contestants, and occasionally Fenneman. The program was rerun into the 1970s, and later in syndication as The Best of Groucho. As such, it was the first game show to have its reruns syndicated. Contestant teams usually consisted of one male and one female, most selected from the studio audience. Occasionally famous or otherwise interesting figures were invited to play (i.e., a Korean-American contestant who was a veteran and had been a prisoner of war during the Korean War). After his signature introduction of "Here he is: the one, the ONLY..." by Fenneman and finished by a thunderous "GROUCHO!" from the audience, Marx would be introduced to the music of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding", his signature song. Some show tension revolved around whether a contestant would say the "secret word", a common word revealed to the audience at the show's outset. If a contestant said the word, a toy duck resembling Groucho with a mustache and eyeglasses, and with a cigar in its bill, descended from the ceiling to bring a $100 bill. A cartoon of a duck with a cigar was also used in opening title sequence. In one episode, Groucho's brother, Harpo, came down instead of the duck, and in another, a model came down in a birdcage with the money. Marx sometimes slyly directed conversation to encourage the secret word to come up. The duck was also occasionally replaced with a wooden Indian figure. THIS EPISODE: December 7, 1949. NBC network. The Secret Word Is Chair. Sponsored by: Elgin-American. The system cue is added live. Groucho Marx, George Fenneman (announcer), Mike Wallace (commercial spokesman, billed as "Myron Wallace"), Jerry Fielding (music), John Guedel (producer), Robert Dwan (director), Bernie Smith (director), Frank Martuccio. 29:45.

DATE: Sat, 28 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.44 MB
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Boston Blackie - The Hooded Gang Protection Racket (06-18-46)

The Hooded Gang Protection Racket (Aired June 18, 1946) The Boston Blackie radio series, also starring Morris, began June 23, 1944, on NBC as a summer replacement for The Amos 'n' Andy Show. Sponsored by Rinso, the series continued until September 15 of that year. Unlike the concurrent films, Blackie had a steady romantic interest in the radio show: Lesley Woods appeared as Blackie's girlfriend Mary Wesley. Harlow Wilcox was the show's announcer. On April 11, 1945, Richard Kollmar took over the title role in a radio series syndicated by Frederic W. Ziv to Mutual and other network outlets. Over 200 episodes of this series were produced between 1944 and October 25, 1950. Other sponsors included Lifebuoy Soap, Champagne Velvet beer, and R&H beer. While investigating mysteries, Blackie invaribly encountered harebrained Police Inspector Farraday (Maurice Tarplin) and always solved the mystery to Farraday's amazement. Initially, friction surfaced in the relationship between Blackie and Farraday, but as the series continued, Farraday recognized Blackie's talents and requested assistance. Blackie dated Mary Wesley (Jan Miner), and for the first half of the series, his best pal Shorty was always on hand. The humorless Farraday was on the receiving end of Blackie's bad puns and word play. Kent Taylor starred in the half-hour TV series, The Adventures of Boston Blackie. Syndicated in 1951, it ran for 58 episodes, continuing in repeats over the following decade. THIS EPISODE: June 18, 1946. "Hooded Gang Protection Racket" - Program #62. ABC network origination, Ziv syndication. Sponsored by: Champagne Velvet Beer (of Indiana). A masked society of extortioners has been formed, which Blackie tries to break up. Richard Kollmar. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Sat, 28 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.39 MB
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Cloak & Dagger - Swastika On The Windmill (07-30-50)

Swastika On The Windmill (Aired July 30, 1950) "Are you willing to undertake a dangerous mission for the United States, knowing in advance you may never return alive?" Cloak and Dagger first aired over the NBC network on May 7, 1950. It had a short run through the Summer on Sundays, changing to Fridays after its Summer run. The last show aired Oct. 22, 1950. This is the story of the WWII special governmental agency, the OSS, or Office of Strategic Services. Its mission was to develop and maintain spy networks throughout Europe and into Asia, while giving aid to underground partisan groups and developing espionage activities for Allied forces overseas.The show is based on the book of the same name by Lt. Col. Corey Ford and Major Alastair MacBain (who were associated with the OSS from its early days.) The dramas are not Hollywood-style, in that they sometimes end with plans foiled or leading characters dead. The theme music was either identical or very similar to that used by Tales of the Texas Rangers. Sherman Marks directed. The cast consisted of The Hungarian Giant, played by Raymond Edward Johnson, and Impy, the Midget, played by Gilbert Mack. THIS EPISODE: July 30, 1950. NBC network. "The Swastika On The Windmill". Sustaining. 4:00 P. M. An O. S. S. operative enters Nazi occupied Holland to stay with his uncle and radio troop information to the Allied forces. Lester Fletcher, Harvey Hayes, Jared Burke, Gordon Stern, Francois Grimar, Basil Langton, Patricia Courtleigh, Beulah Garrick, Victor Chapin, Percy Hoskins (research), Wyllis Cooper (writer, director), Murray Ross (organist while John Gart is on vacation). 29:27.

DATE: Sat, 28 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.80 MB
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Candy Matson - Symphony Of Death (06-20-50)

Symphony Of Death (Aired June 20, 1950) Candy Matson, in its various guises, was one of the ground-breaking lady detective anthologies from The Golden Age of Radio. Locally produced out of the KNBC studios in San Francisco, the series was produced, written and directed by Monty Masters and starred his wife, Natalie Masters, the former Natalie Park. One of only a handful of successful female-led radio noir detective dramas of the era, Candy Matson was the eighth attempt to launch a successful distaff gumshoe series over Radio. After the fine-tuning of the audition--and the green light from NBC--Candy Matson aired as 'Candy Matson, YUkon 2-8209', with expanded characterizations for both Rembrandt and Lt. Mallard and a somewhat 'friskier' Candy herself. The combination clicked. Monty Masters' snappy dialogue, regular references to Bay Area locations, sports teams, cultural attractions and historic landmarks made for a both entertaining and familiar local production. The Jack Webb influence was unmistakeable. Jack Thomas' Rembrandt character smacked of Tudor Owens' various characterizations in Webb productions, 'Lieutenant Mallard' bore more than a passing remblance to Webb's more sympathetic Police associates over the years (Raymond Burr excepted), and the dialogue throughout the production was highly reminiscent of most of Jack Webb's efforts prior to Dragnet. But regardless of the influence, Monty Masters' scripts and dialogue remained entirely distinct--as a detective genre--from anything that had previously aired over network Radio. The Masters' leaned heavily on their prior associations in the Bay Area, employing many of the actors that had appeared with Natalie Park and Monty Masters in Hawthorne House (1935) and their short-lived Mad Masters (1947). Indeed the series enjoyed something of an ensemble or repertory quality over the entire run. Recurring performers in various roles over the years were John Grover, Helen Kleeb, Hal Burdick, Lu Tobin and Mary Milford, among others. Dudley Manlove was the enthusiastic, fey announcer for the duration of the production series and Eloise Rowan provided the traditional organ underscore for the series. The Masters', generous to a fault with their players, allowed both Jack Thomas and Henry Leff to fully develop their characters in the course of the production. Henry Leff performed double-duty in the world of Drama, both portraying Lieutenant Mallard in Candy Matson, as well as heading the Broadcasting Department at City College of San Francisco for over thirty-five years. "Show Notes From Digital Deli (http://www.digitaldeliftp.com) THIS EPISODE: June 20, 1950. NBC network, San Francisco origination. "Symphony Of Death". Sustaining. YUkon 2-8309. A composer is going to die, and there's no doubt about it. Natalie Masters, Monte Masters (producer, director). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Sat, 28 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.37 MB
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The Adventures Of Frank Race - Fairway Beauties (11-13-49)

Fairway Beauties (Aired November 13, 1949) The Series was heard over all four networks over the following four years in initial syndication and rebroadcast. Given one's geographical location, a listener might well have been able to hear as many as three or four weekly airings of The Adventures of Frank Race. Seasoned writer Joel Murcott joined Broadcasters Program Syndicate for the express purpose of writing and supervising Bruce Eells' first two dramatic offerings, Frontier Town, starring Jeff Chandler under the tongue in cheek performing name 'Tex Chandler' and The Adventures of Frank Race initially starring durable and versatile character actor Tom Collins. Legendary composer Ivan Ditmars scored both the audition and production series. The audition for the series was recorded during February 1949. The audition featured Tom Collins as former attorney and O.S.S. officer, Frank Race. Race is aided by his associate, former cab driver, Marcus 'Marc' Donovan portrayed by Tony Barrett. Lurene Tuttle is also featured in the audition. The audition lays out the premise for the contemplated series. Frank Race has returned to civilian life after a wartime stint as an operative for the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) the progenitor of the Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.). Somewhat disenchanted with the prospect of returning to practice Law, Race forms his own investigations firm, specializing in industrial, State, and international crimes of fraud and espionage. THIS EPISODE: November 13, 1949. Program #29. Broadcasters Program Syndicate syndication. "The Adventure Of The Fairway Beauties". Commercials added locally. Two luscious golfing babes and a murder keep Frank up to par. Paul Dubov, Tony Barrett, Buckley Angel (writer, director), Joel Murcott (writer, director), Bruce Eells (producer), Ivan Ditmars (organist), Art Gilmore (announcer), Frank Lovejoy, Lillian Buyeff, Tom Holland, Michael Ann Barrett, William Johnstone. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Fri, 27 Aug 2010
SIZE: 8.93 MB
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Mutual (Sears) Radio Theater - The Trenches (05-22-80)

The Trenches (Aired May 22, 1980) Mutual Radio Theater ( Sears Radio Theater ) was an anthology series of radio drama which ran week nightly on CBS Radio in 1979, sponsored by the department-store chain; in its second year, 1980, it moved to the Mutual Broadcasting System and became the Mutual Radio Theater; the MBS series was repeats from the CBS run, until September of 1980, when a short season of new dramas was presented. The Mutual run was still most often sponsored by Sears. Often paired with The CBS Radio Mystery Theater on those stations which cleared it in its first season, the SRT offered a different genre of drama for each day's broadcast. Monday was "Western Night" and was hosted by Lorne Greene. Tuesday was "Comedy Night", hosted by Andy Griffith. Wednesday was "Mystery Night" with Vincent Price as host. Thursday was "Love And Hate Night" with Cicely Tyson doing honors as host. Finally, Friday brought "Adventure Night", first hosted by Richard Widmark and later by Howard Duff and then by Leonard Nimoy. Though less long-lived than NPR's Earplay or the Mystery Theater, it was an ambitious if not particularly critically-favored attempt to reinvigorate a neglected field. Actors heard on the series included Parley Baer, Mary Jane Croft, Howard Culver, John Dehner, Virginia Gregg, Janet Waldo, Vic Perrin, Hans Conried, Marvin Miller, Elliot Lewis, Jeff Corey, Lesley Woods, Robert Rockwell, Lurene Tuttle, Eve Arden, Keith Andes, Harriet Nelson, Alan Young, Tom Bosley, Marion Ross, Lloyd Bochner, Rick Jason, Frank Campanella, Toni Tennille, Arthur Hill, Dan O'Herlihy, Jesse White and Frank Nelson.

DATE: Fri, 27 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.68 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Hopalong Cassidy" - Murder On The Trail (02-12-50)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Hopalong Cassidy" - Murder On The Trail (Aired February 12, 1950) As portrayed on the screen, the white-haired Bill "Hopalong" Cassidy was usually clad strikingly in black (including his hat, an exception to the longstanding western film stereotype that only villains wore black hats). He was reserved and well spoken, with a fine sense of fair play. He was often called upon to intercede when dishonest characters were taking advantage of honest citizens. "Hoppy" and his white horse, Topper, usually traveled through the west with two companions — one young and trouble-prone with a weakness for damsels in distress, the other comically awkward and outspoken. The juvenile lead was successively played by James Ellison, Russell Hayden, George Reeves, and Rand Brooks. George Hayes originally played Cassidy's grizzled sidekick, Windy Halliday. After Hayes left the series due to a salary dispute with producer Harry Sherman, he was replaced by comedian Britt Wood as Speedy McGinnis, and finally by veteran movie comedian Andy Clyde as California Carlson. Clyde, the most durable of the sidekicks, remained with the series until it ended. A few actors of future prominence appeared in Cassidy films, most notably Robert Mitchum, who appeared in seven of the films at the beginning of his career. The sixty-six Hopalong Cassidy pictures were filmed not by movie studios, but by independent producers who released the films through the studios. Most of the "Hoppies", as the films were known, were distributed by Paramount Pictures to highly favorable returns, and were noted for their fast action and excellent outdoor photography (usually by Russell Harlan). Harry Sherman was anxious to make more ambitious movies and tried to cancel the Cassidy series, but popular demand forced Sherman to go back into production, this time for United Artists release. Sherman gave up the series once and for all in 1944, but star William Boyd wanted to keep it going. To do this, he gambled his entire future on Hopalong Cassidy, mortgaging virtually everything he owned to buy both the character rights from Mulford and the backlog of movies from Sherman. In the first film Hopalong Cassidy (then spelled "Hop-along") got his name after being shot in the leg.

DATE: Fri, 27 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.62 MB
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Dark Fantasy - Superstition Be Hanged (03-13-42)

Superstition Be Hanged (Aired March 13, 1942) Dark Fantasy was a short series with tales of the weird, adventures of the supernatural, created for you by Scott Bishop. The series aired as a horror drama on NBC between 1941 and 1942. Dark Fantasy was a series dedicated to dealings with the unknown. Originating from radio station WKY, Oklahoma City, it was written by Scott Bishop (of Mysterious Traveler and The Sealed Book fame) and was heard Fridays over stations. Tom Paxton served as announcer. The shows covered horror, science fiction and murder mysteries. Although a short series, the shows are excellent with some stories way ahead of their time. The following is a news promo promoting the show: "Every since Lights Out went out several years ago, fans of the fiendish have been clamoring for more good old goose-pimple horror drama on the air. Now they have it. One of the programs that currently freezes the airwaves with its chilling stories is Dark Fantasy comparatively new to the networks. In the late hours of Friday nights these shivery, shocking stories go out over NBC - right straight from Oklahoma City, which you might not have thought of as headquarters for haunts. Station WKY is the home of the Dark Fantasy plays, and the writer is Scott Bishop, who lives in the midst of mystery and the supernatural, represented by the innumerable volumes of thriller fiction, fantasy lore and all kinds of horror literature that fill his home andhis office. Bishop has long contributed to network broadcasting and to magazines. He says, 'Give the listener enough material to let his imagination go to work, and he'll supply his own goose-pimples.' Dark Fantasy has been furnishing plenty of such material since last November. And judging from enthusiastic comment, the horror fans are responding with goose-pimples galore! Tune in every Friday on Station WKY Oklahoma City." Show Notes From The OTRR Group THIS EPISODE: March 13, 1942. Program #17. NBC network, WKY, Oklahoma City origination. "Superstition Be Hanged". Sustaining. A trapeze artist named Flyer Samson is killed when he falls during his act. A fortune teller predicted death for anyone who fails to wear the white feather, spotted with the blood of a dove. Garland Moss, Murillo Scofield, Scott Bishop (writer), Tom Paxton (announcer), Eleanor Naylor Corin, Ben Morris, Irmay Ray. 24:24.

DATE: Thu, 26 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.73 MB
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Gangbusters - The Case of the Elusive Leader (10-22-49)

The Case of the Elusive Leader (Aired October 22, 1949) Gang Busters was an American dramatic radio program heralded as "the only national program that brings you authentic police case histories." It premiered as G-Men, sponsored by Chevrolet, on July 20, 1935. After the title was changed to Gang Busters January 15, 1936, the show had a 21-year run through November 20, 1957. Beginning with a barrage of loud sound effects — guns firing and tires squealing — this intrusive introduction led to the popular catch phrase "came on like Gang Busters."The series dramatized FBI cases, which producer-director Phillips H. Lord arranged in close association with Bureau director J. Edgar Hoover. Hoover insisted that only closed cases would be used. The initial series was on NBC Radio from July 20 - October 12, 1935. It then aired on CBS from January 15, 1936 to June 15, 1940, sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive and Cue magazine. From October 11, 1940 to December 25, 1948, it was heard on the Blue Network, with various sponsors that included Sloan's Liniment, Waterman pens and Tide. Returning to CBS on January 8, 1949, it ran until June 25, 1955, sponsored by Grape-Nuts and Wrigley's chewing gum. The final series was on the Mutual Broadcasting System from October 5, 1955 to November 27, 1957. It was once narrated by Norman Schwarzkopf, Sr., former head of the New Jersey State Police. The radio series was adapted for DC Comics, Big Little Books and a 1942 movie serial. The 1952 Gang Busters TV series was reedited into two feature films, Gang Busters (1954) and Guns Don't Argue (1957). THIS EPISODE: October 22, 1949. Program #603. CBS network origination, syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Case Of The Elusive Leader". Sponsored by: Stereo Exchange. The Hooker gang is finally caught, but Lopez Hooker soon escapes and has to be caught all over again. WRVR rebroadcast date: January 29, 1973. Roger Foster (announcer), Phillips H. Lord (producer). 30:23.

DATE: Thu, 26 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.94 MB
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Inspector Thorne - The Two Fiancees Murder Case (09-13-51)

The Two Fiancees Murder Case (Aired September 13, 1951) By the 1940's, Frank and Ann Hummert controlled four and a half hours of national weekday broadcast schedules. Their features reportedly spawned more that 5 million pieces of correspondence annually from steadfast fans. Simultaneously they brought in more than half of the national radio chain's advertising revenues generated during the daylight hours. The couple broadcast 18 quarter-hour serials five times weekly, a total of 90 original episodes for 52 weeks per year, with none of those ever repeated. Some shows were "Amanda of Honeymoon Hill", "Backstage Wife","Chaplin Jim USA", "David Harum", "Easy Aces", "Front Page Farrell", "John's Other Wife", "Just Plain Bill", "The Life of Mary Sothern","Lora Lawton", "Lorenzo Jones", "Ma Perkins", "Mrs Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch", "Our Gal Sunday", "The Romance of Helen Trent" and "Young Widder Brown". THIS EPISODE: September 13, 1951. NBC network. "The Two Fiancees Murder Case". Sustaining. Edward Slattery (director), Frank Hummert (creator), Anne Hummert (creator), Fred Collins (announcer), Staats Cotsworth, Geraldine Merkin (writer). 29:48.

DATE: Thu, 26 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.44 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Lone Ranger" - Timberland (08-13-48)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Lone Ranger" - Timberland (Aired August 13, 1948) On radio, the Lone Ranger was played by several actors, including John L. Barrett who played the role on the test broadcasts on WEBR during early January, 1933; George Seaton (under the name George Stenius) from January 31 to May 9 of 1933; series director James Jewell and an actor known only by the pseudonym "Jack Deeds" (for one episode each), and then by Earle Graser from May 16, 1933, until April 7, 1941. On April 8, Graser died in a car accident, and for five episodes, as the result of being critically wounded, the Lone Ranger was unable to speak beyond a whisper, with Tonto carrying the action. Finally, on the broadcast of April 18, 1941, deep-voiced performer Brace Beemer, who had been the show's announcer for several years, took over the role and played the part until the end. Fred Foy, also an announcer on the show, took over the role on one broadcast on March 29, 1954, when Brace Beemer had a brief case of laryngitis. Tonto was played throughout the run by actor John Todd (although there were a few isolated occasions when he was replaced by Roland Parker, better known as Kato for much of the run of sister series The Green Hornet), and other supporting players were selected from Detroit area actors and studio staff. These included Jay Michael (who also played the lead on Challenge of the Yukon aka Sgt. Preston of the Yukon), Bill Saunders (as various villains, including Butch Cavendish), Paul Hughes (as the Ranger's friend Thunder Martin and as various army colonels and badmen), future movie star John Hodiak, Janka Fasciszewska (under the name Jane Fae), and others. The part of nephew Dan Reid was played by various child actors, including Bob Martin, James Lipton, and Dick Beals. The last new radio episode of the Lone Ranger was aired on September 3, 1954. Transcribed repeats (of 1952–53 episodes) continued on ABC until June 24, 1955, and then selected repeats appeared on NBC's late-afternoon weekday schedule [5:30–5:55pm Eastern] from September 1955 through May 25, 1956. THIS EPISODE: August 13, 1948. Program #2429/1654. Syndicated. "Jack Bonner"/"Timberland". Music fill for local commercial insert. The owner of a stand of timber is about to lose his land when his mortgage is to be foreclosed in a month. The Ranger, however, has an idea. The date, program numbers and story title are subject to correction. Brace Beemer, John Todd, George W. Trendle (writer, creator, producer), Charles D. Livingstone (director), Fran Striker (editor), Dan Beattie (writer). 29:32.

DATE: Thu, 26 Aug 2010
SIZE: 4.65 MB
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The FBI In Peace & War - The Good Boy (11-17-54)

The Good Boy (Aired November 17, 1954) The FBI in Peace and War was a radio crime drama inspired by Frederick Lewis Collins' book, The FBI in Peace and War. The idea for the show came from Louis Pelletier who wrote many of the scripts. Among the show's other writers were Jack Finke, Ed Adamson and Collins. It aired on CBS from November 25, 1944 to September 28, 1958, it had a variety of sponsors (including Lava Soap, Wildroot Cream-Oil, Lucky Strike, Nescafe and Wrigley's) over the years. In 1955 it was the eighth most popular show on radio, as noted in Time: The Nielsen ratings of the top ten radio shows seemed to indicate that not much has changed in radio: 1) Jack Benny Show (CBA), 2) Amos 'n' Andy (CBS), 3) People Are Funny (NBC), 4) Our Miss Brooks (CBS) 5) Lux Radio Theater (NBC), 6) My Little Margie (CBS), 7) Dragnet (NBC), 8) FBI in Peace and War (CBS), 9) Bergen and McCarthy (CBS), 10) Groucho Marx (NBC). Martin Blaine and Donald Briggs headed the cast. The theme was the March from Prokofiev's The Love for Three Oranges. THIS EPISODE: November 17, 1954. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Good Boy". The nicest kid in town turns out to be a professional punk. Frederick L. Collins (creator). 25 minutes.

DATE: Wed, 25 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.85 MB
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Case Dismissed - Pitfalls Of Buying A Home (02-13-54)

Pitfalls Of Buying A Home (Aired February 13, 1954) Case Dismissed was developed as a public service to frame "the story of your legal rights." It was produced in cooperation with The Chicago Bar Association and employed John Fitzgerald, Dean of Loyola University Law School as both host and advisor to the series. A local production of WMAQ AM/FM, NBC's network affiliate in Chicago, the series ran for thirteen weeks during the Spring of 1954. The production employed local talent for the most part. Carlton KaDell, who started his Radio career in Chicago, starred in most of the productions. The remainder of the casts were comprised of WMAQ employees, local Chicago artists, and WMAQ's own production staff. While it's tempting to label this series a Public Service Announcement, it was far more than that. Most of the scripts very cleverly portrayed every right way--or wrong way--to approach a range of legal matters that might concievably affect any American. After resolving the script one way or the other, the Host, John Fitzgerald, would dissect the legal issues involved in the script, point listeners to the right source of legal information--for the State of Illinois, in any case--and suggest alternate scenarios, as time permitted, to further illustrate the larger issues behind that week's topic. As a local presentation, WMAQ's production of Case Dismissed acquitted itself very well indeed. With few exceptions, the enacted legal issues were realistically depicted, thoroughly explored, and informatively resolved. The exposition for and resolution of these programs was never preachy, overly complicated, nor left unresolved. Each story had an arc that was resolved for that particular combination of legal issues and choices. The listener was never left hanging. Mindful of the fact that Case Dismissed was being heard in many other states besides Illinois, the program regularly reminded its listeners that the problems presented and legal remedies offered were based only on then current Illinois Law. But it's also clear that because they were mindful of a larger audience, the producers and writers very helpfully selected a broad range of legal topics that were general enough in nature to present useful choices and information to residents in virtually any state that might be listening in. All told, a fascinating, useful, and well mounted series of legal dramas that accomplished precisely what they set out to do for thirteen weeks. So effectively, in fact that the basic legal tenets put forth within most of these thirteen episodes remain almost universally applicable today. Show Notes From The "Digital Deli". THIS EPISODE: February 13, 1954. "Pitfalls Of Buying A Home" - NBC network, WMAQ, Chicago origination. Sustaining. The program is produced in co-operation with the Chicago Bar Association. A drama about the dangers in buying a home. Sidney Breeze, Betty Ross (producer), Herbert Littow (director), Tom Evans (sound), Harold Witteberry (engineer), Arthur Peterson, Jack Lester, Stanley Gordon, John C. Fitzgerald (host, Dean of the Law School, Loyola University), Robert Carmen ( writer), Meg Hahn, Lee Bennett (announcer). 28:17.

DATE: Wed, 25 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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Calling All Cars - Little Phil Alquin (05-09-34)

Little Phil Alquin (Aired May 9, 1934) Calling All Cars was one of the earliest police shows on the air. It ran from Nov. 29, 1933-Sept. 8, 1939. It’s sponsor was the Rio Grande Oil Company, which is why the show only ran in areas where Rio Grande "cracked" gasoline was sold. The sponsor promoted its "close ties" with police departments in Arizona and Southern California, urging listeners to buy its product for "police car performance" in their own cars. As shows of this nature do it dealt with tracking killers and robbers with a recap of the justice which was enforced. The writer and director was William N. Robson. Calling All Cars episodes were dramatized true crime stories that were not only introduced by officers of the Los Angeles Police Department but were true life crime stories of the LAPD. If you are thinking early version of Dragnet, yes, but not quite as polished. Dragnet was believed to have been inspired by Calling All Cars. None of the actors on the show ever received on-air credit, but among the talent OTR fans can hear the likes of Elvia Allman, Jackson Beck, Charles Bickford, John Gibson, Richard LeGrand and Hanley Stafford, just to name a few. The police dispatcher, Sergeant Jesse Rosenquist of the Los Angeles Police Department was the only continuing character and was used for the entire run of the show. THIS EPISODE: May 9, 1934. Program #24. CBS Pacific network (Don Lee net). "Little Phil Alquin". Sponsored by: Rio Grande Oil. A police lieutenant has just been murdered by an unknown assailant. Frederick Lindsley is introduced as "Professor Lindsley." The system cue has been deleted. Charles Frederick Lindsley (narrator). 29:08.

DATE: Wed, 25 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Gunsmoke" - Cyclone (03-14-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Gunsmoke" - Cyclone (Aired March 14, 1953) Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. The stories take place in and around Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West. The radio version ran from 1952 to 1961, and John Dunning writes that among radio drama enthusiasts "Gunsmoke is routinely placed among the best shows of any kind and any time." The television version ran for 20 seasons from 1955 to 1975, and still remains the United States' longest-running prime time, live-action drama with 635 episodes ("Law and Order" ended in 2010 with 476 episodes). The half-hour animated comedy "The Simpsons", is slated for a 21st season in Fall 2010. In the late 1940s, CBS chairman William S. Paley, a fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe radio serial, asked his programming chief, Hubell Robinson, to develop a hardboiled Western series, a show about a "Philip Marlowe of the Old West." Robinson instructed his West Coast CBS Vice-President, Harry Ackerman, who had developed the Philip Marlowe series, to take on the task. Ackerman and his scriptwriters, Mort Fine and David Friedkin, created an audition script called "Mark Dillon Goes to Gouge Eye". Two auditions were created in 1949. The first was very much like a hardboiled detective series and starred Rye Billsbury as Dillon; the second starred Straight Arrow actor Howard Culver in a more Western, lighter version of the same script. CBS liked the Culver version better, and Ackerman was told to proceed. But there was a complication. Culver's contract as the star of Straight Arrow would not allow him to do another Western series. The project was shelved for three years, when MacDonnell and Meston discovered it creating an adult Western series of their own. MacDonnell and Meston wanted to create a radio Western for adults, in contrast to the prevailing juvenile fare such as The Lone Ranger and The Cisco Kid. Gunsmoke was set in Dodge City, Kansas during the thriving cattle days of the 1870s. Dunning notes, "The show drew critical acclaim for unprecedented realism." THIS EPISODE: March 14, 1953. CBS network. "Cyclone". Sustaining. The program includes a message of praise for the show from the Governor of Kansas. The Cyclone Ranch has been sold under strange circumstances. Marshal Dillon suspects foul play. George Walsh (announcer), Georgia Ellis, Harry Bartell, Howard McNear, Jerry Hausner, Joe Cranston, Lawrence Dobkin, Les Crutchfield (writer), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), Parley Baer, Vivi Janis, William Conrad. 30:00.

DATE: Wed, 25 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.58 MB
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The Life Of Riley - Lay Offs (09-08-45)

Lay Offs (Aired September 8, 1945) The first Life of Riley radio show was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941 to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later. The radio program starring William Bendix aired on the ABC Blue Network from January 16, 1944 to June 8, 1945. Then it moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945 to June 29, 1951. The supporting cast featured John Brown, who portrayed not only undertaker Digger O'Dell but also Riley's co-worker Gillis. Whereas Gillis gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but, thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The series was co-developed by the non-performing Marx Brother, Gummo. Procter and Gamble (Prell shampoo) and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer were the show's longtime sponsors. THIS EPISODE: September 8, 1945. "Lay-Offs" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Teel. Riley thinks he's getting two weeks pay for his ten years of service but circumstances finds him layed-off instead. This is possibly the first show of the series sponsored by Teel. William Bendix, John Brown, Ken Carpenter (announcer), Paula Winslowe, Scotty Beckett, Lou Coslowe (music), Dink Trout, Sharon Douglas, Don Bernard (director). 29:22.

DATE: Tue, 24 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.24 MB
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I Was A Communist For The FBI - Little Boy Red (10-22-52)

Little Boy Red (Aired October 22, 1952) Throughout most of the 1940's, Matt Cvetic worked as a volunteer undercover agent for the FBI, infiltrating the Communist Party in Pittsburgh. In 1949, his testimony helped to convict several top Party members of conspiracy to overthrow the U.S. government. Cvetic sold his account to "The Saturday Evening Post" and it was serialized under the title "I Posed as a Communist for the FBI". It later became a best-selling book. In 1951, Warner Brothers released a film based on these accounts entitled "I Was A Communist For The FBI", starring with Frank Lovejoy as Cvetic. In 1952, in the midst of the Red scare of the 1950's, the Frederick W. Ziv Company produced the syndicated radio series with the same title as the movie. It was produced without assistance from the FBI, which refused to cooperate. I Was a Communist for the FBI consisted of 78 episodes syndicated by the Frederick W. Ziv Company to more than 600 stations, including KNX in Los Angeles, California, with original episodes running from April 23, 1952 to October 14, 1953. Each episode ended with Dana Andrew's well-remembered words, ""I was a Communist for the FBI. I walk alone". The show had a budget of $12,000 a week, a very high cost to produce a radio show at the time. THIS EPISODE: October 22, 1952. Program #27. ZIV Syndication. "Little Boy Red". Commercials added locally. A Russian is being forced to return home because his very Communist son has been kidnapped and brought to a camp in the country. The date is sub ject to correction. Byron Kane, Dana Andrews, Jeffrey Silver, Truman Bradley (announcer). 27:25.

DATE: Tue, 24 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.67 MB
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The Milton Berle Show - A Salute To Politics (03-16-48)

A Salute To Politics (Aired March 16, 1948) Berle entered show business at the age of five when he won an amateur talent contest. He appeared as a child actor in silent films, beginning with The Perils of Pauline, filmed in Fort Lee, New Jersey. The director told Berle that he would portray a little boy who would be thrown from a moving train. In Milton Berle: An Autobiography, he explained, "I was scared shitless, even when he went on to tell me that Pauline would save my life. Which is exactly what happened, except that at the crucial moment they threw a bundle of rags instead of me from the train. I bet there are a lot of comedians around today who are sorry about that." By Berle's account, he continued to play child roles in other films: Bunny's Little Brother, Tess of the Storm Country, Birthright, Love's Penalty, Divorce Coupons and Ruth of the Range. Berle recalled, "There were even trips out to Hollywood—the studios paid—where I got parts in Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, with Mary Pickford; The Mark of Zorro, with Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., and Tillie's Punctured Romance, with Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand and Marie Dressler." However, Berle's claims to have appeared in many of these films, particularly the 1914 Chaplin Keystone comedy Tillie's Punctured Romance, are hotly disputed by some, who cite the lack of supporting evidence that Berle even visited the West Coast until much later. The newsboy role often claimed by Berle in Tillie was unquestionably played by resident Keystone child actor Gordon Griffith. THIS EPISODE: March 16, 1948. NBC network. Sponsored by: Philip Morris. "A Salute To Politics". President Berle in the White House. Frank Gallop (announcer), Milton Berle, Ray Bloch and His Orchestra. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Tue, 24 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.52 MB
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The Mayor Of The Town - A Fraudulent Artist (03-24-43)

A Fraudulent Artist (Aired March 24, 1943) An NBC offering. Aired on Sundays from 7:00PM to 7:30PM, starring Lional Barrymore and Agnes Moorehead. The creator and writer was Jean Holloway, the announcer Harlow Wilcox, music by Gordon Jenkins and sponsored by Rinso detergent. The show was a perfect vehicle for Lionel Barrymore: rich with warmhearted humor, and good-natured grumbling, its "mayor" had a fierce bark but a mushy heart when confronted with the plight of an orphan or a stray dog. The mayor cared little about political advantage: he even found time, once a year, to turn the town of Springdale into a special theater, to give his traditional performance as Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol. THE CAST: Lionel Barrymore as the mayor of the town of Springdale. Agnes Moorehead as Marilly, his housekeeper. Conrad Binyon as the mayor's ward, Butch. Gloria McMillan as Sharlee Bronson, Butch's best girl. Priscilla Lyon as Holly-Ann, the mayor's granddaughter. Also: Will Wright, Sharon Douglas, Irvin Lee, Marjorie Davies, and other Hollywood actors. Producer: Murray Bolen; later Knowles Entrikin. Director: Jack Van Nostrand. Writers: Jean Holloway, Leonard St. Clair, Howard Blake, Erna Lazarus, etc.; Howard Breslin and Charles Tazewell wrote alternate weeks, ca. 1945. Orchestra:. Gordon Jenkins (ca. 1943); Bernard Katz (1945); Frank Worth. Sound Effects: David Light, Mary Ann Gideon. THIS EPISODE: March 24, 1943. "A Fraudulent Artist" - CBS network. Sponsored by: Rinso. A phoney artist seems to be very interested in a group of cups sent to Sharon from overseas. The final commercial and system cue have been deleted. Lionel Barrymore, Agnes Moorehead, Carl Esmond, Arthur Q. Bryan, Gerald Mohr, Will Wright, Harlow Wilcox (announcer), Jean Holloway (writer). 29:34.

DATE: Tue, 24 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.35 MB
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Starlight Mystery Theater (Matt Slade) - A Case Of Murder (1964)

A Case Of Murder (1964) *The Exact Date Is Unknown Mathew Slade: Private Investigator was a featured, half-hour mystery presentation by The Pacifica Players of Pacifica Radio of Berkeley, California and the Pacifica Foundation of North Hollywood, California. It premiered as a Starlight Mystery Theater production on July 5, 1964 over Pacifica Radio affiliate stations. Initially announced for alternating Sundays, the program soon began airing in erratic installments from August through November of 1964. Starring William Wintersole as Mathew Slade, the program was billed as a radio mystery revival series from the outset, presented in recognition of the hundreds of popular detective mysteries that had aired throughout The Golden Age of Radio. At least twelve of the Mathew Slade: Private Investigator installments from Starlight Mystery Theater were selected by The Armed Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) for transcription and rebroadcast to both the Armed Forces Network (AFN) in Europe in 1966 and The Far East Network (FEN) in 1968. Mathew Slade, or 'Mat' Slade, was a private investigator in the Philip Marlowe, Richard Diamond, Sam Spade, and Michael Shayne tradition--hard-boiled, hard-drinking, hard-loving, Radio Noir. The inaugural presentation, Day of The Phoenix, was announced as a three-part arc, to be aired on alternating Sundays for the first six weeks of the run. Day of The Phoenix was clearly an homage to Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon--in this instance it's a statuette of a Jade Phoenix that's missing. Times have changed, however, and Mathew Slade isn't a '$50.00 a day man'. 1964's Mat Slade asks $200.00 per day -- plus expenses. THIS EPISODE: AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Case Of Murder". One of Slade's old clients has been killed "accidentally", yet his wife asks Slade to help get rid of the body!"

DATE: Mon, 23 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.65 MB
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X Minus - The Vital Factor (11-30-55)

The Vital Factor (Aired November 30, 1955) Episodes of the show include adaptations of Robert Sheckley's "Skulking Permit," Bradbury's "Mars Is Heaven," Heinlein's "Universe" and "The Green Hills of Earth", " Pohl’s "The Tunnel under the World," J. T. McIntosh’s "Hallucination Orbit," Fritz Leiber’s "A Pail of Air" and George Lefferts' "The Parade". The program opened with announcer Fred Collins delivering the countdown, leading into this introduction (although later shows were partnered with Galaxy Science Fiction rather than Astounding Science Fiction): Countdown for blastoff... X minus five, four, three, two, X minus one... Fire! [Rocket launch SFX] From the far horizons of the unknown come transcribed tales of new dimensions in time and space. These are stories of the future; adventures in which you'll live in a million could-be years on a thousand may-be worlds. The National Broadcasting Company in cooperation with Street and Smith, publishers of Astounding Science Fiction presents... X Minus One. The series was cancelled after the 126th broadcast on January 9, 1958. However, the early 1970s brought a wave of nostalgia for old-time radio; a new experimental episode, "The Iron Chancellor" by Robert Silverberg, was created in 1973, but it failed to revive the series. NBC also tried broadcasting the old recordings, but their irregular once-monthly scheduling kept even devoted listeners from following the broadcasts. All episodes of the show survive. Future Tense! was a 1974-76 radio series, produced in Kalamazoo, Michigan, with local actors performing scripts updated from X Minus One by Professor Eli Segal. [1] The show was a production of WMUK, the college radio station of Western Michigan University. Segal also produced X Minus One recreations on his Audion Theatre (1990). THIS EPISODE: November 30, 1955. NBC network. "The Vital Factor". Sustaining. A ruthless millionaire is determined to be the first man to conquer space...no matter what the cost. The script was previously used on "Dimension X" on August 16, 1951. Nelson Bond (writer), Joe DeSantis, Guy Sorel, William Welch (producer), Daniel Sutter (director), Fred Collins (announcer), Grant Richards, John McGovern, Luis Van Rooten, Richard Hamilton, Florence Williams, Howard Rodman (adaptor). 25:44.

DATE: Mon, 23 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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Pete Kelly's Blues - Little Jake (07-25-51)

Little Jake (Aired July 25, 1951) Pete Kelly's Blues was an American radio drama which aired over NBC as an unsponsored summer replacement series on Wednesday nights at 8pm(et) from July 4 through September 19, 1951. The series starred Jack Webb as Pete Kelly and was created by writer Richard L. Breen, who had previously worked with Webb on Pat Novak for Hire; James Moser and Jo Eisinger wrote most of the other scripts. Set in Kansas City in the 1920s, the series was a crime drama with a strong musical atmosphere (Webb was a noted Dixieland jazz enthusiast). Pete Kelly was a musician, a cornet player who headed his own jazz combo, "Pete Kelly's Big Seven." They worked at 417 Cherry Street, a speakeasy run by George Lupo, often mentioned but never heard. Kelly, narrating the series, described Lupo as a "fat, friendly little guy." The plots typically centered around Kelly's reluctant involvement with gangsters, gun molls, FBI agents, and people trying to save their own skins. The endings were often downbeat. The series inspired a 1955 film version of Pete Kelly's Blues, in which Jack Webb produced, directed and starred. It used many of the same musicians, including Cathcart, and Ella Fitzgerald was cast as Maggie Jackson. A lesser-known television version, still produced and directed by Webb but with William Reynolds in the lead, aired in 1959, using scripts originally written for the radio version. THIS EPISODE: July 25, 1951. NBC network. Sustaining. This recording might be an AFRS rebroadcast. "Kansas City is no place to get off a train, unless you're a sack of mail!" An altar boy named "Little Jake" has been shot in a church. What's in the sealed envelope that's been forced onto Pete? Radio doesn't get much better than this! Jack Webb, George Fenneman (nnouncer), Dick Cathcart (cornet), James Moser (writer), William Conrad, Matty Matlock (scoring, clarinet), Nick Fatool (drums), Ray Sherman (piano), George Van Eps (guitar), Jud DeMott (? bass), Moe Schneider (trombone). 28:48.

DATE: Sun, 22 Aug 2010
SIZE: 7.14 MB
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The Adventures Of Ozzie & Harriet - Sales Resistance (10-05-51)

Sales Resistance (Aired October 5, 1951) The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet is an American sitcom, airing on ABC from October 3, 1952 to September 3, 1966, starring the real life Nelson family. After a long run on radio, the show was brought to television where it continued its success, running on both radio and TV for a couple of years. The series starred Ozzie Nelson and his wife, singer Harriet Nelson (née Hilliard), and their young sons, David Nelson and Eric Nelson, better known as Ricky. Don DeFore had a recurring role as the Nelsons' friendly neighbor "Thorny". The series attracted large audiences, and although it was never a top-ten hit, it became synonymous with the 1950s ideal American family life. It is the longest-running "live-action"/non-animated sitcom in US TV history. In the early 1930s, a booking at the Glen Island Casino landed Ozzie Nelson's orchestra national network radio exposure. After three years together with the orchestra, Ozzie and Harriet signed to appear regularly on The Baker's Broadcast (1933-1938), hosted first by Joe Penner, then by Robert L. Ripley, and finally by cartoonist Feg Murray. The couple married on October 8, 1935 during this series run, and realized working together in radio would keep them together more than continuing their musical careers separately. In 1941, the Nelsons joined the cast of The Red Skelton Show, also providing much of the show's music. The couple stayed with the series for three years. They also built their radio experience by guest appearances, together and individually, on many top radio shows, from comedies such as The Fred Allen Show, to the mystery titan Suspense, in a 1947 episode called "Too Little to Live On". THIS EPISODE: October 5, 1951. ABC network. Sponsored by: Heinz Foods. Ozzie shows an amazing lack of Sales Resistance and comes up smelling like a rose, literally. Ozzie Nelson, Harriet Hilliard, Verna Felton, Sheldon Leonard, H. J. Heinz, Verne Smith (announcer), David Nelson, Ricky Nelson, John Brown, Lurene Tuttle, Billy May (composer, conductor). 29:36.

DATE: Sun, 22 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.68 MB
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Philip Morris Playhouse - The Iron Man (07-29-49)

The Iron Man (Aired July 29, 1949) Philip Morris invested heavily in radio advertising throughout the 1930s and ‘40s, often having two weekly programs on competing networks. The first, a variety show that ran for twelve seasons (1934-47) and combined musical and dramatic elements, was called Johnny Presents, essentially giving Roventini "top billing" above all the big name guests that appeared on the broadcasts. The cigarette company also sponsored Philip Morris Playhouse, a dramatic anthology series that lasted 14 seasons (1939-53), finally switching to television. Throughout it all, Johnny was a walking public relations campaign, reminding people of the product wherever he appeared. In exchange for $20,000 a year, Johnny promised never to appear in public without a bodyguard, and never to ride the New York subway during rush hour. When his salary rose to $50,000, PM insured his voice for the same amount. "Johnny" ads were prominent on billboards and in magazines. Always in his red bellhop’s uniform, he was seen "stepping out on storefronts all over America" to remind folks to smoke Philip Morris. When I Love Lucy became part of the PM family, Lucy and Desi joined Johnny in many of the company’s magazine print ads -- and artist’s renderings of the threesome were included on Philip Morris cigarette cartons at Christmas time. PM also issued a "Lucy Notebook" (filled with recipes and household hints) and a Lucy Rag Doll as product premiums. THIS EPISODE: July 29, 1949. CBS network. "The Iron Man". Sponsored by: Philip Morris, Revelation Pipe tobacco. The three owners of a failing New York bar decide to do in a barfly after taking out an insurance policy on his life. This is not as easy as it sounds. A well-done production of a classic (and true) story. William Spier (director, producer, editor), Sidney Miller, Jerry Hausner, Joseph Kearns, John Holbrook (announcer), Harold Swanton (writer), Lud Gluskin (music director), Art Ballinger (announcer), James Matthews. 29:35.

DATE: Sun, 22 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.03 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Hawk Larabie" - Mountain Central Railroad (07-18-47)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Hawk Larabie" - Mountain Central Railroad (Aired July 18, 1947) Hawk Durango, young western stalwart who avenged his father's murder in the desert town of Sundown wells, is now involved in a fast-paced sequence of adventure. Western drama endures as a favorite form of American entertainment, and "Hawk Durango" is endowed with all the exciting attributes of western drama in a modern setting. As advertised by KTUC (CBS Network), "If you've got a touch ofd sagebrush in your view...If you like the muted sounds of the wide-open spaces, the thunder of horses and the smack of leather and the crack of guns...then you'll want to listen Saturdays for Hawk Larabee. Hawk's thrilling adventures are right out of the Old West. Reach for yo radio, pahdnuh!" Principal Actors: Elliott Lewis, Frank Lovejoy, Barton Yarborough, Barney Phillips. Director: William N. Robson. Writer(s) Hawk Durango: Kenneth Perkins. Announcer(s): William Conrad. THIS EPISODE: July 18, 1947. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. Hawk is working for the Mountain Central Railroad when 40,000 railroad ties suspiciously go up in flames. The date is approximate. Barton Yarborough. 25 minutes.

DATE: Sun, 22 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.38 MB
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Hermits Cave - Plantation Mystery (1942)

Plantation Mystery (1942) The Hermit's cave Ghost stories ... weird stories ... of murder, too ... the Hermit knows them all. Horror stories with Mel Johnson and howling wolves (or dogs with indigestion?) in the background, obliterating some of the introduction. This syndicated show was one of the treats for the kiddies, cuddled up to their hollow-state radio sets to keep warm in Detroit, between 1940 and 1944. The show was also heard in Beverly Hills, CA in 1943-1944, a radio horror anthology series, syndicated by WJR Detroit in the mid-1930s, sponsored by Olga Coal after the first two years. As the wind howled, the ancient Hermit narrated his horror fantasies from his cave. The cackling character of the Hermit was played by John Kent, Charles Penman, Toby Grimmer, and Klock Ryder. William Conrad produced when the show moved to KMPC Los Angeles with Mel Johnson as the Hermit (1940-42), followed by John Dehner (1942-44). THIS EPISODE: 1942. Program #410. WJR, Detroit origination, World syndication. "Plantation Mystery". Sponsored by: Olga Coal. The owner of a plantation on Cook's Island seems to have changed. The natives are restless and a haunted soul returns for his revenge. The date is approximate. Next week's story is, "The Haunted Theatre." 28:11.

DATE: Sat, 21 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.06 MB
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The New Adventures Of Michael Shayne - The Case Of The Purloined Corpse (10-09-48)

The Case Of The Purloined Corpse (Aired October 9, 1948) All the above having been said, it was perhaps The New Adventures of Michael Shayne that was the most jarring of all Michael Shayne's incarnations. Bill Rousseau's image of Michael Shayne was more after the pattern of Jack Webb's characterizations of Pat Novak for Hire, or Johnny Madero, Pier 23--but amp'd up about 150% in the process. From some seventeen potential candidates, Rousseau felt that Jeff Chandler was the natural pick over his peers. Chandler could both amp up the electricity of Shayne's character and raise the introductory prologues about 10 decibels, as well as completely reinventing Michael Shayne in Chandler's own mold.Chandler was aided by no less than Jack Webb himself, who'd already collaborated often with Bill Rousseau in several projects and who leant his talent to the New Adventures of Michael Shayne--entirely uncredited. Indeed, many of Webb and Rousseau's old friends, allies and peers alike, leant their considerable weight to The New Adventures of Michael Shayne over it's compartively short run. But much like the Pat Novak, For Hire productions that competed with it, the important initial formula and ensemble cast, soon gave way to several other incarnations. Chandler left the production after some 26 performances, to be replaced, briefly, by Film actor, Donald Curtis for two broadcast episodes. Thereafter, Robert Sterling, best known for his work in Television's Topper as one of the ghosts with the most. And finally transitioning to Vinton Hayworth for the last twenty-five episodes of The Adventures of Michael Shayne. In even more of a transition, Michael Shayne returned to his roots in Florida for the last incarantion of Michael Shayne over Radio. Show Notes From The Digital-Deli THIS EPISODE: October 9, 1948 - Broadcaster's Guild syndication, AFRS rebroadcast. "The Case Of The Purloined Corpse". The body vanishes, and with good reason. Jeff Chandler, Jack Webb, William P. Rousseau (host, director), Brett Halliday (creator). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Sat, 21 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.58 MB
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Our Miss Brooks - Summer Vacation (09-04-55)

Summer Vacation (Aired September 4, 1955) Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, at the time CBS's West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to be the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Then CBS chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script---Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal---Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on CBS July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast---blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright---also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-1949, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this (award) two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. THIS EPISODE: September 4, 1955. "Summer Vacation" - CBS network. Sponsored by: Anacin, BiSoDol Mints. Mr. Brooks is spending his vacation at Crystal Lake, Miss Brooks is planning a surprise visit, but Mr. Boyton has a surprise of him own. Eve Arden, Gale Gordon, Leonard Smith, Jane Morgan, Bob Rockwell, Bob Sweeney, Larry Berns (producer, director), Wilbur Hatch (music), Gloria McMillan, Al Lewis (writer), Joe Quillan (writer), Richard Crenna. 28:28.

DATE: Sat, 21 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.52 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - The Story Of Billy Callico (1-27-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - The Story Of Billy Callico (Aired January 27, 1953) The Cisco Kid refers to a character found in numerous film, radio, television and comic book series based on the fictional Western character created by O. Henry in his 1907 short story "The Caballero's Way", published in the collection Heart of the West. In movies and television, the Kid was depicted as a heroic Mexican caballero, even though he was originally a cruel outlaw. The Cisco Kid came to radio October 2, 1942, with Jackson Beck in the title role and Louis Sorin as Pancho. With Vicki Vola and Bryna Raeburn in supporting roles and Michael Rye announcing, this series continued on Mutual until 1945. It was followed by another Mutual series in 1946, starring Jack Mather and Harry Lang, who continued to head the cast in the syndicated radio series of more than 600 episodes from 1947 to 1956. The radio episodes ended with one or the other of them making a corny joke about the adventure they had just completed. They would laugh, saying, "'oh, Pancho!" "'oh, Cisco!", before galloping off, while laughing. Renaldo returned to the role for the popular 156-episode Ziv Television series The Cisco Kid (1950–1956), notable as the first TV series filmed in color. The Cisco Kid's sidekick Pancho was portrayed by Leo Carrillo for the 1950s TV series. After a long absence, the character galloped back onto TV screens in the 1994 made-for-TV movie The Cisco Kid, starring Jimmy Smits, with Cheech Marin as Pancho. The TV episodes and the 1994 movie ended with one or the other of them making a corny joke about the adventure they had just completed. They would laugh, saying, "'ey, Pancho!" "'ey, Cisco!", before galloping off, while laughing, into the sunset. Spanish-styled Western theme music was heard as the credits rolled. THIS EPISODE: January 27, 1953. Program #55. Mutual-Don Lee network origination, Ziv syndication. "The Story Of Billy Calico". Commercials added locally. Jack Mather, Harry Lang. 27:25.

DATE: Sat, 21 Aug 2010
SIZE: 13.6 MB
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Fred Allen Show - Murder At Madison Square Garden (03-22-39)

Murder At Madison Square Garden (Aired March 22, 1939) Allen gave vaudeville itself a timeline of 1875–1925, but he actually left vaudeville a few years earlier, moving to work in such Shubert Brothers stage productions as The Passing Show in 1922. The show played well in its runup to Broadway but lasted only ten weeks at the Winter Garden Theatre. Allen did, however, take something far more lasting from the show: one of the show's chorus girls, Portland Hoffa, who became his wife. He also took good notices for his comic work in several of the productions, particularly Vogues and Greenwich Village Follies, and continued to develop his comic writing, even writing a column for Variety called "Near Fun." A salary dispute ended the column: Allen wanted only $60 a week to give up his theater work to become a full-time columnist, but his editor tried a sleight-of-hand based on the paper's ad rates to deny him. He spent his summer in Boston, honed his comic and writing skills even further, worked in a respectfully received duo that billed themselves as Fink and Smith, and played a few of the dying vaudeville houses. He returned to New York to the pleasant surprise that Portland Hoffa was taking instruction to convert to Roman Catholicism. After the couple married, Allen began writing material for them to use together ("With a vaudeville act, Portland and I could be together, even if we couldn't find any work"), and the couple divided their time between the show business circuit, Allen's New England family home and Old Orchard Beach, Maine, in summers.

DATE: Fri, 20 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.07 MB
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Macabre - The Crystalline Man (01-01-62)

The Crystalline Man (Aired January 1, 1962) Macabre - Macabre made the scene in November 13th 1961 and ran until January 8th 1962. Spooky and supernatural theme, Macabre was a Tokyo Studios, Far East Network of the Armed Forces Radio Service production. Creators of the series were William Verdier, who also starred in the series, and John F. Buey Jr., a program director with FEN Tokyo. All 8 episodes are currently in circulation. THIS EPISODE: January 1, 1962. Program #7. AFRTS-FEN origination. "The Crystalline Man". The discovery of a quartz sarcophagus and a crystal man asleep inside of it. Walt Sheldon, Alan Frank, William Virdier (performer, writer, director), Mitzi Hennessey, Christine Virdier, John Buey, Milton Radmilovich, James Sheldon, Al Lepage (announcer), Carolyn Johnston (associate director), Hiroshi Ono (technical supervisor), James Connolly (sound patterns), Bob Eddy (sound patterns). 30:21.

DATE: Fri, 20 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.93 MB
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Adventures By Morse - It's Dismal To Die (12-30-44) Part 3 of 3

It's Dismal To Die (Aired December 30, 1946) Part 3 of 3 Dates of production and the earliest broadcasts are uncertain: several Internet sites mention that the entire series was broadcast in 1944, but in the final two chapters of It's Dismal to Die, it is clearly stated that the Second World War has ended. Advertisements have been found for broadcasts in 1946 and 1949. The series was presented in 13-episode blocks (each containing two stories), with each ten-chapter story ending with a teaser for the following three-chapter story. The City of the Dead and A Coffin for the Lady are mentioned in the promotional recordings as the first and second story respectively. The order used below is the one found most often on the Internet. THIS EPISODE: December 30, 1944. Program #52. Carlton E. Morse Productions syndication. "It's Dismal To Die". Commercials added locally. Episode #3. "Bad Medicine For The Doctor." The end of the Nazi underground railroad. The last show of the series. Russell Thorson, Carlton E. Morse (producer, director, writer), Barton Yarborough, Gayne Whitman (announcer). 26:10.

DATE: Fri, 20 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.85 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Six Shooter" - Myra Barker (06-24-54)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Six Shooter" - Myra Barker (Aired June 24, 1954) The Six Shooter brought James Stewart to the NBC microphone on September 20, 1953, in a fine series of folksy Western adventures. Stewart was never better on the air than in this drama of Britt Ponset, frontier drifter created by Frank Burt. The epigraph set it up nicely: "The man in the saddle is angular and long-legged: his skin is sun dyed brown. The gun in his holster is gray steel and rainbow mother-of-pearl. People call them both The Six Shooter." Ponset was a wanderer, an easy-going gentleman and -- when he had to be -- a gunfighter. Stewart was right in character as the slow-talking maverick who usually blundered into other people's troubles and sometimes shot his way out. His experiences were broad, but The Six Shooter leaned more to comedy than other shows of its kind. Ponset took time out to play Hamlet with a crude road company. He ran for mayor and sheriff of the same town at the same time. He became involved in a delighful Western version of Cinderella, complete with grouchy stepmother, ugly sisters, and a shoe that didn't fit. And at Christmas he told a young runaway the story of A Christmas Carol, Substituting the original Dickens characters with Western heavies. Britt even had time to fall in love, but it was the age-old story of people from different worlds, and the romance was foredoomed despite their valiant efforts to save it. So we got a cowboy-into-the-sunset ending for this series, truly one of the bright spots of radio. Unfortunately, it came too late, and lasted only one season. It was a transcribed show, sustained by NBC and directed by Jack Johnstone. Basil Adlam provided the music and Frank Burt wrote the scripts. Hal Gibney announced. Information from John Dunning’s "Tune In Yesterday The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio". THIS EPISODE: June 24, 1954. "Myra Barker" - NBC network. Sustaining. The Six-Shooter proposes marriage. A well written show, the last of the series. The program may be dated September 27 or October 11, 1954. This is a network version. Jimmy Stewart, Jack Johnstone (director), Basil Adlam (music), Virginia Gregg, Howard McNear, Parley Baer, Frank Burt (creator, writer), D. J. Thompson, John Wald (announcer). 29:28.

DATE: Fri, 20 Aug 2010
SIZE: 14.6 MB
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MGM Theater Of The Air - Stablemates (02-03-50)

Stablemates (Aired February 3, 1950) "MGM Theater of the Air" wasn’t able to offer up a "big gun" host like Lux’s Cecil B. DeMille, so the series settled instead for Howard Dietz. Though not the legendary self-promoting showman that DeMille was, Dietz was certainly no slouch when it came to his chosen field; he was MGM’s vice president at the time and had also made his name as a publicist, lyricist of such tunes as "Dancing in the Dark". "By Myself," and "You and the Night and the Music" and librettist for such Broadway successes as "The Band Wagon" and "Revenge with Music". Assisted by announcer Ed Stokes, Dietz would announce with great fanfare the program's weekly production and guest star, serve as sort of a quasi-narrator throughout the broadcast, and then at the end would chat up the week’s star, allowing them to plug their latest project. Like most MGM radio productions - and, in fact, most syndicated series in general - "MGM Theater of the Air" had a fairly tight budget to work with each week and (if you’ll pardon the pun) the lion’s share usually went towards securing that week’s big name performer. But the production wasn’t pennywise and pound-foolish; they wisely chose the cream of New York radio actors - Gertrude Warner, Eric Dressler, Parker Fennelly, Alice Frost - for supporting roles in each production, expertly adapted by the likes of William Kendall Clark, Welborn Kelly and Joseph Ruscoll. Raymond Cass was the producer, with Marx B. Loeb directing and music composed and conducted by Joel Herron. THIS EPISODE: February 3, 1950. Program #17. WMGM, New York City origination, MGM syndication. "Stablemates". Commercials added locally. A young boy with a love for horses, a grizzled old vet with a taste for booze, a race horse with a chance for the big time, and a liberal dose of schmaltz. The date above is possibly the date of first broadcast on WMGM, New York City. Mickey Rooney, Parker Fennelly, Agnes Young, Ed Stokes (announcer), Howard Dietz (host). 58:13.

DATE: Thu, 19 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.81 MB
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Let George Do It - The Seven Dead Years (10-25-48)

The Seven Dead Years (Aired October 25, 1948) Let George Do It was a radio drama series produced by Owen and Pauline Vinson from 1946 to 1954. It starred Bob Bailey as detective-for-hire George Valentine (with Olan Soule stepping into the role in 1954). Clients came to Valentine's office after reading a newspaper carrying his classified ad: "Personal notice: Danger's my stock in trade. If the job's too tough for you to handle, you've got a job for me. George Valentine." The few earliest episodes were more sitcom than private eye shows, with a studio audience providing scattered laughter at the not-so-funny scripts. Soon the audience was banished, and George went from stumbling comedic hero to tough guy private eye, while the music became suspenseful. Valentine's secretary was Claire Brooks, aka Brooksie (Frances Robinson, Virginia Gregg, Lillian Buyeff). As Valentine made his rounds in search of the bad guys, he usually encountered Brooksie's kid brother, Sonny (Eddie Firestone), Lieutenant Riley (Wally Maher) and elevator man Caleb (Joseph Kearns). For the first few shows, Sonny was George's assistant, but he was soon relegated to an occasional character. Sponsored by Standard Oil, the program was broadcast on the West Coast Mutual Broadcasting System from October 18, 1946 to September 27, 1954, first on Friday evenings and then on Mondays. In its last season, transcriptions were aired in New York, Wednesdays at 9:30pm, from January 20, 1954 to January 12, 1955. John Hiestand was the program's announcer. Don Clark directed the scripts by David Victor and Jackson Gillis. The background music was supplied by Eddie Dunstedter, initially with a full orchestra. When television supplanted radio as the country's primary home entertainment, radio budgets got skimpier and skimpier and Dunstedter's orchestra was replaced by an organ. THIS EPISODE: October 25, 1948. Mutual-Don Lee network. "The Seven Dead Years". Sponsored by: Standard Oil, Chevron. An insurance investigator asks George's help to track down a killer...from seven years ago! Bob Bailey, Frances Robinson, Luis Van Rooten, Jay Novello, Don Diamond, Bob Bruce, Louise Arthur, Bud Hiestand (announcer), Don Clark (director), Eddie Dunstedter (composer, conductor), David Victor (writer), Herbert Little Jr. (writer). 29:46..

DATE: Thu, 19 Aug 2010
SIZE: 10.3 MB
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The CBS Radio Mystery Theater - Strange New Tomorrow (11-26-79)

Strange New Tomorrow (Aired November 26, 1979) The CBS Radio Mystery Theater (or CBSRMT) was an ambitious and sustained attempt to revive the great drama of old-time radio in the 1970s. Created by Himan Brown (who had by then become a radio legend due to his work on Inner Sanctum Mysteries and other shows dating back to the 1930s), and aired on affiliate stations across the CBS Radio network, the series began its long run on January 6, 1974. The final episode ran on December 31, 1982. The show was broadcast nightly and ran for one hour, including commercials. Typically, a week consisted of three to four new episodes, with the remainder of the week filled out with reruns. There were a total of 1399 original episodes broadcast. The total number of broadcasts, including reruns, was 2969. The late E.G. Marshall hosted the program every year but the final one, when actress Tammy Grimes took over. Each episode began with the ominous sound of a creaking door, slowly opening to invite listeners in for the evening's adventure. At the end of each show, the door would swing shut, with Marshall signing off, "Until next time, pleasant...dreams?" The CBS Radio Mystery Theater won the George A. Peabody Award in 1975. After eight years, the show ended its run on December 30, 1982. E. G. Marshall died on August 24, 1998. The CBS Radio Mystery Theater was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1990.

DATE: Thu, 19 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.97 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Dr. Six Gun - An Old Man's Atonement For Cowardice" (11-07-54)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Dr. Six Gun - An Old Man's Atonement For Cowardice" (Aired November 7, 1954) Doctor Gray Matson, played by Karl Weber, is a frontier physician based in a small western town in the 1870s called Frenchman's Ford. The shows are introduced by a recurring character named Pablo (Bill Griffis), a gypsy peddler who has a talking raven named Midnight as his sidekick. As his name implied, Matson was equally at home with using a gun or using his medical skills to solve problems. THIS EPISODE: November 7, 1954. Program #11. "An Old Man's Atonement for Cowardice" - NBC network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. A well-written story about seventy-year-old Pop Wheedon, a drunkard who deliberately degrades himself. Ernest Kinoy (writer), Fred Weihe (director, transcriber), George Lefferts (writer), Karl Weber, William Griffis. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Thu, 19 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.36 MB
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Lights Out - Kill (04-20-43)

Kill (Aired April 20, 1943) aka: "The Dream" Although in later years Lights Out would be closely associated with Oboler, he was always quick to credit Wyllis Cooper as the series' creator and spoke highly of the older author, calling him "the unsung pioneer of radio dramatic techniques" and the first person Oboler knew of who understood that radio drama could be an art form. In 1946, NBC brought Lights Out to TV in a series of four specials, broadcast live and produced by Fred Coe who also contributed three of the scripts. Interestingly, NBC asked Cooper to write the script for the premiere, "First Person Singular," which is told entirely from the point-of-view of an unseen murderer who kills his obnoxious wife and winds up being executed. Variety gave this first episode a rave review ("undoubtedly one of the best dramatic shows yet seen on a television screen") but Lights Out did not become a regular NBC TV series until 1949. Coe initially produced this second series but, for much of its run, the live 1949-1952 Lights Out TV series was sponsored by Admiral (makers of television sets and refrigerators), produced by Herbert Bayard Swope, Jr., directed by Laurence Schwab, Jr., and hosted by Frank Gallop. Critics were not always kind but the program drew huge ratings until competition from the massively popular sitcom I Love Lucy helped to kill it off. In 1972, NBC aired yet another TV incarnation of Lights Out, a pilot episode which was not well received. In fact, Oboler (who was then syndicating his The Devil and Mr. O radio show) made a point of announcing publicly that he had nothing to do with it. THIS EPISODE: April 20, 1943. Program #6. CBS net origination, syndicated rebroadcast. "Kill" Commercials added locally. The story of a man who never had dreamed until one day his dreams started. Were they pleasant? The story is also known as aka "The Dream". Arch Oboler (writer, host). 25:22.

DATE: Wed, 18 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.93 MB
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Adventures By Morse - It's Dismal To Die (12-23-46) Part 2 of 3

It's Dismal To Die (Aired December 23, 1946) Part 2 of 3 From January 16, 1939 to January 26, 1952, stories from the pen of Carlton E. Morse graced the airwaves. The main ones remembered are One Man's Family, I Love A Mystery and Adventures By Morse. Adventures By Morse related the escapades of Captain Bart Friday and Skip Turner, two San Francisco private investigators. Friday was a no-nonsense type, raised in the California. Turner was quite a bit the lady's man, complete with a laconic Southern accent. Their occasional work for U.S. Military Intelligence takes them around the globe. The series consisted of eight serials that ran from October 26, 1944 to October 18, 1945. The first serial, "City of the Dead", consisted of 10 episodes. The second serial was done in 3 episodes. The remainder of the series alternated between 10 and 3 30-minute episodes. The adventures cover the world as well as the world of adventure. They take place on a South Pacific island, South America, Cambodia and South Carolina plus other locations. They deal with murder, espionage, Nazis secret bases, kidnappers, voodoo and even snake worshippers. If you're looking for adventure, you'll find it here. THIS EPISODE: December 23, 1946. Program #51. Carlton E. Morse Productions syndication. "It's Dismal To Die" Part 2 of 3. Commercials added locally. A confrontation in the swamp. The evil Dr. Eckhardt outlines his plans. Russell Thorson, Carlton E. Morse (producer, director, writer), Barton Yarborough, Gayne Whitman (announcer). 26:10.

DATE: Wed, 18 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.75 MB
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My Friend Irma - Billy Boy The Boxer (02-09-48)

Billy Boy The Boxer (Aired February 9, 1948) Dependable, level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis, Diana Lynn) began each weekly radio program by narrating a misadventure of her innocent, bewildered roommate, Irma, a dim-bulb stenographer from Minnesota. The two central characters were in their mid-twenties. Irma had her 25th birthday in one episode; she was born on May 5. After the two met in the first episode, they lived together in an apartment rented from their Irish landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly (Jane Morgan, Gloria Gordon). Irma's boyfriend Al (John Brown) was a deadbeat, barely on the right side of the law, who had not held a job in years. Only someone like Irma could love Al, whose nickname for Irma was "Chicken". Al had many crazy get-rich-quick schemes, which never worked. Al planned to marry Irma at some future date so she could support him. Professor Kropotkin (Hans Conried), the Russian violinist at the Princess Burlesque theater, lived upstairs. He greeted Jane and Irma with remarks like, "My two little bunnies with one being an Easter bunny and the other being Bugs Bunny." The Professor insulted Mrs. O'Reilly, complained about his room and reluctantly became O'Reilly's love interest in an effort to make her forget his back rent. Irma worked for the lawyer, Mr. Clyde (Alan Reed). She had such an odd filing system that once when Clyde fired her, he had to hire her back again because he couldn't find anything. Useless at dictation, Irma mangled whatever Clyde dictated. Asked how long she had been with Clyde, Irma said, "When I first went to work with him he had curly black hair, then it got grey, and now it's snow white. I guess I've been with him about six months." Irma became less bright as the program evolved. She also developed a tendency to whine or cry whenever something went wrong, which was at least once every show. Jane had a romantic inclination for her boss, millionaire Richard Rhinelander (Leif Erickson), but he had no real interest in her. Other actors included Bea Benaderet. The TV version, seen on CBS from January 8, 1952 until June 25, 1954, was the first series telecast from the CBS Television City facility in Hollywood. The film My Friend Irma (1949) starred Marie Wilson and Diana Lynn but is mainly remembered today for introducing Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis to moviegoers, resulting in even more screen time for Martin and Lewis in the sequel, My Friend Irma Goes West (1950).

DATE: Wed, 18 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.62 MB
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The Creaking Door - Aunt Mae (1950)

Aunt Mae (1950) *Exact Date Is Unknown The Creaking Door was an old time radio series of horror and suspense shows originating in South Africa. There are at present anywhere from 34-37 extant episodes in MP3 circulation, yet no currently available program logs for the series indicate the year of the series' broadcast (though it was likely sometime in the 1950s, given the generally high audio quality of the available shows), or the total number of episodes, and only a handful of them are known by their broadcast order. The stories are thrillers in the Inner Sanctum vein, and generally thought of favorably by most fans of OTR.

DATE: Tue, 17 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.65 MB
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Rocky Fortune - Psychological Murder (03-16-54)

Psychological Murder (Aired March 16, 1954) In the days prior to From Here To Eternity, Frank Sinatra's popularity was waning and this private eye show was an attempt to remedy that. In it, Frank played Rocky Fortune, a "footloose and fancy-free young man," frequently unemployed, who took numerous, adventurous odd jobs. It was a relatively undistinguished series; definitely a "B grade" radio series, saved by Sinatra's charm and a tongue-in-cheek approach. Rocky Fortune appeared on NBC for only a short run of 25 or 26 shows. The lead character, who goes by the name of Rocky Fortune but whose real name is Rocko Fortunato, was played by Frank Sinatra. Rocky, always ready with a wise remark, seems to be a magnet for trouble, most often with the variety of odd jobs he takes. There is frequently a beautiful woman involved, some good girls, some bad. Rocky's a tough guy who stays just inside of the law but we get an occasional glimpse of a soft heart beneath the hard exterior. It's a character that Mr. Sinatra plays nicely. Employed or not, Rocky possesed a variety of skills. During the course of the series, he worked as a process server, museum tour guide, cabbie, bodyguard, chauffeur, truck driver, social director for a Catskills resort and a carny. He could also fake enough bass to play at weddings and bar-mitzvahs. For most of the series, Rocky received his job assignments from the Gridley Employment Agency, usually referred to as just "the agency". The only recurring character, throughout the series, besides Rocky himself, is the long-suffering Sergeant Hamilton J. Finger - a solid, although not-too-bright cop who works out of what is frequently referred to as "the Irish clubhouse," who seemed to be constantly running into Rocky, whether he wanted to or not. At about the same time, November 10, 1953 to July 9, 1954, Sinatra also starred in a musical show on NBC called To Be Perfectly Frank. And, no matter how you look at it, Rocky Fortune was really just another chance for the ever-ambitious Sinatra to be himself, and to promote his career. "From Here To Eternity" had opened that August, and Sinatra used the series to promote the film (and his Oscar nomination). As the series wound to a close and the date of the Academy Awards presentation drew near, it became a running gag that Rocky seemed to work the phrase "from here to eternity" into almost every show. Fortunately for his career, his Oscar for his role in Eternity came and rescued him from all this. Most scripts were written by Ernest Kinoy and George Lefferts, who also wrote Dimension X and X Minus One scripts. (Frequently, the same music bridges can be heard for X Minus One in early espisodes of this series.) Fred Weihe and Andrew Love directed. Show Notes From The OTRR Group THIS EPISODE: March 16, 1954. "Psychological Murder" - NBC network. Sustaining. Rocky witnesses the execution of the will of a wealthy woman who thinks that she's going insane. In a plot shamelessly stolen from the film, "Gaslight," the wife believes that she's going to kill her husband. This is a network version. Frank Sinatra, Andrew C. Love (director), Maurice Hart, Frank Gerstle, Betty Lou Gerson, Marvin Miller, Norm Sickle (writer). 24:51.

DATE: Tue, 17 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.93 MB
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Adventures By Morse - It's Dismal To Die (12-16-44) Part 1 of 3

It's Dismal To Die (Aired December 16, 1946) Part 1 of 3 Adventures by Morse was a 52-episode syndicated adventure series produced, written and directed by Carlton E. Morse shortly after NBC canceled his I Love a Mystery series. Captain Bart Friday was a globe-trotting San Francisco-based private investigator, portrayed during the series by Elliott Lewis, David Ellis and Russell Thorson. Friday's sidekick from Texas, Skip Turner, was played mostly by Jack Edwards and occasionally by Barton Yarborough. The tales covered such areas as espionage, kidnapping and murder, along with secret Nazi bases, snake worshipers and voodoo. The 52 30-minute episodes (and two sales pitches) were produced in the mid-1940s. Dates of production and the earliest broadcasts are uncertain: several Internet sites mention that the entire series was broadcast in 1944, but in the final two chapters of It's Dismal to Die, it is clearly stated that the Second World War has ended. Advertisements have been found for broadcasts in 1946 and 1949. The series was presented in 13-episode blocks (each containing two stories), with each ten-chapter story ending with a teaser for the following three-chapter story. The City of the Dead and A Coffin for the Lady are mentioned in the promotional recordings as the first and second story respectively. The order used below is the one found most often on the Internet. THIS EPISODE: December 16, 1946. Program #50. Carlton E. Morse Productions syndication. "It's Dismal To Die" Part 1 of 3. Commercials added locally. Episode #1. In search of a kidnap victim in the Dismal Swamp. Skip Turner and Captain Friday meet "The Dummy," "Morales," and Herr Doctor Eckhardt. Russell Thorson, Carlton E. Morse (producer, director, writer), Barton Yarborough, Gayne Whitman (announcer). 26:48.

DATE: Tue, 17 Aug 2010
SIZE: 8.33 MB
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Afloat With Henry Morgan - 3 Episodes From 1932

(Episode 11) "Morgan Confies About Necklace To Jeffrey" (Episode 12) "Delores And Diaz Plot Against Morgan" (Episode 13) "Delores Starts Her Seduction Of Jeffrey". Afloat with Henry Morgan was a 52 episode Australian series from, it is generally thought - 1933. Each episode was about 12 minutes long and the series was probably aimed at the youth market. It is not to be confused with the US show - 'The Henry Morgan Show'. It was produced by and starred George Edwards, who also produced Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Frankenstein, Corsican Brothers, and Son of Porthos, all Australian series as well. We believe that Maurice Francis, an enthusiastic writer, and Nell Sterling, two of George Edwards long-time collaborators, were also featured in 'Afloat With Henry Morgan'. To save money, Edwards played a variety of different roles and became known as 'the Man With A Thousand Voices'. It was a ventriloquial gift that encompassed small children, every variety of male voice, aged women, and foreigners. The maximum number of voices Edwards produced for a single scene was six; in the course of a single episode he would often double it. Show Notes From The OTRR Group

DATE: Tue, 17 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.58 MB
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Author's Playhouse - A Miracle In The Rain (07-29-44)

A Miracle In The Rain (Aired July 29, 1944) Author's Playhouse was an anthology radio drama series, created by Wynn Wright, that aired on the NBC Blue Network from March 5, 1941 until October 1941. It then moved to the NBC Red Network where it was heard until June 4, 1945. Philip Morris was the sponsor in 1942-43. Premiering with "Elementals" by Stephen Vincent Benét, the series featured adaptations of stories by famous authors, such as “Mr. Mergenthwirker’s Lobbies” by Nelson Bond, "The Snow Goose" by Paul Gallico, "The Monkey's Paw" by W.W. Jacobs, "The Piano" by William Saroyan and "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" by James Thurber. Cast members included Curley Bradley, John Hodiak, Marvin Miller, Nelson Olmsted, Fern Persons, Olan Soule and Les Tremayne. Orchestra conductors for the program were Joseph Gallicchio, Rex Maupin and Roy Shield. Directors included Norman Felton, Homer Heck and Fred Weihe. The series was a precursor to several NBC radio programs of the late 1940s and early 1950s: The World's Great Novels, NBC Presents: Short Story and The NBC University Theater. THIS EPISODE: July 29, 1944. NBC network. "Miracle In The Rain". Sustaining. A tender love story of a girl and a soldier on leave she meets in a middle of a rainstorm. Ben Hecht (author). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Mon, 16 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.98 MB
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The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe - The Name To Remember (04-04-49)

The Name To Remember (Aired April 9, 1949) By 1949 the show had the largest audience in radio. CBS capitalized on the popularity of Philip Marlowe to introduce a look-alike show a few months later, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar. During the period both shows were broadcast, Johnny Dollar played second fiddle to the popular Philip Marlowe. Even after Marlowe went off the air in 1951, Dollar remained an average detective show. That was to end Oct 3, 1955 when Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar changed everything; the writers, the format to 15 minutes and the lead actor. The new 15 minute episodes staring Bob Bailey dominated detective/mystery drama from then until its last broadcast, September 30, 1962. That date and that broadcast are generally considered as the last of the radio drama broadcasts. Philip Marlowe continued to find limited success in the movies and television in America and England after his radio career ended. Several quality presentations of Chandler's character were produced by the BBC in the 1990's. But the death of Chandler's wife pulled him into severe depression and put an end any effective writing. His last unfinished book, Poodle Springs, was finished by Robert B. Parker, a good friend who tried to remain faithful to the Chandler style. Unfortunately, the critics did not agree. Philip Marlowe, the gritty, no nonsense American detective lived and vanished from the quill of a writer raised in Europe. He will remain a classic buried in the modern world of fighting crime with technology. THIS EPISODE: April 9, 1949. CBS network. "The Name To Remember". Sustaining. Eddie Mallet is being followed by a gorilla in a tee shirt with muscles out-to-here. Marlowe is hired to find out why, but not soon enough to save Eddie. Gene Levitt (writer), Gerald Mohr, Jack Moyles, Jeanne Bates, Jeff Corey, Jerry Hausner, Mel Dinelli (writer), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), Paul Frees, Raymond Chandler (creator), Richard Aurandt (music), Robert Mitchell (writer), Roy Rowan (announcer), Yvonne Peattie. 29:37.

DATE: Mon, 16 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.85 MB
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The Whistler - The Weakling (01-03-43)

The Weakling (Aired January 3, 1943) The Whistler is one of American radio's most popular mystery dramas, with a 13-year run from May 16, 1942 until September 22, 1955.The Whistler was the most popular West Coast-originated program with its listeners for many years. It was sponsored by the Signal Oil Company: "That whistle is your signal for the Signal Oil program, The Whistler." Each episode of The Whistler began with the sound of footsteps and a person whistling. (The Saint radio series with Vincent Price used a similar opening.) The haunting signature theme tune was composed by Wilbur Hatch and featured Dorothy Roberts performing the whistling with the orchestra. The stories followed an effective formula in which a person's criminal acts were typically undone either by an overlooked but important detail or by their own stupidity. On rare occasions a curious twist of fate caused the story to end happily for the episode's protagonist. Ironic twist endings were a key feature of each episode. The Whistler himself narrated, often commenting directly upon the action in the manner of a Greek chorus, taunting the criminal from an omniscient perspective. Bill Forman had the title role of host and narrator. Others who portrayed the Whistler at various times were Gale Gordon, Joseph Kearns, Marvin Miller (announcer for The Whistler and The Bickersons and later as Michael Anthony on TV's The Millionaire), Bill Johnstone (who had the title role on radio's The Shadow from 1938 to 1943) and Everett Clarke. Cast members included Hans Conried, Joseph Kearns, Cathy Lewis, Elliott Lewis, Gerald Mohr, Lurene Tuttle and Jack Webb. Writer-producer J. Donald Wilson established the tone of the show during its first two years, and he was followed in 1944 by producer-director George Allen. Other directors included Sterling Tracy and Sherman Marks with final scripts by Joel Malone and Harold Swanton. Of the 692 episodes, over 200 no longer exist. In 1946, a local Chicago version of The Whistler with local actors aired Sundays on WBBM, sponsored by Meister Brau beer. The Whistler was adapted into a film noir series from Columbia Pictures. The first seven featured actor Richard Dix (playing a different character in each). The "Voice of the Whistler" was provided by an uncredited Otto Forrest. THIS EPISODE: January 3, 1943. CBS network. "The Weakling". Sustaining. Will the honest District Attorney prosecute his own son for murder? Gerald Mohr, Hans Conried, Wilbur Hatch (composer, conductor). 30:09.

DATE: Mon, 16 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.13 MB
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Philo Vance - The Backstage Murder Case (09-21-48)

The Backstage Murder Case (Aired September 21, 1948) Philo Vance featured in 12 crime novels written by S. S. Van Dine (the pen name of Willard Huntington Wright), published in the 1920s and 1930s. During that time, Vance was immensely popular in books, movies, and on the radio. He was portrayed as a stylish, even foppish dandy, a New York bon vivant possessing a highly intellectual bent. The novels were chronicled by his friend Van Dine (who appears as a kind of Dr. Watson figure in the books as well as the author). As Van Dine described the character in the first of the novels, The Benson Murder Case: Vance was what many would call a dilettante, but the designation does him an injustice. He was a man of unusual culture and brilliance. An aristocrat by birth and instinct, he held himself severely aloof from the common world of men. In his manner there was an indefinable contempt for inferiority of all kinds. In the same book, Van Dine detailed Vance's physical features: He was unusually good-looking, although his mouth was ascetic and cruel...there was a slightly derisive hauteur in the lift of his eyebrows...His forehead was full and sloping--it was the artist's, rather than the scholar's, brow. His cold grey eyes were widely spaced. His nose was straight and slender, and his chin narrow but prominent, with an unusually deep cleft...Vance was slightly under six feet, graceful, and giving the impression of sinewy strength and nervous endurance. THIS EPISODE: September 21, 1948. Program #11. ZIV Syndication. "The Backstage Murder Case". Commercials added locally. After a theatre has been robbed, the star receives a threatening letter and her understudy is murdered. Jackson Beck. 27:19.

DATE: Mon, 16 Aug 2010
SIZE: 4.80 MB
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The Adventures Of Horatio Hornblower - Reception With The Czar (02-13-53)

Reception With The Czar (Aired February 13, 1953) Horatio Hornblower is a fictional Royal Navy officer who is the protagonist of a series of novels by C. S. Forester, and later the subject of films and television programs. The original Hornblower tales began with the appearance of a junior Royal Navy Captain on independent duty on a secret mission to Central America, though later stories would fill out his earlier years, starting with an unpromising beginning as a seasick midshipman. As the Napoleonic Wars progress, he gains promotion steadily as a result of his skill and daring, despite his initial poverty and lack of influential friends. Eventually, after surviving many adventures in a wide variety of locales, he rises to the pinnacle of his profession, promoted to Rear admiral of the Red Squadron, knighted as a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath, and named the 1st Baron Hornblower. Ernest Hemingway is quoted as saying, "I recommend Forester to everyone literate I know," and Winston Churchill stated, "I find Hornblower admirable." There are many parallels between Hornblower and real naval officers of the period, including Joseph Needham Tayler, Thomas Cochrane and Horatio Nelson. The name "Horatio" was inspired by the character in William Shakespeare's Hamlet and chosen also because of its association with contemporary figures such as Nelson. The name Hornblower was probably derived from the American film producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr., with whom C. S. Forester had been working prior to writing the first Hornblower novel. Forester's original inspiration was an old copy of the Naval Chronicle, which described the effective dates of the Treaty of Ghent. Because of the time required to communicate around the world, it was possible for two countries to still be at war in one part of the world after a peace was obtained months before in another. The burdens that this placed on captains far from home led him to a character struggling with the stresses of a "man alone". At the same time, Forester wrote the body of the works carefully to avoid entanglements with real world history, so Hornblower is always off on another mission when a great naval victory occurs during the Napoleonic Wars. Broadcast 1952; Transcribed in England for the BBC; aired in U.S. on CBS, then again on ABC in 1954 and Mutual in 1957.  Starring Michael Redgrave as Horatio Hornblower. THIS EPISODE: February 13, 1953. "Reception With The Czar" - Program #30. Radio Luxembourg, Towers Of London syndication. Commercials added locally. A visit to the palace of the Czar, and an assassination attempt is foiled. Commodore Hornblower almost succumbs to the charms of a very friendly countess. The program closing has been deleted. Michael Redgrave, C. S. Forester (creator), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor), Harry Alan Towers (producer, director), Philo Higby (writer). 24:45.

DATE: Sun, 15 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.97 MB
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Screen Director's Playhouse -Tomorrow Is Forever (01-13-50)

Tomorrow Is Forever (Aired January 13, 1950) Screen Director's Playhouse is a popular radio anthology series which brought leading Hollywood actors to the NBC microphones beginning in 1949. The radio program broadcast adaptations of films, and original directors of the films were sometimes involved in the productions, although their participation was usually limited to introducing the radio adaptations, and a brief "curtain call" with the cast and host at the end of the program. The series later had a brief run on television. The radio version ran for 122 episodes and aired on NBC from January 9, 1949 to September 28, 1951 under several different titles: NBC Theater, Screen Director's Guild Assignment, Screen Director's Assignment and, as of July 1, 1949, Screen Director's Playhouse. Actors on the radio series included Fred Astaire, Lucille Ball, Charles Boyer, Claudette Colbert, Ronald Colman, Gary Cooper, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Marlene Dietrich, Kirk Douglas, Irene Dunne, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Henry Fonda, Cary Grant, William Holden, Burt Lancaster, James Mason, Gregory Peck, William Powell, Edward G. Robinson, Norma Shearer, Barbara Stanwyck, James Stewart, John Wayne, and Loretta Young. The television version was broadcast for one season of 35 half hour episodes on NBC, airing from October 5, 1955 to September 12, 1956. THIS EPISODE: January 13, 1950. NBC network. "Tomorrow Is Forever". Sponsored by: RCA. A soldier badly wounded during WW I remains away from his wife for over twenty years. A fine melodrama. Claudette Colbert, Jeff Chandler, Sam Edwards, John McIntire, Jimmy Wallington (announcer), Irving Pichel (screen director). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Sun, 15 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.27 MB
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Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Meek Die Slowly (04-03-45)

The Meek Die Slowly (Aired April 3, 1945) Taking its name from a popular series of mystery novels, Inner Sanctum Mysteries debuted over NBC’s Blue Network in January 1941. Inner Sanctum Mysteries featured one of the most memorable and atmospheric openings in radio history: an organist hit a dissonant chord, a doorknob turned and the famous “creaking door” slowly began to open. Every week, Inner Sanctum Mysteries told stories of ghosts, murderers and lunatics. Produced in New York, the cast usually consisted of veteran radio actors, with occasional guest appearances by such Hollywood stars Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre and Claude Rains. What made Inner Sanctum Mysteries unique among radio horror shows was its host, a slightly-sinister sounding man originally known as “Raymond.” The host had a droll sense of humor and an appetite for ghoulish puns, and his influence can be seen among horror hosts everywhere, from the Crypt-Keeper to Elvira. Raymond Edward Johnson was the show’s host until 1945; Paul McGrath took over the role until the show left the air in 1952. Producer Hiram Brown would utilize the creaking door again in the 1970s, when he produced and directed The CBS Radio Mystery Theater. Inner Sanctum Mysteries was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1988. THIS EPISODE: April 3, 1945. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Meek Die Slowly". A ghastly story that starts with "Mr. Narco" stabbing Jane Carter to death with a pair of garden shears. Arnold Moss sports a delightful German-Transylvanian accent. The music fill after the system cue has been deleted. The script was again used on "Inner Sanctum" on September 7, 1952. Arnold Moss, Paul McGrath (host). 24:42.

DATE: Sun, 15 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.84 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Tales Of The Texas Rangers" - The Ice Man (03-02-52)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Tales Of The Texas Rangers" - The Ice Man (03-02-52) Tales of the Texas Rangers, a western adventure old-time radio drama, premiered on July 8, 1950, on the US NBC radio network and remained on the air through September 14, 1952. Movie star Joel McCrea starred as Texas Ranger Jayce Pearson, who used the latest scientific techniques to identify the criminals and his faithful horse, Charcoal (or "Charky," as Jayce would sometimes refer to him), to track them down. The shows were reenactments of actual Texas Ranger cases.The series was produced and directed by Stacy Keach, Sr., and was sponsored for part of its run by Wheaties. Captain Manuel T. "Lone Wolf" Gonzaullas, a Ranger for 30 years and who was said to have killed 31 men during his career, served as consultant for the series. The series was adapted for television from 1955 to 1957 and produced by Screen Gems. For the TV version, Willard Parker took over the role of Jace Pearson. On radio, Pearson often worked by request with a local sheriff's office or police department but on the TV show, he had a regular partner, Ranger Clay Morgan (who had been an occasional character on the radio show), played by Harry Lauter. During the opening and closing credits of the TV show, the actors would march toward the camera and sing the theme song, "These Are Tales of Texas Rangers", to the tune of "The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You", which is also the tune of "I've Been Working on the Railroad". The radio series used contemporary cases and modern detective methods to solve crimes; it was a procedural drama, in many ways Dragnet with a Western flavor. The TV show was aimed at kids (and aired on Saturday mornings) and was more of a traditional Western (with chases and shoot-outs). The TV series did both modern cases and cases set in the "Old West." With new cases using a car with horse float to get the rangers to their destinations it always made sure that the use of horses was only a step away. With older themes they would always ride into town on the horses to mete out their justice, they wore differing ranger attire for new and old scenes, also their weaponry was totally different. THIS EPISODE: March 2, 1952. NBC network. "The Ice Man". Sustaining. Based on the events of September 17, 1948. A strange burglar who eats before he robs and who wields a mean ice pick is finally tracked down by the Rangers. Joel McCrea, Stacy Keach (producer, director), Hal Gibney (announcer), Tony Barrett, Lillian Buyeff, Whitfield Connor, Parley Baer, Phil Harris (NBC promo), Alice Faye (NBC promo), Bill Forman (NBC promo), Jack Paar (NBC promo). 29:35.

DATE: Sun, 15 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.70 MB
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Radio City Playhouse - Level Crossing (08-08-49)

Level Crossing (Aired August 8, 1949) Radio City Playhouse was one of the last of a long series of premium Drama productions NBC offered as flagship, sustaining productions over the years. As with it's previous premium dramatic and Classic music productions, NBC spared no apparent expense to mount these flagship efforts. And it shows. NBC, yet again, brings the greatest voice talent, writing, and technical direction to this anthology of wonderful, popular modern dramas. NBC's previous dramatic sustaining productions consisted of either the pure Classics, or Modern Stage Plays from the 19th and 20th Centuries. This series of three seasons tended to feature a delightful mix of both contemporary original radio plays and classic dramas, backed by the very finest voice talent on contract with NBC. But Director Harry Junkin also introduced several new talents into the mix, which made for a wonderful combination of both tried and true productions with just enough orginal dramas and writers to keep the series both timely and timeless. As was the hallmark of all of NBC's corporate sustaining productions, the staff, music, sound engineering and voice talent were absolutely top-drawer from top to bottom and beginning to end. Even the newcomers the series showcased during its three seasons were remarkably talented young finds in their own right. This is yet another in a long, distinguished line of absolutely impeccable NBC-sustained productions, and its historic cultural contribution to The Golden Age of Radio merits inclusion in any serious Radio Collector's active holdings--active as in, the ones they actually listen to from time to time. THIS EPIOSDE: August 8, 1949. Program #50. NBC network. "Level Crossing". Sustaining. A man finally decides to kill the blackmailer who knows his terrible secret. However, he changes his mind at the last moment. The program is also known as, "NBC Short Story." James Monks, Charles Penman, Connie Lembcke, Ralph Bell, Harry W. Junkin (host, adaptor, producer, director), Roy Shield (composer, conductor), Fred Collins (announcer), F. Gills Croft (author), David Gothard, Cathleen Cordell. 29:29.

DATE: Sun, 15 Aug 2010
SIZE: 3.37 MB
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Phyl Coe Mysteries - Murder In The Sky (02-19-36)

Murder In The Sky (Aired February 19, 1936) On-air contests weren't unknown to Radio by the mid-1930s. Many early broadcast sponsors distributed premiums--both free and at nominal cost--via their serial adventure programs, serial melodramas or variety programs. But Philco's 1937 national promotion was arguably the most extensive, lucrative and expensive Radio promotion in the history of Radio to that point. Philco mounted a year-long, highly aggressive campaign on many fronts, to coincide with production of their Ten Millionth commerical radio set--"the famous High-Fidelity 116xx with Automatic Tuning on the new Inclined Control Panel." "Phyl" Coe Radio Mysteries (1937) was the third major wave in their 12-month promotional campaign. In addition to the "Phyl" Coe Radio Mysteries, Philco implemented several 'Philco Week' promotions throughout the year. They also created a number of replica Ten Millionth Philco Model 116xx Radios for sale throughout the year. They ran a concurrent local promotion through all of their dealer outlets by which consumers could fill out local entry blanks in a letter counting game for prizes of as much as $50 certificates. In addition to the Ten Millionth Radio Replica promotion they offered a booklet describing the story of the Ten Millionth Philco Radio. Mail-in forms were included in most newspapers for requesting the Story of the Ten Millionth Radio as well as entry forms for the "Phyl" Coe Radio Mysteries contest. The "Phyl" Coe Radio Mysteries contest was by far the most expensive and ambitious promotion of the year. Initially targetted for 100 subscriber stations, by the time the first series of installments aired, a reported 243 subscriber stations had signed up for the program. Philco had budgeted a reported $500,000 for the promotion, but the almost 150% increase in demand for the transcriptions reportedly raised the cost of the 16-week promotion to in excess of $1 million. The advance promotion of the series preceded the airing of the first installments by as much as two months in some markets. By the time the first installment aired, mystery and detective clubs had sprung up across the country in anticipation of pooling their resources to solve the advertised sixteen mystery installments. The buzz they created obviously worked, as evidenced by the dramatic increase in demand for the subscription. Philco clearly targetted specific geographic markets in various locations across the U.S., as evidenced by far more aggressive, ambitious and extensive local programs which flooded the targetted areas' newspapers with Philco spot ads, local dealer ads, and updates on the winners of each installment in the series.

DATE: Sat, 14 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.55 MB
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The Adventures Of Frank Merriwell - The Thunderstorm Mystery (06-19-48)

The Thunderstorm Mystery (Aired June 19, 1948) Frank Merriwell is a fictional character appearing in a series of novels and short stories by Gilbert Patten, who wrote under the pseudonym Burt L. Standish. The character also appears in numerous radio serials and comic books based on the stories. The model for all later American juvenile sports fiction, Merriwell excelled at football, baseball, basketball, crew and track at Yale while solving mysteries and righting wrongs. He played with great strength and received traumatic blows without injury. A biographical entry on Patten noted dryly that Frank Merriwell "had little in common with his creator or his readers." Patten offered some background on his character: "The name was symbolic of the chief characteristics I desired my hero to have. Frank for frankness, merry for a happy disposition, well for health and abounding vitality." Merriwell's classmates observed, "He never drinks. That's how he keeps himself in such fine condition all the time. He will not smoke, either, and he takes his exercise regularly. He is really a remarkable freshie." Merriwell originally appeared in a series of magazine stories starting April 18, 1896 ("Frank Merriwell: or, First Days at Fardale") in Tip Top Weekly, continuing through 1912, and later in dime novels and comic books. Patten would confine himself to a hotel room for a week to write an entire story. The Frank Merriwell comic strip began in 1928, continuing until 1936. Daily strips from 1934 provided illustrations for the 1937 Big Little Book. There are at least three generations of Merriwells: Frank, his half-brother Dick, and Frank's son, Frank Jr. There is a marked difference between Frank and Dick. Frank usually handled challenges on his own. Dick has mysterious friends and skills that help him, especially an old Indian friend without whom the stories would not have been quite as interesting. A film serial entitled The Adventures of Frank Merriwell was created by Universal Studios in 1936. THIS EPISODE: June 19, 1948. NBC network. "The Thunderstorm Mystery". Sustaining. While hiking in the mountains, Frank and his friends take shelter in a cave when an avalanche begins. A hermit's cabin is nearly buried. The system cue has been deleted. Lawson Zerbe, Hal Studer, Elaine Rost, Burt L. Standish (creator), Paul Taubman (organ), William Welch (writer), Pat Hosley, Will Geer, Lamont Johnson, Harry W. Junkin (director), Joe Latham, Ruth Braun (writer), Gilbert Braun (writer). 29:20.

DATE: Sat, 14 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.26 MB
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Police Headquarters - 2 Episodes From 1932

2 Episodes: "The Warehouse Job" and "James Davis Killed" (1932) Bruce Eells Associates produced this 15-minute series that was then an early syndication, via broadcasters Program Syndicate/Bruce Eells and Associates syndication. As was usual then, music filled the first part of the show, so that the local station announcer could do a commercial or two. So the writer and actors were left with a 12 1/2-minute mystery. "The IOU Murder" spins the tale of a mansion murder in which the shot is not suicide. "Paid in Full" is a plot twister in which the guilty is known, but can't be pinned with the crime. In the "Stolen Brain" a professor's body has been has "gone missing" and the brain is held for $35,000 ransom. That's a lot of money even today for a mass of "little grey cells." In another, Mrs. North is found bound and gagged by a dead man in her bedroom. A woman is pushed out from a speeding roadster owned by an Italian with an airtight alibi, but the dead dame has twin brothers who swear vengeance on him anyway. An overdose of cocaine kills a recluse who hasn't left his room in 20 years. A crook cashes a check from a Count who may be a no-count. A boxer is permanently KO'd after a big fight, but the cops finger one of three men taking a shower as the killer. Pretty aggressive stuff for 1932! The shows have very few wrinkles for a 70-year-old (they sound pretty darn good). Twists and turns in plot are as many as the minutes allow. These are fun to hear! There isn't much information on who did the acting. But radio in 1932 was still in its beginnings as a national pastime. This show is a great example of those still early days of radio, when the concept of syndication was still in its infancy. The networks refused to use pre-recorded disks until after WWII! This organization was recording a show on acetate disks and then sending copies out (carefully, as they could break!) to customer stations across America. It was, for that era, very sophisticated media merchandising!

DATE: Fri, 13 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.64 MB
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Dragnet - Garbage Chute Murderer (12-15-49)

Garbage Chute Murderer (Aired December 15, 1949) The original Dragnet starring Jack Webb as Sergeant Joe Friday ran on radio from June 3rd, 1949 to February 26th, 1957; and on television from December 16th, 1951 to August 23rd, 1959, and from January 12th, 1967 to April 16th, 1970. All of these versions ran on NBC. There were two Dragnet feature films, a straight adaptation starring Jack Webb in 1954, and a comedy spoof in 1987. There were also television revivals, without Webb, in 1989 and 2003. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters. Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor. Gradually, Friday's deadpanned, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop: tough, but not hard; conservative, but caring". Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a long time radio actor. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated, and sparse -- influenced by the hard-boiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving, but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step-by-step. From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. Webb was a stickler for accurate details, and Dragnet used many authentic touches, such as LAPD's actual radio call sign, KMA-367, and the names of many real department officials, such as Ray Pinker and Lee Jones of the Crime Lab, or Chief of Detectives, Thad Brown. THIS EPISODE: December 15, 1949. Program #29. NBC network. "The Garbage Chute Murder". Sponsored by: Fatima, Velvet Pipe Tobacco. Laura Barclay has been strangled with a lamp cord. The killer seems to have entered through an unused garbage chute. Jack Webb, Barton Yarborough. 29:21.

DATE: Fri, 13 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.48 MB
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U S Postal Inspector - National Grave Marker Co. (10-26-47)

National Grave Marker Co. (Aired October 26, 1947) Warren William (December 2, 1894 – September 24, 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born the son of Freeman E. and Frances Krech, as Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. He had a certain physical resemblance to John Barrymore. He attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. After moving from Broadway to Hollywood in the silent period, he reached his peak as a leading man in early 1930s pre-Production Code films. He was a contract player at the Warner Bros. studio and was known for portraying amoral businessmen, lawyers, and other heartless types, including the Sam Spade character (renamed "Ted Shane") in the second filming of The Maltese Falcon, called Satan Met a Lady (1936) with Bette Davis. He also played sympathetic roles, however, as in Imitation of Life, in which he portrayed Claudette Colbert's love interest. He appeared as her love interest again that year, when he played Julius Caesar to her Cleopatra in Cecil B. DeMille's version of Cleopatra. And he was the swashbucking d'Artagnan in the 1939 version of The Man in the Iron Mask, directed by James Whale. William was the first to portray Erle Stanley Gardner's fictional defense attorney Perry Mason on the big screen and starred in four fast paced, comical, and highly entertaining Perry Mason mysteries. He also played Raffles-like reformed jewel thief The Lone Wolf for Columbia Pictures beginning with The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt (1939) with Ida Lupino and Rita Hayworth, and he starred as detective Philo Vance in two films in that series, 1934's The Dragon Murder Case and 1939's The Gracie Allen Murder Case (billed below Gracie Allen). In 1923, he married Helen Barbara Nelson; Mrs. Helen B. Krech - who also survived him - was three years his senior. Warren William died on 24 September 1948 in Hollywood, California of multiple myeloma. For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Warren William has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1551 Vine Street. A biography, Warren William: Magnificent Scoundrel of Pre-Code Hollywood, will be released in the fall of 2010. THIS EPISODE: October 26, 1947. An audition recording. Postal Inspector Jefferson Black cracks "one of the vilest schemes ever perpetrated." "The National Grave Marker Company" plans to swindle the parents of dead soldiers. The program may be dated February, 1947. Warren William, Robert Webster Light (director, producer, writer), Ken Christy (doubles), Howard McNear, Ken Cripine (writer). 28:10.

DATE: Fri, 13 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.91 MB
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Tums Hollywood Theater - Sitting Duck (12-18-51)

Sitting Duck (Aired December 17, 1952) The Skippy Hollywood Theatre ran from 1941 to 1949 and featured pre-recorded dramas that were played on the air at a different time. This was one of the first variants from live drama plays and was very successful. Of course, it was also the launching pad of Skippy Peanut Butter into the mainstream. In 1951, the Hollywood Theater was sponsored by Tums anti-acid tablets. Little more is known about this series and the following program is considered extremely rare. THIS EPISODE: December 17, 1952. NBC network. "Sitting Duck". Sponsored by: Tums, N. R. Tablets (Nature's Remedy). A man bets $20,000 that he can sit atop a flagpole for one hundred days. He sees a murder happen...on the 98th day! Cesar Romero, Sheldon Leonard, William Conrad, Don Wilson (announcer), Lillian Buyeff, Sidney Miller, Jack Johnstone (director), Jeff Alexander (composer, conductor), Muffet Peter (writer), Frank DeFelita (writer). 29:24.

DATE: Fri, 13 Aug 2010
SIZE: 13.1 MB
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The Day Of The Triffids [Part 2 of 2] 1957

The Day Of The Triffids [Part 2 of 2] 1957 A shower of meteorites produces a glow that blinds anyone that looks at it. As it was such a beautiful sight, most people were watching, and as a consequence, 99% of the population go blind. In the original novel, this chaos results in the escape of some Triffids: experimental plants that are capable of moving themselves around and attacking people. In the film version, however, the Triffids are not experimental plants. Instead they are space aliens whose spores have arrived in an earlier meteor shower. The novel was adapted to radio (readings) by the BBC as early as 1953. BBC radio series followed in 1957 and 1968 (Giles Cooper). The same year it was adopted in Germany by Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR) Köln (Cologne), translated by Hein Bruehl and most recently re-broadcast as a four episode series on WDR5 in January 2008. Further BBC radio productions followed in 1971, 1973 and 1980. In 2001 writer Lance Dann adapted the series in two hour long episodes for the BBC World Service.

DATE: Thu, 12 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.14 MB
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The Fat Man - Murder Seeks A Lost Penny (1952)

Murder Seeks A Lost Penny (1952) *The Exact Date Is Unknown Imagine if you will a Friday evening way back in 1948. A young boy sits an the floor with barely concealed impatience in front of the family radio, waiting for his favorite serial to begin. The radio is one of those huge mahogany consoles that you associate with old time radio. It dwarfs the boy. At 8 o'clock the voice of Charles Irving is heard announcing that the Norwich Pharmaceutical Company, makers of Pepto Bismol and other fine products, is proud to sponsor Dashiell Hammett's most exciting character, "The Fat Man," live from New York. Hammett had nothing to do with selecting Jack Smart for the part of Brad Runyon. But it is not hard to understand how Jack landed it. He was a natural as Brad Runyon. Not that he was a detective buff. Quite the contrary. He never read detective stories or went to see detective movies. In fact, because he only read as a soporific, he found dusters more to his liking. No, he was a cinch for the part because, as he would often say, "it takes a fat man to sound like a fat man." And Jack was indeed a fat man. Where Brad Runyon weighed-in at a relatively svelte 237 pounds (or 239 pounds, or 241 pounds, depending on which episode you listened to), Jack himself tipped the scales at around 270 pounds, which, considering it was distributed over a 5- foot, 9-inch frame, meant that he measured up to the part with plenty to spare. Brad Runyon's quick wit was in fact Jack's own and is evident when one listens to the episodes. When jibed by a "baddy" on one program about his weight, the Fat Man snarls back, "the only difference between you and me, Rudolph, is that my fat is from the neck down." Jack was active in assembling the final script, revising the plot, cutting material he didn't like, and even helping select supporting cast." In fact he had it written into his contract that he would receive a copy of a script two weeks before it was to air so that he could blue-line and change lines before it was finalized. This was an important factor in the quality of the series, for there were several writers over the years and those were the days before there were "continuity" people whose job it was to make sure that scripts did not contradict one another. Jack performed this continuity function very well. The show never lost its popularity, and by the end of the series J. Scott Smart had become a household name.

DATE: Thu, 12 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.71 MB
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Screen Guild Theater - Yankee Doodle Dandy (10-19-42)

Yankee Doodle Dandy (Aired October 19, 1942) The Screen Guild Theater was a popular radio anthology series during the Golden Age of Radio broadcast from 1939 until 1952 with leading Hollywood actors performing in adaptations of popular motion pictures such as Going My Way and The Postman Always Rings Twice. The show had a long run, lasting for 14 seasons and 527 episodes. It initially was heard on CBS from January 8, 1939 until June 28, 1948, continuing on NBC from October 7, 1948 until June 29, 1950. It was broadcast on ABC from September 7, 1950 to May 31, 1951 and returned to CBS on March 13, 1952. It aired under several different titles: The Gulf Screen Guild Show, The Gulf Screen Guild Theater, The Lady Esther Screen Guild Theater and The Camel Screen Guild Theater. THIS EPISODE: Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 American biographical musical film about George M. Cohan (pronounced "Coe-Han"), the actor / singer / dancer / playwright / songwriter / producer / theatre owner / director / choreographer known as "The Man Who Owns Broadway",[1] starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston and Richard Whorf, and featuring Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney. The movie was written by Robert Buckner and Edmund Joseph, and directed by Michael Curtiz. According to the special edition DVD, significant and uncredited improvements were made to the script by the famous "script doctors" twin brothers Julius J. Epstein and Philip G. Epstein. The song "The Yankee Doodle Boy" (a.k.a. "Yankee Doodle Dandy") was Cohan's trademark piece, a patriotic pastiche drawing from the lyrics and melody of the old Revolutionary War number, "Yankee Doodle". Other Cohan tunes in the movie include "Give My Regards to Broadway", "Harrigan", "Mary's a Grand Old Name", "You're a Grand Old Flag" and "Over There". Cagney was a fitting choice for the role, as a fellow Irish-American who had been a song-and-dance man himself early in his career. His unique and seemingly odd presentation style, of half-singing and half-reciting the songs, reflected the style that Cohan himself used. His natural dance style and physique were also a good match for Cohan. Newspapers at the time reported that Cagney intended to consciously imitate Cohan's song-and-dance style, but to play the normal part of the acting in his own style. Although director Curtiz was famous for being a taskmaster, he also gave his actors some latitude. Cagney and other players improvised a number of "bits of business," as Cagney called them. Although a number of the biographical particulars of the movie are Hollywood-ized fiction (omitting the fact that Cohan divorced and remarried, for example, and taking some liberties with the chronology of Cohan's life), care was taken to make the sets, costumes and dance steps match the original stage presentations. This effort was aided significantly by a former associate of Cohan's, Jack Boyle, who knew the original productions well. Boyle also appeared in the film in some of the dancing groups. The movie poster for this film was the first ever produced by noted poster designer Bill Gold. This movie also has an injoke about movies-when Cohan "retires" in the 1930's and several teenagers-who know nothing about his career-ask him if he had ever been in the movies, he remarks that he had been in an actor in the "legitimate theater"!

DATE: Thu, 12 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.75 MB
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The Blue Beetle - Jewel Mystery Of Channel Island (09-11-40)

Jewel Mystery Of Channel Island (Aired September 11, 1940) The original Golden Age Blue Beetle was Dan Garret, son of a police officer killed by a criminal. This Fox Feature Syndicate version of the character debuted in Mystery Men Comics #1 (Aug. 1939), and began appearing in his own 60-issue series shortly thereafter. Rookie patrolman Dan Garret originally fought crime as the Blue Beetle without the benefit of superhuman abilities. Garret later donned a bulletproof costume (described by Garret as being made of a chain-mail which was "as thin and light as silk"), and temporarily gained superhuman strength from ingesting the mysterious vitamin 2-X. The supporting cast remained fairly stable throughout this original run, and included Joan Mason, a crime reporter for the Daily Blade who would ultimately star in her own backup stories, and Mike Mannigan, Dan's stereotypically Irish partner on the force. Dr. Franz, a local pharmacist and inventor of the bulletproof suit and 2-X formula, played a large role in the first few issues, but eventually faded from the cast. The Beetle also had a kid sidekick in the form of Sparkington J. Northrup, a.k.a. Sparky, who originally wore a simplified version of Blue's costume, but later went into action wearing his regular clothes. A popular character of the era, he had his own short-lived comic strip, drawn by a pseudonymous Jack Kirby and others, and a radio serial that ran for 48 thirteen-minute episodes. When superheroes fell out of vogue in the late 1940s, Fox downplayed the Beetle's superheroic aspects (his superhuman abilities were removed) and eventually relegated him to a host for true crime stories before the character went on hiatus. The Blue Beetle had a relatively short career on the radio, between May and September of 1940. Motion picture and radio actor Frank Lovejoy was the Blue Beetle for the first 13 episodes, while for the rest of the shows, the voice was provided by a different, uncredited actor. The Blue Beetle was a young police officer who saw the need for extra-ordinary crime fighting. He took the task on himself by secretly donning a superhero costume to create fear in the criminals who were to learn to fear the Blue Beetle's wrath. The 13-minute segments were usually only two-parters, so the stories were often more simple than other popular programs, such as the many-parted Superman radio show.

DATE: Thu, 12 Aug 2010
SIZE: 7.74 MB
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Raleigh Cigarette Program Starring Red Skelton - Food Prices (04-21-42)

Food Prices (Aired April 21, 1942) Red Skelton was drafted in March 1944, and the popular series was discontinued June 6, 1944. Shipped overseas to serve with an Army entertainment unit as a private, Red Skelton had a nervous breakdown in Italy, spent three months in a hospital and was discharged in September, 1945. He once joked about his military career, "I was the only celebrity who went in and came out a private." On December 4, 1945, The Raleigh Cigarette Program resumed where it left off with Red Skelton introducing some new characters, including Bolivar Shagnasty and J. Newton Numbskull. Lurene Tuttle and Verna Felton appeared as Junior's mother and grandmother. David Forrester and David Rose led the orchestra, featuring vocalist Anita Ellis. The announcers were Pat McGeehan and Rod O'Connor. The series ended May 20, 1949 and Red moved to CBS to continue his radio career. In 1951 (the same year the network introduced I Love Lucy), CBS beckoned Red Skelton to bring his radio show to television. His characters worked even better on screen than on radio; television also provoked him to create his second best-remembered character, Freddie the Freeloader, a traditional tramp whose appearance suggested the elder brother of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus clown Emmett Kelly. Annoucer/voice actor Art Gilmore who voiced numerous movie trailers in Hollywood in the 1950s became the annoucer on the show with David Rose and his orchestra providing the music. Red Skelton's weekly signoff -- "Good night and may God bless" -- became as familiar to television viewers as Edward R. Murrow's "Good night and good luck." Red Skelton was the first CBS television host to begin taping his weekly programs in color, in the early 1960s, after he bought an old movie studio and converted it for television productions. THIS EPISODE: April 21, 1942. "Food Prices" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Raleigh Cigarettes, Sir Walter Raleigh Pipe Tobaco. The first tune is, "How About You?" Red's opening monologue is about food prices. Red sketches are about animals. "Deadeye" and his horse rob a bank. Clem Kadiddlehopper is looking for his lost pig. Junior, "The Mean Widdle Kid," has a new doggie. Red Skelton, Ozzie Nelson and His Orchestra, Truman Bradley (announcer), Harriet Hilliard, Wonderful Smith, Del King (commercial spokesman). 29:21.

DATE: Wed, 11 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.61 MB
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Men From The Ministry - The Great Footwear Scandal (10-29-62)

The Great Footwear Scandal (Aired October 29, 1962) The Men from the Ministry was a British radio comedy series broadcast by the BBC between 1962 and 1977, starring Wilfrid Hyde-White, Richard Murdoch and, from 1966, when he replaced Hyde-White, Deryck Guyler. Written and produced by Edward Taylor with contributions from John Graham, and with some early episodes written by Johnnie Mortimer and Brian Cooke, it ran for 14 series, totalling 147 half-hour episodes. A further 14 episodes were made by BBC Transcription Service in 1980 but never broadcast in the UK. Versions were made by YLE in Finland, Sveriges Radio (SR) in Sweden, and Springbok Radio in South Africa, where it was made into a feature-length film. The series was about lazy, bungling, incompetent civil servants, "Number One" - Roland Hamilton-Jones (Wilfrid Hyde-White) and later Deryck Lennox-Brown (Deryck Guyler), "Number Two" - Richard Lamb (Richard Murdoch), with their dim, typo-prone, teenage secretary, Mildred Murfin (Norma Ronald), all watched-over by the lecherous, pompous, self-seeking Permanent undersecretary Sir Gregory Pitkin (Roy Dotrice and later Ronald Baddiley), all members of the British Civil Service based in Whitehall. The stories centered on their General Assistance Department (analogous to the "Department of Administrative Affairs" in the later Yes Minister), which helps other governmental departments. Instead of assistance, the department creates mix-ups, misunderstandings and cock-ups that lead to a telling-off from Sir Gregory, who sees his 'hard earned' Civil Service career and pension disappearing.

DATE: Wed, 11 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.95 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone" - The Homesteaders (03-23-58)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone" - The Homesteaders (Aired March 23, 1958) CBS started the year 1958 off with the introduction on January 1, 1958 of Frontier Gentleman. That series lasted 41 broadcasts. Near the end of the year, the network launched Have Gun, Will Travel on November 11, 1958, which continued for 106 programs. In between, a very short series was offered and discontinued after only 16 broadcasts, Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone. Sam Buffington starred as Luke Slaughter, a Civil War cavalryman who turned to cattle ranching in post war Arizona territory near Fort Huachuca. William N. Robson, known from his work with such series as Escape, Suspense and The CBS Radio Workshop, directed. Sam Buffington enacted the title role on Luke Slaughter of Tombstone, another of CBS's prestigious adult Westerns. The series was produced and directed by William N. Robson, one of radio's greatest dramatic directors and Robert Stanley producer was aired from February 23 through June 15, 1958. Buffington portrayed the hard-boiled cattleman with scripts overseen by Gunsmoke sound effects artist (and sometimes scriptwriter) Tom Hanley. Each program had an authoritative opening statement: "Slaughter's my name, Luke Slaughter. Cattle's my business. It's a tough business, it's a big business. I got a big stake in it. And there's no man west of the Rio Grande big enough to take it away from me." Junius Matthews was heard as Slaughter's sidekick, Wichita. In his first adventure, tough-as-nails westerner Luke Slaughter guarantees he will bring a cattle herd to Tombstone despite the threats of rustlers and a spy among the ranks of his cowboys. Like the other CBS radio westerns, Have Gun, Will Travel or Frontier Gentleman, this one had plenty of action, the productions were well done and well acted. Luke Slaugher was cut short, like a lot of other radio shows, by the steady pressure from TV. THIS EPISODE: March 23, 1958. "The Homesteaders" - CBS network. Sustaining. Colonel Everett arrives in Tombstone with a Spanish land grant to the Meeker ranch, signed by General Santa Ana himself! Amerigo Moreno (music supervisor), William Quinn, Don Clark (director), Edwin Jerome, James McCallion, John McIntire, Sam Buffington, Tom Hanley (sound patterns), Wilbur Hatch (music), William N. Robson (director). 24:42.

DATE: Wed, 11 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.79 MB
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Mr. Keen Tracer Of Lost - Yellow Talon Murder Case (09-22-49)

Yellow Talon Murder Case (Aired September 22, 1949) Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons was one of radio's longest running shows, airing (October 12, 1937 to April 19, 1955), continuing well into the television era. It was produced by Frank and Anne Hummert. The sponsors included Whitehall Pharmacal (as in Anacin, Kolynos Toothpaste, BiSoDol antacid mints, Hill's cold tablets and Heet liniment), Dentyne, Aerowax, RCA Victor and Chesterfield cigarettes. It aired on the NBC Blue network until 1947, when it switched to CBS. Bennett Kilpack began as Mr. Keen in 1937 with Phil Clarke stepping into the role late in the series. For 18 years the kindly Keen and his faithful assistant, Mike Clancy (Jim Kelly), entertained followers with their intuitive perception that kept listeners coming back for more. With 1690 nationwide broadcasts, Mr. Keen was the most resilient private detective in a namesake role. The nearest competitors were Nick Carter, Master Detective (726 broadcasts), The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (657) and The Adventures of the Falcon (473). However, only 59 of those 1690 Mr. Keen programs are known to exist. Richard Leonard directed scripts by Barbara Bates, Stedman Coles, Frank Hummert, Lawrence Klee and Bob Shaw. James Fleming and Larry Elliott were the announcers. Al Rickey's band provided the background music, including the program's theme, "Someday I'll Find You." The cliches, stereotypes and simplistic dialogue provided much fodder for Bob and Ray's memorable parody, Mr. Trace, Keener Than Most Persons, broadcast in numerous variations. It was also satirized by Harvey Kurtzman and Jack Davis in Mad's fifth issue (June-July 1953) as "Kane Keen!" The character of Mr. Keen was referenced by Alfred Hitchcock in one of his television shows, according to The Alfred Hitchcock Presents Companion by Patrik Wikstrom and Martin Grams, Jr. Mr. Keen is also mentioned in the stage version of Bye Bye Birdie by the character Mr. Harry MacAfee, who was played by Paul Lynde. THIS EPISODE: September 22, 1949. CBS network. "The Yellow Talon Murder Case". Sponsored by: Anacin, Kolynos, Heet, Kriptin, Bisodol, Hills Cold Tabs. Murder stalks a large estate along the Hudson River, fifty miles north of the city (Croton?). The killer is apparently a bird of enormous size. Frank Hummert, Anne Hummert (author), Bennett Kilpack. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Tue, 10 Aug 2010
SIZE: 7.07 MB
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The Abbott & Costello Show - Murder At The Radio Quiz Show (12-30-48)

Murder At The Radio Quiz Show (Aired December 30, 1948) As the country eased into the 1950's, Abbott & Costello tackled a new medium: television. Comedy historians have glossed over their contribution, but in fact, Bud and Lou became early television pioneers along with the likes of Phil Silvers, Milton Berle, Jack Benny, and Lucille Ball & Desi Arnaz. The Abbott & Costello Showdebuted in 1952, running for two seasons on CBS. Today, the show is seeing a revival with the 1993 and 1994 episode video releases from Shanachie Entertainment and in a 1994 Columbia House infomercial. To further display their burlesque wares on the live stage, which was always home to the boys, NBC welcomed Abbott & Costello to its new hour-long live variety show The Colgate Comedy Hour as guest hosts. Debuting on January 7, 1951, Bud and Lou boosted the show's ratings with their presentations of the Abbott & Costello staple routines, including "Who's On First." In 1956, one year before the release of their last film together, "Dance With Me Henry," and their official (and amicable) split, Bud and Lou were brought together on The Steve Allen Show before a live nationwide viewing audience. The emotion was further heightened when, unbeknownst to both men, Steve Allen announced the induction of Abbott & Costello and their Gold Record of "Who's On First" into the world-famous Baseball Hall Of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. (Many are not aware that Abbott & Costello are the first non-baseball-playing celebrities ever to be inducted into the Hall of Fame!) Lou Costello passed away in 1959, and Bud Abbott in 1974 - but today, their comedy continues to generate new legions of fans around the world. Their clean style of comedy, born on the burlesque stage over 50 years ago, continues to find a ready and accepting audience in today's marketplace. In 1991, the United States Postal Service paid homage to the team by enlisting them as part of their "Comedy Legends" commemorative stamp booklet.

DATE: Tue, 10 Aug 2010
SIZE: 10.8 MB
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The Day Of The Triffids [Part 1 of 2] 1957

The Day Of The Triffids [Part 1 of 2] 1957 The Day of the Triffids is a 6 part radio show based on a 1951 novel by John Wyndham. The show was produced for the BBC by Peter Watts and stars Patrick Barr as Bill Mason, Monica Gray as Josella Playton and Gabriel Blunt as Susan. The Day of the Triffids as reproduced for the BBC in 1968 by John Powell starred Gary Watson and Barbara Sheney. A B grade movie was also made of the book in 1962. Although the movie was bad the radio adaptation of the book is very good. Gabriel Blunt does a poor job of portraying a young Susan while the other actors do a very good job with their roles. The story takes place in England and begins with Bill Mason recounting what has happened since the triffids first began appearing. The triffids are carnivorous plants which were originally bred to produce a natural oil that would take over the fish oil market. During breeding the triffids some how gained a low level of intelligence. This intelligence allows them to seek out their own sources of food; which includes humans. The triffids attack their prey with a front which is capable of killing a human. Once their prey is dead the triffid feeds on its rotting flesh. Triffids are also kept in gardens and zoos around the world but their poisonous fronds are removed for protection. Bill Mason works in a triffid oil production plant and is temporarily blinded when attacked by a triffid. He is sent to a hospital where his eyes are bandaged while they heal. During the night a terrific meteor shower takes place and is visible to just about everyone on the planet. Those who witness the meteor shower are permanently blinded by it. Bill and others who did not view the shower must learn to cope in a world which is predominantly blind. With no one to tend the triffids many begin escaping and their numbers multiply rapidly. Those people who are blind begin to capture the sighted to use as their eyes as they forage for food and supplies. Society collapses as disease and triffids begin to spread. The Day of the Triffids centers more around what the question of what types of societies the various communities of people will establish than it does around the triffids themselves. (Show Notes From the OTRR group) The novel was adapted to radio (readings) by the BBC as early as 1953. BBC radio series followed in 1957 and 1968 (Giles Cooper). The same year it was adopted in Germany by Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR) Köln (Cologne), translated by Hein Bruehl and most recently re-broadcast as a four episode series on WDR5 in January 2008. Further BBC radio productions followed in 1971, 1973 and 1980. In 2001 writer Lance Dann adapted the series in two hour long episodes for the BBC World Service.

DATE: Tue, 10 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.63 MB
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Blair Of The Mounties - 2 Episodes (01-31-38) and (02-07-38)

2 Ep. "Fire Valley" (Aired January 31, 1938) and "Murder In Long Cooley" (Aired February 7, 1938) and Blair of the Mounties is the story of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police -- a fictional series based on the work of the Northwest Mounted Police before the World War I. It was a fifteen minute weekly serial heard every Monday for 36 weeks beginning January 31st, 1938 and running through the 3rd of October of 1938. It may have been on the air as early as 1935, although there’s no actual proof of this. Little is known of the series other than it followed the exploits of Sgt. Blair of the Northwest Mounted Police. and probably was the inspiration for Trendell, Campbell and Muir's Challenge of the Yukon. The series was written by Colonel Rhys Davies, who also played the Colonel Blair in the series. Jack Abbot played the Constable. Jack French, one of OTR’s best researchers says this about the series: “Blair is not restricted to Canada, as other Mounties, as we find him, in a few cases, in Great Britain, solving cases. Overall the series is amateurishly written, with the actor playing Blair coming accros as a bit stuffy.” TODAY'S SHOW: "Fire Valley" and "Murder In Long Cooley" January 31, 1938. Program #1. Walter Biddick syndication. "Fire Valley". Corporal Lesley has been, "stolen away by Ghosts." . 12:37. February 7, 1938. Program #2. Walter Biddick syndication. "Murder In Long Cooley". Belle La Tour is on the trail to Fort MacAllister...during a blizzard. . 12:00.

DATE: Tue, 10 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.79 MB
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Rocky Jordan - The Map Of Murder (07-03-49)

The Map Of Murder (Aired July 3, 1949) Rocky Jordan was a radio series about an American restaurateur in Cairo who each week became involved in some kind of mystery or adventure. The show was broadcast on CBS from October 31st 1948 to September 10th 1950. and then again from June 27th 1951 to August 22nd 1951. The character of Rocky Jordan had been introduced to listeners in a similar show called A Man Named Jordan that was broadcast in 1945 but set in Istanbul rather than Cairo. The two lead roles were those of Rocky Jordan and Captain Sam Sabaaya of the Cairo Police. For most of the show's history Jordan was played by veteran radio actor Jack Moyles, but he was replaced by a movie star, George Raft, for the brief 1951 run. Jay Novello played Sabaaya throughout the entire series. Other roles were played by members of Hollywood's Radio Row, and the announcer was Larry Thor. Rocky Jordan (Jack Moyles/George Raft) is the proprietor of the Café Tambourine located, according to the announcer, "not far from the Mosque Sultan Hassan," though he is originally from St. Louis. As an American restaurateur in a North African country, Jordan is somewhat similar to the Rick Blaine character in the film Casablanca, though the Café Tambourine is apparently a much less salubrious venue than Rick's Bar. The announcer describes it as being "Crowded with forgotten men, and alive with the babble of many languages". Each episode sees Jordan confronted with a "crime, a mystery, a beautiful woman, or a combination of the three". Precisely why Jordan is in Egypt is left deliberately vague, though he apparently has enemies in St. Louis so can't go back home. THIS EPISODE: July 3, 1949. CBS Pacific network. "The Map Of Murder". Sustaining. A new singer in The Cafe Tambourine gets into an argument with a customer, and is found dead in a hotel room shortly thereafter. An important map and $5000 have disappeared! Jack Moyles, Larry Thor (announcer), Byron Kane, Jay Novello, Cliff Howell (producer, director), Larry Roman (story editor), Gomer Cool (story editor), John Michael Hayes (writer), Richard Aurandt (music). 29:40.

DATE: Mon, 09 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.92 MB
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The Adventures Of The Falcon - The Case Of The Sweet Swindle (06-13-51)

The Case Of The Sweet Swindle (Aired June 13, 1951) The Falcon radio series premiered on the American Blue Network in April 1943 and continued on the air till around September 1952. The introduction to the show began with "The Adventures of the Falcon." Then continuing with a ringing phone call to the Falcon, also known as Michael Waring, from a woman in which her voice is never heard. He would reply to her and another adventure would follow. Waring was snappy and sarcastic with the incompetent police who were inevitably unable to solve the mysteries without his help. Like the films, the radio plots mixed danger, romance and comedy in equal parts. About 70 episodes where created. The Falcon had many voices acting his part, beginning with Barry Kroeger. James Meighan later became the voice of the Falcon followed by Les Tremayne, George Petrie, and Les Damon. THIS EPISODE: June 13, 1951. NBC network. "The Case Of The Sweet Swindle". Sponsored by: Kraft Miracle Whip. Those people who think they can get away with murder are in for the "shock" of their lives! Les Damon, Ed Herlihy (announcer), Drexel Drake (creator), Bernard L. Schubert (producer), Richard Lewis (director), Eugene Wang (writer), Arlo (music), Florence Halop. 31:14.

DATE: Mon, 09 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.12 MB
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Damon Runyon Theater - All Horse Players Die Broke (05-08-49)

All Horse Players Die Broke (05-08-49) The Damon Runyon Theater was a 52 show series that was syndicated across the USA beginning in early 1949. Damon Runyon was a gifted sports writer in New York City as well as being a great journalist and great short story writer. His stories were humorous ones, written in the "dem" and "dose" vernacular of the city's loveable and not so loveable characters of Broadway, the prize ring and the underworld. His most famous collection of short stories, Guys and Dolls, was on Broadway and later made into a movie. Many of his stories were filmed including Sorrowful Jones, A Pocketful of Miracles, Lady for a Day, Blue Plate Special, The Lemon Drop Kid (twice) and Little Miss Marker (four times). In addition to this The Damon Runyon Theater was syndicated for television in the mid 1950s. THIS EPISODE: May 8, 1949. Program #19. Mayfair syndication. "All Horse Players Die Broke". Commercials added locally. A good story about Lady Luck. John Brown, Damon Runyon (author), Russell Hughes (adaptor), Vern Carstensen (production supervisor), Richard Sanville (director). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Mon, 09 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.14 MB
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Father Brown Mysteries - The Arrow Of Heaven (10-12-86)

The Arrow Of Heaven (Aired October 12, 1986) Father Brown's abilities are also considerably shaped by his experience as a priest and confessor. In "The Blue Cross", when asked by Flambeau, who has been masquerading as a priest, how he knew of all sorts of criminal "horrors," he responds: "Has it never struck you that a man who does next to nothing but hear men's real sins is not likely to be wholly unaware of human evil?" He also states a reason why he knew Flambeau was not a priest: "You attacked reason. It's bad theology." And indeed, the stories normally contain a rational explanation of who the murderer was and how Brown worked it out. Despite his devotion, or perhaps, because of it, Father Brown always emphasizes rationality: some stories, such as "The Miracle of Moon Crescent", "The Oracle of the Dog", "The Blast of the Book" and "The Dagger With Wings", poke fun at initially skeptical characters who become convinced of a supernatural explanation for some strange occurrence, while Father Brown easily sees the perfectly ordinary, natural explanation. In fact, he seems to represent an ideal of a devout, yet considerably educated and "civilised" clergyman. This can be traced to the influence of neo-scholastic thought on Chesterton. Father Brown is characteristically humble, and is usually rather quiet, but when he does talk, he almost always says something profound. Although he tends to handle crimes with a steady, realistic approach, he believes in the supernatural as the greatest reason of all. Father Brown was the perfect vehicle for conveying Chesterton's view of the world and, of all of his characters, is perhaps closest to Chesterton's own point of view, or at least the effect of his point of view. Father Brown solves his crimes through a strict reasoning process more concerned with spiritual and philosophic truths rather than scientific details, making him an almost equal counterbalance with Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, whose stories Chesterton read and admired. However, the Father Brown series commenced before Chesterton's own conversion to Catholicism.

DATE: Sun, 08 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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Pat Novak For Hire - Geranium Plant (05-14-49)

Geranium Plant (Aired May 14, 1949) Pat Novak for Hire was an old-time radio detective show which aired from 1946-1947 as a West Coast regional program and in 1949 as a nationwide program for ABC. The regional version originally starred Jack Webb in the title role, with scripts by his roommate Richard L. Breen. When Webb and Breen moved from San Francisco to Los Angeles to work on an extremely similar nationwide series, Johnny Modero, for the Mutual network, Webb was replaced by Ben Morris and Breen by other writers. In the later network version, Jack Webb resumed the Novak role, and Breen his duties as scriptwriter. The series is popular among fans for its fast-paced, hard-boiled dialogue and action and witty one-liners. Pat Novak for Hire is set on the San Francisco, California waterfront and depicts the city as a dark, rough place where the main goal is survival. Pat Novak is not a detective by trade. He owns a boat shop on Pier 19 where he rents out boats and does odd jobs to make money. Each episode of the program, particularly the Jack Webb episodes, follows the same basic formula; a foghorn sounds and Novak's footsteps are heard walking down the pier. He then pauses and begins with the line "Sure, I'm Pat Novak . . . for hire". The foghorn repeats and leads to the intro theme, during which Pat gives a monologue about the waterfront and his job renting boats. Jack Webb narrates the story as well as acts in it, as the titular character. Playing the cynic, he throws off lines such as "...about as smart as teaching a cooking class to a group of cannibals". He then introduces the trouble in which he finds himself this week. Typically, a person unknown to Pat asks him to do an unusual or risky job. Pat reluctantly accepts and finds himself in hot water in the form of an unexplained dead body. Police Inspector Hellman (played by Raymond Burr) arrives on the scene and pins the murder on Novak. With only circumstantial evidence to go on, Hellman promises to haul Novak in the next day for the crime. The rapid, staccato dialogue between Webb & Burr is typical of harboiled fiction and is often humorous. Pat uses the time to try to solve the case. He usually employs the help of his friend Jocko Madigan (played by Tudor Owen) - a drunken ex-doctor typically found at some disreputable tavern or bar - to help him solve the case. As Pat asks for his help, Jocko launches a long-winded philosophical diatribe, full of witty and funny remarks, until Novak cuts him off. Jocko and Pat unravel the case and Hellman makes the arrest. Finally, we hear the foghorn and Novak's footsteps on the pier again before Novak spells out the details of the case for us. At the end, Novak informs us that "Hellman asked only one question", which Pat answers with a clever retort. The dialogue is rife with similes found in pulp fiction. Example: 'The neighborhood was run down - the kind of place where the For Rent signs look like ransom notes. THIS EPISODE: May 14, 1949. "Geranium Plant" - Program #11. ABC net origination, AFRS rebroadcast. Patsy gets $50 for delivering a potted geranium, and an epidemic of the double-cross. Jack Webb, William P. Rousseau (producer), Tudor Owen, Basil Adlam (composer, conductor), Raymond Burr. 30:02.

DATE: Sun, 08 Aug 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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Richard Diamond Private Detective - Wrong Laundry Number (09-06-50)

Wrong Laundry Number (Aired September 6, 1950) In 1945, Dick Powell portrayed Phillip Marlowe in the movie "Murder My Sweet" based on Raymond Chandler's novel "Farewell My Lovely". This was a radical departure in character for Mr. Powell from a Hollywood song and dance man to a hard-boiled detective. On June 11,1945, the Lux Radio Theater brought "Murder My Sweet" to radio, again with Dick Powell in the lead. These two performances prompted his selection for the part of Richard Rogue, in Rogue’s Gallery after his role for Lux Radio Theater and Richard Diamond came four years later. Richard Diamond, Private Detective came to NBC in 1949. Diamond was a slick, sophisticated detective, with a sharp tongue for folks who needed it. Diamond enjoyed the detective life, but not as much as entertaining his girl, Helen Asher. Diamond's counterpart on the police force was Lt. Levinson who often accepted Diamond's help reluctantly. Although they always seem at odds with each other, Diamond and Levinson were best friends. For all his bravado, Diamond had a serious case of vertigo. Helen Asher was portrayed by Virginia Gregg, who also played the part of Brooksie on Let George Do It and Betty Lewis on Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar. Blake Edwards wrote the early shows and also directed a few. Music was composed by David Baskerville and later by Frank Wirth. In January of 1951, the series moved to ABC under the full sponsorship of Camel cigarettes. Then in May of 1953, the series moved to CBS but all shows were repeats from the 1950-51 Rexall sponsored season on NBC. Richard Diamond was one of the radio shows which successfully moved to television with David Janssen, later of The Fugitive fame, in the title role of Richard Diamond. The opening scene of the television show often featured the long lovely legs of Mary Tyler Moore, who went on to fame in The Dick Van Dyke Show and The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Mary was replaced on the Richard Diamond show when it became known that she owned the mystery legs. Show Notes From OTRR Group THIS EPISODE: September 6, 1950. "Wrong Laundry Number" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Rexall. Diamond gets the wrong bundle of laundry and washes a killer out of hiding! Dick Powell does not sing after the case. Dick Powell, Blake Edwards (writer), Frank Worth (composer, conductor), Stacy Harris, Jaime del Valle (transcriber), Bill Forman (announcer), Virginia Gregg, Ted de Corsia, Wilms Herbert, Clayton Post, Sidney Miller. 29:19.

DATE: Sun, 08 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.03 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "The Roy Rogers Show" - Range War (11-06-52)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "The Roy Rogers Show" - Range War (Aired November 6, 1952) Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were well known as advocates for adoption and as founders and operators of children's charities. They adopted several children. Both were outspoken Christians. In Apple Valley, California, where they made their home, numerous streets and highways as well as civic buildings have been named after them in recognition of their efforts on behalf of homeless and handicapped children. Roy was an active Freemason and a Shriner, and was noted for his support of their charities. Roy and Dale's famous theme song, "Happy Trails", was written by Dale and they sang as a duet to sign off their television show.In the fall of 1962, the couple co-hosted a comedy-western-variety program, The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show, aired on ABC. It was canceled after three months, losing in the ratings to The Jackie Gleason Show on CBS. He also made numerous cameo or guest appearances on other popular television shows, starring as himself or other cowboy-type characters, such as in "The Bushwackers" a season one episode of Wonder Woman. Rogers also owned a Hollywood production company which handled his own series. It also filmed other undertakings, including the 1955-1956 CBS western series Brave Eagle starring Keith Larsen as a young peaceful Cheyenne chief, Kim Winona as Morning Star, his romantic interest, and the Hopi Indian Anthony Numkena as Keena, Brave Eagle's foster son. THIS EPISODE: November 6, 1952. "Range War" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Post Cereals (pop-out trading cards premium). It looks like a range war is about to break out between the ranchers and the nesters. Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Pat Brady, Frank Hemingway, Herb Butterfield, Joe Bradley, Charles Seel, Parley Baer, Bill Green, Tom Hargis (director), Ray Wilson (writer), Art Rush (producer), Art Ballinger (announcer), Milton Charles (music). 24:33.

DATE: Sun, 08 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.55 MB
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Dad's Army - Time On My Hands (02-18-75)

Time On My Hands (Aired February 18, 1975) In May 1940, Sir Anthony Eden makes his historic speech calling for men under and over the age of active service in the armed forces to form a local defence corps. In Walmington, the Local Bank manager George Mainwaring set's up the town's Local Defence Volunteers,with the assistance of his Bank Clerk, Arthur Wilson and the Local Butcher, Jack Jones. The LDV later become known as the Home Guard or affectionately (to the TV audience) "Dad's Army" as the platoon mainly consist of Old Soldiers.From week to week they would become entangled in many exploits while defending Walmington from a possible invasion and any interference from the Local Air Raid Warden. Although a comedy series, "Dad's Army" probably depicted more of an accurate version of the Home Guard than anyone could actually realise. Initially it was felt the series was maybe mocking England's finest hour and its first episodes were reviewed with great criticism. However, Jimmy Perry , David Croft and the cast felt that the show had many strengths and so did the steady flow of the British public which began following the Walmington-On-Sea platoon's exploits on Television each week. In 1969, "Dad's Army" embarked on its first Colour TV series, and with that success followed. A feature length film based on the series was made by Columbia Pictures in 1971, and a stage show based on the series toured the UK between 1975 - 76. The programme was also adapted for BBC Radio. Most of the cast are now no longer with us, but their memory lives on through regular repeats on BBC Television and UK Gold as well as many video and DVD releases. THIS EPISODE: February 18, 1975. "Time On My Hands" - A German Pilot's parachute becomes entangled on the Town Hall Clock, as the Platoon move in, they become marooned in the Clock Tower when the scaffolding leading to it collapses... Will they ever free the German Pilot before he falls from the clock? Cast: Arthur Lowe (Captain Mainwaring), John Le Mesurier (Sergeant Wilson), Clive Dunn (Lance Corporal Jones), John Laurie (Private Frazer), Arnold Ridley (Private Godfrey), Ian Lavender (Private Pike), Larry Martyn (Private Walker), Bill Pertwee (Chief Warden Hodges) Frank Williams (The Vicar), Erik Chitty (Mr. Parsons), Fraser Kerr (The German Pilot) and John Snagge (BBC Announcer)

DATE: Sat, 07 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.92 MB
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The Hall Of Fantasy - The Temple Of Huizilipochle (06-29-53)

The Temple Of Huizilipochle (Aired June 29, 1953) There were four series under the Hall Of Fantasy banner, all produced by Richard Thorne. The first Hall Of Fantasy originated from radio station KALL in Salt Lake City, Utah. Richard Thorne and Carl Greyson were announcers for the station and produced the rather barebones shows, possibly late in 1946 and into 1947. The series consisted of 26 shows. Broadcast dates for the shows are not known. The shows were written or adapted by Robert Olson and directed by Mr. Thorne. Most were classic murder mysteries with traditional endings; the evil-doer got his just rewards. The series was sponsored by the Granite Furniture Company, although existing shows are missing the commercials, apparently because they were inserted live. THIS EPISODE: June 29, 1953. "The Temple Of Huizilipochle" - Mutual network, WGN, Chicago origination (possibly syndicated). "The Temple Of Huitzilipochle". Commercials added locally. Two explorers face a tribe of savages in the Brazilian jungle. Richard Thorne (writer). 23:33.

DATE: Sat, 07 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.78 MB
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Your's Truly Johnny Dollar - The Johnson Payroll Matter (09-21-58)

The Johnson Payroll Matter (09-21-58) The guest stars and supporting casts were always first rate, attracting the best radio actors in both Los Angeles and New York. Pat McCracken was played by several actors – most frequently, by Larry Dobkin. Particularly noteworthy was the work of Virginia Gregg, who played many roles, including Johnny's girlfriend Betty Lewis. Harry Bartell was also a frequent guest, who did many of the Spanish dialect roles when Johnny went to a Latin American country. Other frequent guest performers were Parley Baer, Tony Barrett, John Dehner, Don Diamond, Sam Edwards, Herb Ellis, Frank Gerstle, Stacy Harris, Jack Kruschen, Forrest Lewis, Howard McNear, Marvin Miller, Jeanette Nolan, Vic Perrin, Barney Phillips, Jean Tatum, Russell Thomson, Ben Wright, and Will Wright. Vincent Price co-starred as himself in "The Price of Fame Matter" and went to Europe with Johnny on the case. In December 1960, the show moved to New York. Robert Readick started the New York run as Dollar, but only lasted a short while. Jack Johnstone continued to write for the show and submitted scripts from California. Johnstone wrote about 350 Johnny Dollar scripts under his own name and his pen names Sam Dawson and Jonathan Bundy. Johnstone wrote the last episodes of both Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar and Suspense. He used the Bundy pen name when writing the last Suspense episode, "Devilstone". THIS EPISODE: September 21, 1958. CBS net origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Johnson Payroll Matter". Johnny's asked to take a relaxing trip to Southern California and pickup $100,000...and bring it back. Part of the system cue has been deleted. Bob Bailey, Virginia Gregg, Forrest Lewis, Shepard Menken, Lawrence Dobkin, Frank Gerstle, Jack Johnstone (producer, director), Robert Stanley (writer), Roy Rowan (announcer). 20:24.

DATE: Sat, 07 Aug 2010
SIZE: 3.91 MB
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The American Trail - Dispatch From New York (02-10-53)

Dispatch From New York (Aired February 10, 1953) From Louis and Clarke to the great ol' California Gold Rush, America has had the great fortune of experiencing a plethora of awesome triumphs of the human spirit. Just gazing upon good Old Glory, one could just feel the patriotism, hard work and sacrifice that early Americans experienced in order to lay the foundation for their future children and for a Nation that will forever been known as the "Land of Opportunity." The American Trail tells the story of these brave men and women. This 13 part serial chronicles the beautiful history of the United States of America and tells of the lives that made the citizens of that great Nation look up at that Red, White, and Blue and say "You're a grand old flag, You're a high flying flag/ And forever in peace may you wave." ("You're a Grand Old Flag" by George M. Cohan. THIS EPISODE: February 10, 1953. Program #1. The Ladies' Auxiliary of The Veterans of Foreign Wars syndication. "Dispatch To New York". Fictitious reporter Tom Farnell writes the story of the adoption of the Constitution. . 17:33.

DATE: Sat, 07 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.99 MB
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Murder At Midnight - Ace Of Death (10-12-46)

Ace Of Death (Aired October 12, 1946) The Murder at Midnight series was a thirty-minute broadcast featuring tales of the supernatural. The actors included Mercedes McCambridge and Lawson Zerbe and the show was narrated using the spooky, creepy voice of Raymond Morgan and always opened using the same gripping signature; “the witching hour, when night is darkest, our fears are the strongest, our strength at its lowest ebb… Midnight! … when graves gape open and death strikes!”. The show was produced in New York and was first heard in syndication between September 16, 1946 and September 8, 1947 on WJZ (now WABC). The show's writers included Robert Newman, Joseph Ruscoll, Max Erlich and William Norwood, and it was directed by Anton M. Leder. The host was Raymond Morgan, who delivered the memorable lines of introduction over Charles Paul's effective organ theme. CAST: Elspeth Eric, Mercedes McCambridge, Berry Kroeger, Betty Caine, Carl Frank, Barry Hopkins, Lawson Zerbe, Charlotte Holland - NARRATORS: Raymond Morgan - MUSIC: Charles Paul - PRODUCERS/DIRECTORS: Lewis G Cowan, Anton M Leader -WRITERS: Robert Newman, Joseph Ruscoll, Max Ehrlich, William Morwood. THIS EPISODE: October 12, 1946. Program #17. Syndicated. "The Ace Of Death". Commercials added locally. A story based on the classic story "The Suicide Club," by Robert Louis Stevenson. Well done! Albert Buhrman (music), Anton M. Leader (director), John Griggs, Karl Swenson, Max Ehrlich (writer), Robert Louis Stevenson (author), Louis G. Cowan (producer). 27:27.

DATE: Fri, 06 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.67 MB
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The Adventures Of Nero Wolf - The Case Of The Deadly Sellout (01-05-51)

The Case Of The Deadly Sellout (Aired January 5, 1951) Nero Wolf is a fictional detective created by American author Rex Stout in the 1930s and featured in dozens of novels and novellas.In the stories, Wolfe is one of the most famous private detectives in the United States. He weighs about 285 pounds and is 5'11" tall. He raises orchids in a rooftop greenhouse in his New York City brownstone on West 35th Street, helped by his live-in gardener Theodore Horstmann. Wolf drinks beer throughout the day and is a gourmand. He employs a live-in chef, Fritz Brenner. He is multilingual and brilliant, though apparently self-educated, and reading is his third passion after food and orchids. He works in an office in his house and almost never leaves home, even to pursue the detective work that finances his expensive lifestyle. Instead, his leg work is done by another live-in employee, Archie Goodwin. While both Wolf and Goodwin are licensed detectives, Goodwin is more of the classic fictional gumshoe, tough, wise-cracking, and skirt-chasing. He tells the stories in a breezy first-person narrative that is semi-hard-boiled in style. THIS EPISODE: January 5, 1951. NBC network. "The Case Of The Deadly Sellout". Sustaining. A prize fighter has disappeared, but Archie soon finds his dead body. A blackmailing dame is shot in Archie's arms. Rex Stout (creator), Edwin Fadiman (producer), Lawrence Dobkin, Sydney Greenstreet, Gerald Mohr, Don Diamond, Anne Diamond, Eddie Fields, Don Stanley (announcer), Charlotte Lawrence, J. Donald Wilson (producer, director). 29:27.

DATE: Fri, 06 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.74 MB
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Arch Oboler's Plays - Strange Morning (04-05-45)

Strange Morning (Aired April 5, 1945) Oboler sold his first radio scripts while still in high school during the 1920s and rose to fame when he began scripting the NBC horror anthology Lights Out in 1936. He later found notoriety with his script contribution to the 12 December 1937 edition of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. In Oboler's sketch, host Don Ameche and guest Mae West portrayed a slightly bawdy Adam and Eve, satirizing the Biblical tale of the Garden of Eden. On the surface, the sketch did not feature much more than West's customary suggestive double-entendres, and today it seems quite tame. But in 1937, that sketch and a subsequent routine featuring West trading suggestive quips with Edgar Bergen's dummy Charlie McCarthy helped the broadcast cause a furor that resulted in West being banned from broadcasting and from being mentioned at all on NBC programming for 15 years. The timing may have been a contributing factor, according to radio historian Gerald S. Nachman in Raised on Radio: "The sketch resulted in letters from outraged listeners and decency groups... What upset churchgoing listeners wasn't the Biblical parody so much as the fact that it had the bad luck to air on a Sunday show." When Oboler took over Lights Out in 1936, the show was already a sensation because of creator Wyllis Cooper's violent, quirky scripts, and Oboler continued in a similar vein, announcing during the opening of each episode: "This is Arch Oboler bringing you another of our series of stories of the unusual, and once again we caution you: These Lights Out stories are definitely not for the timid soul. So we tell you calmly and very sincerely, if you frighten easily, turn off your radio now." THIS EPISODE: April 5, 1945. Mutual network. "Strange Morning". Sustaining. An excellent drama about a nurse who tells a ward filled with wounded soldiers that Germany has surrendered. The program name and date above are subject to correction. Possibly the first show of the series. Ingrid Bergman, Arch Oboler (writer, director), Gordon Jenkins (music). 25:03.

DATE: Fri, 06 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.53 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Fort Laramie" - Stage Coach Stop (04-15-56)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Fort Laramie" - Stage Coach Stop (Aired April 15, 1956) Fort Laramie had one of the strongest supporting casts in radio history: John Dehner, Sam Edwards, Virginia Gregg, Barney Phillips, Larry Dobkin, Ben Wright, Jeanette Nolan, and Harry Bartell. Most of them were also working regularly on Gunsmoke. And while Bill Conrad ("Matt Dillon") and Georgia Ellis ("Miss Kitty") never got to Fort Laramie, Parley Baer ("Chester") and Howard McNear ("Doc Adams") did. They both had major roles in the 7-29-56 production entitled "Nature Boy" and McNear had a reoccurring role as "Pliny" the sutler. Later, to create a foursome of major cast members, Macdonnell introduced "Lt. Seiberts" in episode #7, which aired 3-4-56 and he gave the role to Harry Bartell. This show, "The Shavetail", was based upon the nickname that enlisted men in the U.S. Cavalry in the 1800s gave to new officers fresh out of West Point. The term originated from a custom of shaving or docking the tail of an untrained horse so the troopers would be wary of such a mount. Bartell, who in 1956 was 42 years of age, and older than both Perrin and Burr, related to me recently that he had doubts about being able to project the voice of a young, junior officer. However anyone who has heard Bartell in this role will be convinced his fears were groundless. His voice clearly portrays that of a youthful, inexperienced but earnest college graduate. For the next thirty three episodes, the expanded regular cast would consist of four characters: "Major Daggett", (Moyles), "Capt. Quince" (Burr), "Lt. Seiberts" (Bartell) and "Sgt. Goerss" (Perrin). While there were many other officers, enlisted men, scouts, and civilians in Fort Laramie, most of the actors who played them were present for only one or two separate episodes. THIS EPISODE: April 15, 1956. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "Stage Coach Stop". Mrs. Kleinhexel and her giggly daughter visit the post during the fort's ball, while Yellow Horse may break out of the stockade. The program was recorded March 22, 1956. Amerigo Moreno (music supervisor), Bill James (sound patterns), Eleanor Tannen, Frank Cady, Harry Bartell, Howard McNear, Jack Kruschen, Jack Moyles, Jeanette Nolan, Kathleen Hite (writer), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), Ray Kemper (sound patterns), Raymond Burr, Sam Edwards, Shirley Mitchell (?), Vic Perrin. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Fri, 06 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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The Great Gildersleeve - Number Of Beans Contest (06-18-52)

Number Of Beans Contest (Aired June 18, 1952) Premiering on NBC on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGee's Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, in Fibber, Gildersleeve occasionally speaks of his wife; his change to a bachelor is something of a discontinuity. He even states on occasion that he has never been married. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Firefly). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. THIS EPISIODE: June 18, 1952. "Guess The Number Of Beans Contest" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Kraft Miracle Whip, Kraft Miracle Sandwich Spread. Guess how many beans are in the jar and win a lamp from Peavy's drugstore. This is a network, sponsored version. Andy White (writer), Bud Hiestand (announcer), Earle Ross, Jack Meakin (music), John Elliotte (writer), Lillian Randolph, Marylee Robb, Richard LeGrand, Walter Tetley, Willard Waterman. 29:25.

DATE: Thu, 05 Aug 2010
SIZE: 7.34 MB
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David Harding Counterspy - Arrogant Arsonist (09-06-49)

Arrogant Arsonist (Aired September 6, 1949) David Harding Counterspy was an espionage drama radio series that aired on ABC and Mutual from May 18, 1942 to November 29, 1957. David Harding (Don MacLaughlin) was the chief of the United States Counterspies, a unit engaged during World War II in counterespionage against Japan's Black Dragon and Germany's Gestapo. With spies still lurking in the post-war years, the adventures continued apace well after World War II ended. The early plots on Counterspy were counterespionage against Germany's Gestapo and Japan's Black Dragon while WWII plots focused on more generic counter-espionage plots like those of I was a Communist for the FBI, This is Your FBI and FBI in Peace and War. The show was so popular that it inspired two feature films in 1950 titled, David Harding, Counterspy" and "Counterspy Meets Scotland Yard". THIS EPISODE: September 6, 1949. ABC network. "The Case Of The Arrogant Arsonist". Sponsored by: Pepsi Cola. The counterspies are forced to act as, "Cupids in reverse." The system cue has been deleted. Don MacLaughlin, Mandel Kramer, Phillips H. Lord (producer), Jesse Crawford (organ), Leonard L. Bass (director), Edward Adamson (writer). 29:07.

DATE: Thu, 05 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.64 MB
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The Mysterious Traveler - The Man Who Vanished (07-06-48)

The Man Who Vanished (Aired July 6, 1948) The Mysterious Traveler was an anthology radio series, a magazine and a comic book. All three featured stories which ran the gamut from fantasy and science fiction to straight crime dramas of mystery and suspense. Written and directed by Robert Arthur and David Kogan, the radio series was sponsored by Adams Hats. It began on the Mutual Broadcasting System, December 5, 1943, continuing in many different timeslots until September 16, 1952. The lonely sound of a distant locomotive heralded the arrival of the malevolent narrator (portrayed by Maurice Tarplin), who introduced himself each week in the following manner: "This is the Mysterious Traveler, inviting you to join me on another journey into the strange and terrifying. I hope you will enjoy the trip, that it will thrill you a little and chill you a little. So settle back, get a good grip on your nerves and be comfortable -- if you can!" Cast members included Jackson Beck, Lon Clark, Roger DeKoven, Elspeth Eric, Wendell Holmes, Bill Johnstone, Joseph Julian, Jan Miner, Santos Ortega, Bryna Raeburn, Frank Readick, Luis van Rooten, Ann Shepherd, Lawson Zerbe and Bill Zuckert. Sound effects were by Jack Amrhein, Jim Goode, Ron Harper, Walt McDonough and Al Schaffer. "Behind the Locked Door," a popular, much-requested episode which took place in total darkness, was repeated several times during the years. Two archaeologists discover a century-old wagon train that had been sealed in a cave following a landslide. When their Native American guide is mysteriously and brutally attacked, the two, now lost in the darkness, conclude that the descendants of the wagon train are still living in the cave. The popularity of the series spawned other supernatural shows, such as The Sealed Book. With scripts by a Mysterious Traveler writer and Tarplin as host-narrator, The Strange Dr. Weird was a nearly identical program. THIS EPISODE: July 6, 1948. Mutual network. "The Man Who Vanished". Sustaining. An albino discovers the secret of invisibility, and promptly commits a murder. Wendell Holmes, Roger De Koven, Art Carney, Maurice Tarplin, Richard Coogan, Paul Taubman (music), Carl Caruso (announcer), Hal Reed (sound), Al King (broadcast engineer), Robert A. Arthur (writer, producer, director), David Kogan (writer, producer, director). 29:36.

DATE: Thu, 05 Aug 2010
SIZE: 14.0 MB
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Box 13 - 2 Episodes From 1949 (05-22-49) and (06-19-49)

"Death Is No Joke" (05-22-49) and "Killer At Large (06-19-49) The premise of the program was that Dan Holiday was an author who wrote mystery novels. To get ideas for his novels he placed an advertisement in a newspaper saying "Adventure wanted, will go anywhere, do anything, Box 13." The ads always brought fun adventures of all kinds: from racketeer's victim to psychotic killer looking for fun. Most of the episodes were based on Dan Holiday replying to a letter he received at Box 13. He would generally solve a mystery in the process, and return to his office in time to enjoy a hearty laugh at the expense of Suzy, his amusingly stupid secretary. He would certainly not meet the strictest requirements for private eyes (not licensed, collected no fees from clients), but the definition should stretch to sneak him in under the rope. In total there were 52 episodes of this radio program created. It was heard over the Mutual Broadcasting System as well as being syndicated. The series was produced by Mayfair Productions. Box 13, starring Alan Ladd as Dan Holiday. Sylvia Picker played Suzy, Dan Holiday's secretary and Edmond MacDonald as Lt. Kling. Other stars in the series were Betty Lou Gerson, Lurene Tuttle, Alan Reed, Luis Van Rooten, John Beal and Frank Lovejoy. Music was by Rudy Schrager and the writer was Russell Hughes. Announcer/Director was Vern Carstensen. The series was produced by Richard Sanville with Alan Ladd as co-producer. Show Notes From The OTRR Group TODAY'S SHOW: May 22, 1949. Program #40. Mutual network origination, Mayfair syndication. "Death Is No Joke". Commercials added locally. A series of practical jokes threatens the life of an heir. Alan Ladd, Oran Blackstone (writer), Richard Sanville (director), Rudy Schrager (composer, conductor), Sylvia Picker, Vern Carstensen (production supervisor), Joseph Kearns. 26:37. June 19, 1949. Program #44. Mutual network origination, Mayfair syndication. "Killer At Large". Commercials added locally. A man offers Holiday $50,000 to kill him, then changes his mind. Alan Ladd, Ed Begley, Frank Lovejoy, Richard Sanville (director), Rudy Schrager (composer, conductor), Russell Hughes (writer), Sylvia Picker, Vern Carstensen (production supervisor). 26:44.

DATE: Wed, 04 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.86 MB
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The Martin & Lewis Show - John Garfield (05-22-49)

John Garfield (Aired May 22, 1949) An NBC radio series commenced in 1949; it lasted until 1953. On October 3, 1948, the team made their television debut on the NBC live television variety show Welcome Aboard sponsored by Admiral, manufacturers of TV sets. In 1949, Martin and Lewis were signed by Paramount producer Hal Wallis as comedy relief for the film My Friend Irma. Martin was thrilled to be out of New York City, a place he had developed a lifelong hatred for. He liked the fact that California, because of its earthquakes, had few tall buildings. Suffering as he did from claustrophobia, Martin almost never used elevators, and having to climb multiple flights of stairs in Manhattan's skyscrapers was not his idea of fun. Their agent, Abby Greshler, negotiated for them one of Hollywood's best deals: although they received only a modest $75,000 between them for their films with Wallis, Martin and Lewis were free to do one outside film a year, which they would co-produce through their own York Productions: their first starring feature was the independently-produced At War with the Army (1950). They also had complete control of their club, records, radio and television appearances, and it was through these endeavors that Martin and Lewis earned millions of dollars. They made regular appearances on NBC's Colgate Comedy Hour during the 1950s. Although there had been a number of hugely successful film teams before, Martin and Lewis were a new kind of team. The fun they had together set them apart from everything else being done at the time. Both were talented entertainers, but the fact that they were such good friends on and off stage took their act to a new level. Martin and Lewis were the hottest act in America during the early '50s, but the pace and the pressure took their toll. Dean usually had the thankless job of the straight man, and his singing had yet to develop into his unique style of his later years. The critics praised Lewis, and while they admitted that Martin was the best partner he could have, most of them claimed that Lewis was the real talent of the team and could succeed with anyone. It is worth noting that Lewis always praised his partner, and while he appreciated the attention he was getting, he has always said with complete conviction that the act would never have worked without Martin. In the book Dean & Me Lewis calls Martin one of the great comic geniuses of all time. THIS EPISODE: May 22, 1949. "Guest Is John Garfield" - NBC network. Sustaining. A rehearsal recording with piano accompaniment only. Dean's first tune is, "I Can't Give You Anything But Love." Dean takes Jerry down to the gym to build his muscles and toughen him up. Guest John Garfield goes a few rounds with Jerry. Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Flo McMichaels, John Garfield, Robert L. Redd (producer, director), Dick McKnight (writer), Ray Allen (writer), Roger Price (writer), Wayne Howell (announcer). 29:28.

DATE: Wed, 04 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.65 MB
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The Clock - Dr. Carters Experiment (02-23-47)

Dr. Carters Experiment (Aired February 23, 1947) The Clock, is an Australian radio show, a dramatic thirty-minute suspense and mystery series. It was written by Lawrence Klee and narrated by "The Clock." First Broadcast in the United States was in November, 1946. It was syndicated by Grace Gibson syndication. At the time of production, the Australian accent, we now know and love, originating from the Irish and Cockney accents, was rather frowned upon by non other than Australians. The shows tried to sound neutral, then there was hope that the show could be sold to Great Britain and the United States. The show was bought by the ABC network in the States, although the ABC on the CD label (below) stands for the Australian Broadcast Company. The settings were usually generic and the actors tried to speak without a perceptible accent and for that reason the program sounded sort of "American". They occasionally slipped up on a few words, using 'boot' instead of 'trunk' when referring to a car. At the end of the fifteen month series run it continued for another 13 weeks but now with an All-American cast with new scripts and the entire crew including the cast, directors, musicians, etc., Americans. The series aired beyond this 13 week time period because some time after May 1948 there are at least three circulating "The Clock" programs from late 1948. There is some confusion as to whether the American version originated from New York and then moved to Los Angeles, or just broadcast from Los Angeles for the complete American run.

DATE: Wed, 04 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.89 MB
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My Favorite Husband - Liz Has Her Fortune Told (09-10-48)

Liz Has Her Fortune Told (Aired September 10, 1948) My Favorite Husband is the name of an American radio program and network television series. The original radio show, co-starring Lucille Ball, was the initial basis for what evolved into the groundbreaking TV sitcom I Love Lucy. The series was based on the 1940 novel Mr. and Mrs. Cugat, written by Isabel Scott Rorick, which had previously been adapted into the 1942 Paramount feature film Are Husbands Necessary?, co-starring Ray Milland and Betty Field. My Favorite Husband began on CBS Radio with Lucille Ball and Richard Denning as Liz and George Cugat. After a few early episodes, confusion with bandleader Xavier Cugat prompted a name change to Liz and George Cooper. The cheerful couple lived at 321 Bundy Drive in the fictitious city of Sheridan Falls and were billed as "two people who live together and like it." The main sponsor was General Foods' Jell-O, and an average of three "plugs" for Jell-O were made in each episode, including Lucille Ball's usual sign-on, "Jell-O, everybody!" The program, which aired 124 episodes from July 23, 1948 through March 31, 1951, initially portrayed the couple as being a well-to-do banker and his socially prominent wife, but three new writers — Bob Carroll, Jr., Madelyn Pugh and Jess Oppenheimer — took over the writing, changed the couple's name to Cooper and remade them into a middle-class couple, which they thought average listeners would find more accessible. Lucille Ball was asked to do a television version of the show (with Jell-O remaining as sponsor), and CBS insisted on Richard Denning continuing as her co-star. However, Ball refused to do a husband-and-wife TV show without real-life husband Desi Arnaz playing her on-screen husband. The network reluctantly agreed, reworking the concept into I Love Lucy after Ball and Arnaz took a show on the road to convince the network that audiences would respond. When Jell-O dropped out of the show, Philip Morris became the television sponsor. Carroll, Pugh and Oppenheimer agreed to do the switch to I Love Lucy. They subsequently reworked several My Favorite Husband episodes into I Love Lucy episodes, especially early in the TV show's run. For example, the 1948 radio episode entitled "Giveaway Program" inspired the I Love Lucy episode "Redecorating," with some lines exactly the same. Many actors who had done the My Favorite Husband radio show also appeared on I Love Lucy, sometimes in episodes where they reprised their roles using a reworked My Favorite Husband script.

DATE: Wed, 04 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.69 MB
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Fibber McGee & Molly - Late Car Payment (10-21-47)

Late Car Payment (Aired October 21, 1947) Marian and Jim Jordan assumed the classic roles of Fibber McGee and Molly in the Merchandise Mart studios from the time of the show's inception in the spring of 1935 until their move to Southern California in the early months of 1939. The Jordans made their Chicago radio debut on WIBO and later moved on to WENR and WMAQ when the station was still owned by the Chicago Daily News. When NBC purchased WMAQ late 1931, the Jordans moved over to the Merchandise Mart where, next to Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll, they became the network's hottest Chicago properties. "Smackout" (which you can listen to) was their first hit. But "Marian and Jim" (as they were known in their early days) also popped up on any number of variety shows (including "The Breakfast Club") NBC pumped to the net or ran locally. THIS EPISODE: October 21, 1947. "Late Car Payment" - NBC network, WMAQ, Chicago aircheck. Sponsored by: Johnson's Wax. Fibber's missed a car payment, which requires a visit to Carl Snarl at the Wistful Vista Finance Company. The King's Men, Jim Jordan, Marian Jordan, Billy Mills and His Orchestra, Harlow Wilcox, Don Quinn (writer), Phil Leslie (writer), Gale Gordon, Bill Thompson. 29:43.

DATE: Tue, 03 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.52 MB
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Tom Corbett Space Cadet - Atmosphere Of Death (Part 2 of 2) 03-20-52

Atmosphere Of Death (Part 2 of 2) Aired March 20, 1952 Tom's career covered every media outlet of the 1950's, except the movies. There were eight hardback books published by Grosset and Dunlap from 1952 to 1956, fourteen comics published by Dell & Prize comics from 1952 to 1955, a daily and Sunday newspaper strip written by Paul S. Newman and drawn by Ray Bailey from September 1951 to September 1953 , a six month run of radio shows in 1952 and the TV series from Oct 1950 to 1956. The TV series began on CBS (October 2, 1950 - December 29, 1950 ), then moved to ABC from January 1, 1951 to September 26, 1952. While on ABC, there were repeats on NBC (as a summer replacement for Victor Borge) from July 1951 to September 1951 . Then, after Kelloggs canceled the series, it returned on alternate Saturdays for one season on the DuMont network from August 29, 1953 to May 22, 1954. The last season, for Kraft, ran on NBC from December 11, 1954 to June 25, 1955. The show was broadcast in a Monday, Wed and Friday format with 30 minute shows on Saturday. THIS EPISODE: March 20, 1952. ABC netWORK, WJZ, New York aircheck. "The Atmosphere Of Death" Part 2 of 2". Sponsored by: Kellogg's Pep, Kellogg's Raisin Bran. The cadets discover a plot to take over the government of Venus. Al Markim, Drex Hines (director), Edward Bryce, Frank Thomas Jr., Jackson Beck (announcer), Jan Merlin, Jon Gart (organist). 25 minutes.

DATE: Tue, 03 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.60 MB
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Suspense - The Mystery Of Marie Roget (02-07-60)

The Mystery Of Marie Roget (Aired February 7, 1960) Suspense was one of the premier programs of the Golden Age of Radio (aka old-time radio), and advertised itself as "radio's outstanding theater of thrills." It was heard in one form or another from 1942 through 1962. There were approximately 945 episodes broadcast during its long run, over 900 of which are extant in mostly high-quality recordings. Suspense went through several major phases, characterized by different hosts, sponsors and director/producers. There were a few rules which were followed for all but a handful of episodes: Protagonists were usually a normal person suddenly dropped into a threatening or bizarre situation. Evildoers must be punished in the end. THIS EPISODE: February 7, 1960. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Mystery Of Marie Roget". Who killed the beautiful French girl? Mr. Poe knew...and predicted the solution to a real killing in a work of fiction. The story was previously produced on "Suspense" on December 14, 1953. Edgar Allan Poe (author), Jackson Beck, Robert Dryden, Guy Repp, Abby Lewis, Ethel Everett, Jim Boles, Stuart Metz (announcer), George Walsh (announcer), E. Jack Neuman (adaptor), Paul Roberts (producer, director), Ethel Huber (music supervisor). 25 minutes.

DATE: Tue, 03 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.93 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "All Star Western Theater" - Alan Lane At Sundown (10-27-46)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "All Star Western Theater" - Alan Lane At Sundown (Aired October 27, 1946) All Star Western Theater is an enjoyable series filled with the humor of guest stars such as Johnny Mack Brown and Smiley Burnett and in the tried and true format of The Roy Rogers Show. The words honest, sincere and un-assuming come to mind. Done live, All Star Western Theater gives the studio audience a good show, and the result is still a happy ride down memory lane. Riding out of the sunny back lots of Hollywood, All Star Western Theatre delivered Republic Western-style entertainment with chuck wagon sized doses of fine music, broad humor and guest appearances by the best of the West. The music was provided by the Riders of the Purple Sage, fronted by Foy Willing, with the help of Kenny Driver, Al Sloey and Johnny Paul. The group appeared on various shows on radio, including the Andrews Sisters' Eight-to-the-Bar Ranch in '44-'45, and the Roy Rogers Show during the 1946 - 48 period. Western swing was big in those days, and this show has some really fine renditions in that great American music style. Guest stars such as Johnny Mack Brown and Smiley Burnett come on, and do action sketches and real knee-slapping humor skits. When these cowboys rustle up humor, they play it about as broad as the western skies themselves. Laughs this simple are not heard much anymore, unless you have an eight-year old with an old jokebook. But that doesn't mean All Star Western Theater isn't enjoyable. It really is, in the same way that the old western movies are enjoyable. Honest, sincere and un-assuming come to mind. THIS EPISODE: October 27, 1946. CBS Pacific network, KNX, Los Angeles aircheck. "Alan Lane At Sundown". Sponsored by: Weber's Bread. A shoot-out on Main Street has a strange ending when the gunshot sound effects fail to go off! Alan Rocky Lane, Foy Willing and The Riders Of The Purple Sage, Cottonseed Clark (announcer). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Tue, 03 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.66 MB
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The Globe Theater - The Distant Future (10-17-44)

The Distant Future (Aired October 17, 1944) The Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS) incorporated some thirty-plus exemplars from the This Is My Best canon into their own Frontline Theatre/Globe Theater syndicated transcriptions for service people overseas. For the Globe Theater run, Jimmy Wallington, Herbert Marshall, Jack Tierny and William Johnstone alternated as hosts of the denatured This Is My Best productions under the Globe Theater series designated H-5, the fifth such series to enter the growing number of AFRS offerings sent to American and Allied troops throughout World War II, and further, until the AFRS was folded into the Armed Forces Radio and Televistion Service in the 1949-1950 timeframe. It's also worth noting that the denatured This Is My Best productions that were selected for the Globe Theater run contain completely different introductions and closing comments from the various hosts for the Globe Theater. Thankfully, the AFRS Globe Theater exemplars from the This Is My Best commercially broadcast productions now comprise almost a third of the representative exemplars of This Is My Best. There are undoubtedly at least fifteen to twenty more This Is My Best exemplars among the Globe Theater transcriptions yet to be found and digitally encoded for circulation. We're also convinced that as many as twenty to thirty more commercial transcriptions or 'from-Air' recordings of This Is My Best may yet entire circulation as well. The combination of the yet to be rediscovered Globe Theater exemplars and commercial recordings of This Is My Best may one day restore as much as sixty to seventy-five percent of the orginal This Is My Best canon. THIS EPISODE: October 17, 1944. Program #146. AFRS. "The Distant Future". Stories of how man will live in the future at the north pole and in outer space. Hans Conried, Lon McCallister, Lurene Tuttle. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Mon, 02 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.53 MB
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Tom Corbett Space Cadet - Atmosphere Of Death (Part 1 of 2) 03-18-52

Atmosphere Of Death (Part 1 of 2) Aired March 18, 1952 Tom Corbett is the main character in a series of Tom Corbett — Space Cadet stories that were depicted in television, radio, books, comic books, comic strips, coloring books, punch-out books and View-Master reels in the 1950s. The stories followed the adventures of Tom Corbett, Astro, and Roger Manning, cadets at the Space Academy as they train to become members of the elite Solar Guard. The action takes place at the Academy in classrooms and bunkroom, aboard their training ship the rocket cruiser Polaris, and on alien worlds, both within our solar system and in orbit around nearby stars. The Tom Corbett universe partook of pseudo-science, not equal to the standards of accuracy set by John W. Campbell in the pages of Astounding. And yet, by the standards of the day, it was much more accurate than most media science fiction. Mars was a desert, Venus a jungle, and the asteroids a haunt of space pirates, but at least planets circled suns and there was no air in space. Contrast this with Twilight Zone, years later, where people could live on asteroids wearing ordinary clothes, or Lost in Space, years after that, where a spaceship could be passing "Jupiter and Andromeda" at the same time. Before Star Trek, Tom Corbett — Space Cadet was the most scientifically accurate series on television, in part due to official science advisor Willy Ley, and later due to Frankie Thomas. Thomas read up on science and everyone on the set turned to him for advice on matters scientific. THIS EPISODE: March 18, 1952. ABC netWORK, WJZ, New York aircheck. "The Atmosphere Of Death" (Part 1 of 2). Sponsored by: Kellogg's Pep, Kellogg's Raisin Bran. Murder and mayhem take place aboard a space liner. Al Markim, Drex Hines (director), Edward Bryce, Frank Thomas Jr., Jackson Beck (announcer), Jan Merlin, Jon Gart (organist). 25 minutes.

DATE: Mon, 02 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.76 MB
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Dangerous Assignment - File 307 (08-20-49)

File 307 (Aired August 20, 1949) Dangerous Assignment stands as one of the most durable programs of its genre and era in the waning days of The Golden Age of Radio. Espionage or foreign intrigue dramas weren't particularly groundbreaking undertakings by the 1950s. Bulldog Drummond was the first of the more successful exemplars of Radio espionage and intrigue, running from 1941 to 1954, most often under the lead of the gifted character actor, George Coulouris. The Counterspy series had been well underway since 1942 and ran in one incarnation or another through 1954. The Man Called X had already aired--to great popular and critical acclaim--for almost five years prior to 1949. Indeed, within a year of airing Dangerous Assignment's Summer 1949 season, The Man Called X returned to the air for another two years. For one of those years, Dangerous Assignment and The Man Called X ran back to back in the NBC line-up. THIS EPISODE: August 20, 1949. Program #7. NBC network. Sustaining. Steve Mitchell is sent to Zurich to recover "File 307". Who is the mysterious "Bruner?" Brian Donlevy, Robert Ryf (writer), Bruce Ashley (music), Bill Cairn (director). 29:24.

DATE: Mon, 02 Aug 2010
SIZE: 6.72 MB
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The Diary Of Fate - Joe Mattock (03-16-48)

Joe Mattock (Aired March 16, 1948) The twist with Diary of Fate was the total absence of pretense. The program jumps right to the 'source' of Man's ultimate destiny--Fate itself--in the form of the Guardian of the Diary of Fate. It is within the Diary of Fate, that every soul's fate is painstakingly chronicled by book and page number--or so we're very persuasively given to understand. Fate itself--in this instance, at least--is the great character actor Herbert Lytton, providing the forboding vocal gravitas we might expect from such an all-powerful cosmic force. Produced from Hollywood, the entire production was voiced by primarily west coast actors. Famous Radio and Television promoter Larry Finley produced and syndicated the program to at least some 94 affiliate stations throughout the U.S., Canada and Jamaica. Most local or regional broadcasts were either sustained offerings by an independent affiliate, or were sponsored by spot advertisers ranging over a wide variety of offerings or services. The production didn't stint on talent, as hinted above. No less than Ivan Ditmars provided the music direction and in addition to Herb Lytton as 'Fate', the varying casts included Lurene Tuttle, Larry Dobkin, Hal Sawyer, Gloria Blondell, Frank Albertson, Jerry Hausner, Howard McNear, Peter Leeds, Ken Peters, Daws Butler and William Johnstone. All in all a superb well of talent from which to draw each week. While a bit difficult to document, the production remains quite collectable and the perspective of the presentation is also unique for the era--or since for that matter. Diary of Fate is one of Radio's little, oft-overlooked gems that demand pulling out, polishing up for better enjoyment, then dutifully returning them to their preserve for another airing one day in the future. THIS EPISODE: March 16, 1948. Program #14. Finley syndication. "Joe Mattock". Commercials added locally. Book 63, page 397. A truck driver and his beautiful hitch-hiker commit murder to get their hands on $100,000, kept in a little black bag. The date is subject to correction. Ivan Ditmars (music), Larry Finley (producer), Hal Sawyer, Frank Albertson, Gloria Blondell, Herb Lytton, Jerry Hausner, Ray Ehrlenborn (probable sound effects). 26:47.

DATE: Sun, 01 Aug 2010
SIZE: 9.70 MB
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Agatha Christie Presents Miss Marple - A Mirror Cracked From Side To Side (Part 2 of 2)

A Mirror Cracked From Side To Side (Part 2 of 2) 1953 Miss Marple is able to solve difficult crimes not only because of her shrewd intelligence, but because St. Mary Mead, over her lifetime, has given her seemingly infinite examples of the negative side of human nature. No crime can arise without reminding Miss Marple of some parallel incident in the history of her time. Miss Marple's acquaintances are sometimes bored by her frequent analogies to people and events from St. Mary Mead, but these analogies often lead Miss Marple to a deeper realization about the true nature of a crime. Although she looks like a sweet, frail old woman, Miss Marple is not afraid of dead bodies and is not easily intimidated. She also has a remarkable ability to latch onto a casual comment and connect it to the case at hand. Miss Marple has never worked for her living and is of independent means, although she benefits in her old age from the financial support of Raymond West, her nephew (A Caribbean Mystery,1964). She demonstrates a remarkably thorough education, including some art courses that involved study of human anatomy through the study of human cadavers. In They Do It with Mirrors (1952), it is revealed that, in her distant youth, Miss Marple spent time in Europe at a finishing school. She is not herself from the aristocracy or landed gentry, but is quite at home amongst them; Miss Marple would probably have been happy to describe herself as a gentlewoman. Miss Marple may thus be considered a female version of that staple of British detective fiction, the gentleman detective. This education, history, and background are hinted at in the Margaret Rutherford films (see below), in which Miss Marple mentions her awards at marksmanship, fencing and equestrianism (although these hints are played for comedic value).

DATE: Sun, 01 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.68 MB
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Crime Does Not Pay - Horse Face (09-11-50)

Horse Face (Aired September 11, 1950) As must be immediately noticeable from the long list of movie actors heard in Crime Does Not Pay, this was not your everyday Golden Age Radio drama. Indeed, you might be forgiven if you fail to recognize more than a couple of Radio voice talents in the entire list. The Radio program was based on a very popular series of MGM Short Subjects they produced between 1935 and 1948 under the same name, Crime Does Not Pay. The Marcus Loew Booking Agency had owned radio station call sign WHN since 1946. In September of 1948, WHN changed their call sign to WMGM, in part to capitalize on a series of MGM programming projects they were attempting to introduce to a national audience. Programs such as The Adventures of Maisie, Crime Does Not Pay, MGM Theatre of The Air, and Dr. Kildare, all drew on material that MGM, as a Film Studio, already had in the can. Having established MGM Transcriptions for the express purpose of transcribing, then syndicating this content, all that remained was for them to obtain a well-established radio station from which to put their programs on the air. The assumption was that once heard in a wide enough area they'd be picked up nationwide in due time. The concept seemed to be working for several years, until a change in MGM focus made their MGM Transcriptions division redundant. WMGM slowly began changing their format to remain viable to its growing local audience, and the era of MGM-produced, network-ready, syndicated content dwindled to nothing. MGM Short Subjects had been a highly bankable asset for MGM. They also served as a 'farm club' for much of MGM's up and coming talent. Four of MGM's most popular Shorts were Our Gang, The Passing Parade, with John Nesbitt, the Oscar-winning Pete Smith Specialties, and Crime Does Not Pay. MGM made at least fifty Crime Does Not Pay short subjects. The radio series aired in New York on WMGM (October 10, 1949-October 10, 1951) and then moved to the Mutual network (January 7-December 22, 1952). Actors included Bela Lugosi, Everett Sloane, Ed Begley, John Loder and Lionel Stander. THIS EPISODE: September 11, 1950. Program #49. MGM syndication. "Horse Face". Commercials added locally. "Horse Face" plans to take over the cheap nightclub owned by "Dimes." Two cops are murdered during the dispute, but a dying cop gives a very distinctive description of the shooter. The date above is the date of the first broadcast on WMGM, New York, from which this syndicated version may have been taken. Frank Albertson, Jon Gart (composer, conductor), Marx B. Loeb (producer, director), Ira Marion (writer), Burton B. Turkas (technical advisor), Bob Williams (announcer). 26:10.

DATE: Sun, 01 Aug 2010
SIZE: 5.60 MB
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Life With Luigi - Luigi Leaves For California (01-09-53)

Luigi Leaves For California (Aired January 9, 1953) Life with Luigi was a radio comedy-drama series which began September 21, 1948 on CBS. The story concerned Italian immigrant Luigi Basco, and his experiences as an immigrant in Chicago. Many of the shows take place at the US citizenship classes that Luigi attends with other immigrants from different countries, as well as trying to fend off the repeated advances of the morbidly-obese daughter of his landlord/sponsor. Luigi was played by J. Carrol Naish, an Irish-American. Naish continued in the role on the short-lived television version in 1952, and was later replaced by Vito Scotti. With a working title of The Little Immigrant, Life with Luigi was created by Cy Howard, who earlier had created the hit radio comedy, My Friend Irma. The show was often seen as the Italian counterpart to the radio show The Goldbergs, which chronicled the experience of Jewish immigrants in New York. THIS EPISODE: January 9, 1953. "Luigi Leaves For California" - CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. Luigi plans to leave for California after Pasquale evicts him for not paying the rent. The script was previously used on "Life With Luigi" on August 28, 1949 and on September 25, 1951. Alan Reed, Cy Howard (writer, producer, director), Hans Conried, J. Carrol Naish, Joe Forte, Mary Shipp. 24:23.

DATE: Sat, 31 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.57 MB
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The Private Files Of Rex Saunders - Until Death Do Us Part (07-18-51)

Until Death Do Us Part (Aired July 18, 1951) Heard every Wednesday night at 7:30, this thriller is typical of radio mystery shows. However, it has one thing the others don't--that is a sauve Englishman by the name of Rex Harrison. Harrison turns in a better than average performance as a private detective. With the help of an assistant played by Leon Janey, the "dick" goes his way solving a new mystery each week. Impressing us most was the quiet manner in which Harrison plays his new role. Not once during the entire half hour show did he raise his voice enough to activate the decible meter on the KSMO switchboard. Most radio detectives are of the loud and fast talking type, who just love to order their girl friends and constituted police authorities around like mad. Harrison's show keeps away from this sort of thing. As a detective--gentleman or otherwise--Rex Harrison lends a distinctively intelligent and understated confidence to the role. He's not quite as nonchalant as The Thin Man's Nick Charles, not as arrogant as Philo Vance, and not as melodramatic as Sherlock Holmes or Radio's Philip Marlowe. In short, he's both 'just right' and entirely fascinating--and competent--as detective Rex Saunders. Leon Janney's rendition of Saunders' assistant, Alec, complements Harrison's delivery of his Saunders characterization. Not the typical stooge assistant, nor quite as clever as Nero Wolfe's Archie, Leon Janney's Alec is given the same latitude as some of Radio's other more helpful detective assistants. THIS EPISODE: July 18, 1951. NBC network. "Until Death Do Us Part". Sponsored by: RCA Victor. The system cue has been deleted. Leon Janney, Amzie Strickland, Himan Brown (director), Kenneth Banghart (announcer), Rex Harrison, Edward Adamson (writer). 30:00.

DATE: Sat, 31 Jul 2010
SIZE: 10.2 MB
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Agatha Christie Presents Miss Marple - A Mirror Cracked From Side To Side (Part 1 of 2)

A Mirror Cracked From Side To Side (Part 1 of 2) 1953 Jane Marple, usually referred to as Miss Marple, is a fictional character appearing in twelve of Agatha Christie's crime novels. Miss Marple is an elderly spinster who acts as an amateur detective, and lives in the village of St. Mary Mead. She is one of the most famous of Christie's characters and has been portrayed numerous times on screen. Her first published appearance was in issue 350 of The Royal Magazine for December 1927 with the first printing of the short story "The Tuesday Night Club" which later became the first chapter of The Thirteen Problems (1932). Her first appearance in a full-length novel was in The Murder at the Vicarage in 1930. Miss Jane Marple doesn’t look like your average detective. Quite frankly, she doesn’t look like a detective at all. But looks can be deceiving... For a woman who has spent her life in the small village of St Mary Mead, Miss Marple is surprisingly worldly. She has every opportunity to observe human nature – as she often points out, “There is a great deal of wickedness in village life.” In Agatha Christie's Autobiography, she states, “There was no unkindness in Miss Marple, she just did not trust people. Though she expected the worst, she often accepted people kindly in spite of what they were.“ THIS EPISODE: The Mirror Crack'd from Side to Side is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club on November 12, and in US by Dodd, Mead and Company in September 1963 under the shorter title of The Mirror Crack'd and with a copyright date of 1962. The UK edition retailed at fifteen shillings (15/-) and the US edition at $3.75. It is set in the fictional English village of St. Mary Mead and features Miss Marple. Miss Marple investigates the murder of Heather Badcock, who consumed a poisoned cocktail apparently meant for American film actress Marina Gregg, Heather's idol. As Marple investigates, she discovers dark secrets in Marina's past, secrets which also link to other seemingly innocent citizens of St. Mary Mead.

DATE: Sat, 31 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.76 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Have Gun Will Travel" - A Matter Of Ethics (02-01-59)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Have Gun Will Travel" - A Matter Of Ethics (Aired February 1, 1959) The radio series debuted November 23, 1958. Have Gun — Will Travel was created by Sam Rolfe and Herb Meadow and produced by Frank Pierson, Don Ingalls, Robert Sparks, and Julian Claman. There were 225 episodes of the TV series (several were written by Gene Roddenberry), of which 101 were directed by Andrew McLaglen and 19 were directed by the series star Richard Boone. The title was a catch phrase used in personal advertisements in newspapers like The Times, indicating that the advertiser was ready-for-anything. It was used in this way from the early 1900s. A form common in theatrical advertising was "Have tux, will travel" and this was the inspiration for the writer Herb Meadow. The TV show popularized the phrase in the sixties and many variations of it were used as titles for other works such as Have Space Suit—Will Travel by Robert Heinlein. One of the last radio shows and one of the few to go from TV to radio, HAVE GUN, WILL TRAVEL started its 106 show run on November 23, 1958. These Sunday afternoon shows were radio adaptations of the previous nights TV script with John Dehner replacing Richard Boone. Paladin, the lead character, played by John Dehner, was a man with a short temper and a fast gun. THIS EPISODE: February 1, 1959. CBS network. "A Matter Of Ethics". Sponsored by: Fitch Shampoo, Popular Science Magazine. A killer hires Paladin to keep himself from being lynched until he can stand trial. Quality upgrade, network, sponsored version. The script was used on the "Have Gun, Will Travel" television show on October 12, 1957. John Dehner, Ben Wright, Jack Edwards, Jack Kruschen, Olan Soule, Vic Perrin (doubles), Hugh Douglas (announcer), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), Sam Rolfe (creator, writer), Herb Meadow (creator), Virginia Christine, Roy Woods, John Dunkel (adaptor), Virginia Gregg, Bill James (sound effects), Tom Hanley (sound effects). 25:31.

DATE: Sat, 31 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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Escape - Mars Is Heaven (06-02-50)

Mars Is Heaven (Aired June 2, 1950) Escape was radio's leading anthology series of high adventure, airing on CBS from July 7, 1947 to September 25, 1954. Since the program did not have a regular sponsor like Suspense, it was subjected to frequent schedule shifts and lower production budgets, although Richfield Oil signed on as a sponsor for five months in 1950. Despite these problems, Escape enthralled many listeners during its seven-year run. The series' well-remembered opening combined Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain with the introduction, intoned by Paul Frees and William Conrad: “Tired of the everyday routine? Ever dream of a life of romantic adventure? Want to get away from it all? We offer you... Escape!” Of the more than 230 Escape episodes, most have survived in good condition. Many story premises, both originals and adaptations, involved a protagonist in dire life-or-death straits, and the series featured more science fiction and supernatural tales than Suspense. Some of the memorable adaptations include Algernon Blackwood's "Confession", Ray Bradbury's oft-reprinted "Mars Is Heaven," George R. Stewart's Earth Abides, Richard Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game," F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," John Collier's "Evening Primrose", later adapted to TV as a Stephen Sondheim musical starring Anthony Perkins. Vincent Price and Harry Bartell were heard in the chilling "Three Skeleton Key," the tale of three men trapped in an isolated lighthouse by thousands of rats. The half-hour was adapted from an Esquire short story by the French writer George Toudouze. THIS EPISODE: June 2, 1950. CBS network. "Mars Is Heaven". Sponsored by: Richfield Oil. An unusual treatment of the sci-fi classic. Stuart Novins opens the show on Earth with a "You Are There" type broadcast. The story was subsequently used on "Dimension X" on July 7, 1950 and January 7, 1951, on "X Minus One" on May 8, 1955 and on "Future Tense" during July, 19776. One of the "Dimension X programs was rebroadcast on "Monitor" during July, 1973. David Friedkin (adaptor), Jeff Corey, Florence Bates, William Johnstone, Walter Catlett, Paul Frees (doubles), Ray Bradbury (author), Morton Fine (adaptor), Ben Wright, William N. Robson (producer, director), Elizabeth Root, Stuart Novins, Ruth Perrott, Ben Wright, Ivan Ditmars (music), Thomas Hanlon (announcer), Ian Wolfe. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Fri, 30 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.61 MB
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The Green Lama - The Man Who Never Existed (06-05-49)

The Man Who Never Existed (Aired June 5, 1949) The Green Lama first appeared in a short novel entitled The Green Lama in the April 1940 issue of Double Detective magazine. The novel was written by Kendell Foster Crossen using the pseudonym of "Richard Foster". Writing in 1976, Crossen recalled that the character was created because the publishers of Double Detective, the Frank Munsey company, wanted a competitor for The Shadow which was published by their rivals Street & Smith. The character was originally conceived as "The Gray Lama" thinking that he could hide in the shadows and sneak around, but tests of the cover art proved to be less than satisfactory so they changed his color to green. The Green Lama proved to be successful (though not as successful as The Shadow), and Crossen continued to produce Green Lama stories for Double Detective regularly up until March 1943, for a total of 14 stories. More than three years after the demise of his comic-book, the Green Lama was resurrected for a short-lived CBS radio series in 1949, with the character's voice provided by Paul Frees. This version of the Green Lama was also written by creator Kendell Foster Crossen, along with several co-writers. CBS Television considered producing a Television version of The Green Lama for the 1950 Television season. The proposal apparently never got the green light. THIS EPISODE: June 5, 1949. CBS network. "The Man Who Never Existed". Sustaining. An archeologist's murder leads Jethro Dumont, the Green Lama, to Mexico. Paul Frees, Ben Wright, Herb Vigran, Harry Bartell. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Fri, 30 Jul 2010
SIZE: 13.7 MB
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Ford Theater - Laura (05-30-48)

Laura (Aired May 30, 1948) The Ford Theater, sponsored by the Ford Motor Company, presented hour long dramas first on NBC for one only season. The series moved to CBS for its second and last season. There were 39 NBC and 39 CBS hour- long shows (not verified). The show initially received an unfavorable review from the New York Times for poor script adaptation but was still highly rated for the actors' performance and overall production. The show was supposed to feature only original scripts but had to forgo that plan due to lack of quality material. The first season on NBC used radio actors under the direction of George Zachary. Martin Gabel announced the first show but was soon replaced by Kenneth Banghart. The second season, on CBS, used Hollywood screen actors in the lead roles, supported by radio actors. Fletcher Markle, who previously produced CBS's STUDIO ONE series, was the producer for the second season. Although a short series, it still has some of radio's best dramas. THIS EPISODE: May 30, 1948. NBC network. "Laura". Sponsored by: Mercury. The famous murder mystery with that haunting theme. A detective falls in love with a dead girl he's never met...and then suspects her of murder when she returns from the dead! Virginia Gilmore, John Larkin, Ivor Francis, Alan Hewitt, Anne Seymour, Howard Lindsay (host), Kenneth Banghart (announcer), Betty Garde, Charles Penman, Charles Mendick. 1 hour.

DATE: Fri, 30 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.54 MB
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Adventures Of The Saint - Author Of Murder (07-30-50)

Author Of Murder (Aired July 30, 1950) The Saint first came to radio in 1940, with American produced programs starting in 1945. While not the first actor to bring Templar to life over the air, it was surprisingly (at least to me) Vincent Price who played the role for the longest period, from 1947 until 1951. Knowing Price for his screen persona, it is odd at first to hear him doing this wise-cracking and lighthearted rogue. Some episodes in the Radio Spirit collection are almost slapstick, with Price being hit over the head, slapped and even thrown overboard in a single episode. It’s apparent that Price is having fun with the show, possibly as it allows him to play the handsome leading man rather than the darker heavies he was already beginning to be known for on screen. One intersting side note is that when Price left the show he was replaced by actor Tom Conway, the real life brother of George Sanders. At the time Conway had recently finished appearing in a series of films as The Falcon, a character almost identical to that being played by his brother also for RKO Studios. THIS EPISODE: July 30, 1950. NBC network. "Author Of Murder". Sustaining. Three people want Clark dead. Clark dies. Whodunnit? The killer's voice turns out to be victim's as well! Louis Vittes (writer), Vaughn Dexter (composer, conductor), Vincent Price, Leslie Charteris (creator), James L. Saphier (producer), Helen Mack (director), Don Stanley (announcer), Jeanne Bates, Lou Merrill, Fred Howard, Jack Edwards Jr., Lawrence Dobkin. 29:42.

DATE: Thu, 29 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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Father Knows Best - Rainy Day Activity (03-25-54)

Rainy Day Activity (Aired March 25, 1954) Father Knows Best, a family comedy of the 1950s, is perhaps more important for what it has come to represent than for what it actually was. In essence, the series was one of a slew of middle-class family sitcoms in which moms were moms, kids were kids, and fathers knew best. Today, many critics view it, at best, as high camp fun, and, at worst, as part of what critic David Marc once labeled the "Aryan melodramas" of the 1950s and 1960s. The brainchild of series star Robert Young, who played insurance salesman Jim Anderson, and producer Eugene B. Rodney, Father Knows Best first debuted as a radio sitcom in 1949.The series began August 25, 1949, on NBC Radio. Set in the Midwest, it starred Robert Young as General Insurance agent Jim Anderson. His wife Margaret was first portrayed by June Whitley and later by Jean Vander Pyl. The Anderson children were Betty (Rhoda Williams), Bud (Ted Donaldson) and Kathy (Norma Jean Nillson). Others in the cast were Eleanor Audley, Herb Vigran and Sam Edwards. Sponsored through most of its run by General Foods, the series was heard Thursday evenings on NBC until March 25, 1954.

DATE: Thu, 29 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.82 MB
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Academy Award Theater - The Watch On The Rhine (08-07-46)

The Watch On The Rhine (Aired August 7, 1946) The list of films and actors on Academy Award Theater is very impressive. Bette Davis begins the series in Jezebel, with Ginger Rogers following in Kitty Foyle, and then Paul Muni in The Life of Louis Pasteur. The Informer had to have Victor Mclaglen, and the Maltese Falcon, Humphrey Bogart, Sidney Greenstreet (this movie was his first major motion picutre role) plus Mary Astor for the hat trick. Suspicion starred Cary Grant with Ann Todd doing the Joan Fontaine role, Ronald Coleman in Lost Horizon, and Joan Fontaine and John Lund were in Portrait of Jenny. How Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Pinocchio were done is something to hear! Some films are less well known, such as Guest in the House, with Kirk Douglas and Anita Louise, It Happened Tomorrow, with Eddie Bracken and Ann Blythe playing Dick Powell and Linda Darnell's roles, and Cheers for Miss Bishop with Olivia de Havilland. Each adaptation is finely produced and directed by Dee Engelbach, with music composed and conducted by Leith Stevens. Frank Wilson wrote the movie adaptations. John Dunning in his book,"On the Air, The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio,"tells us why such a fine production lasted less than a year: "The House of Squibb, a drug firm, footed a stiff bill: up to $5,000 for the stars and $1,600 a week to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for use of the title. The production had all the class of a Lux or Screen Guild show…But the tariff took its toll, and after 39 weeks the series was scrapped." THIS EPISODE: August 7, 1946. CBS network. "The Watch On The Rhine". Sponsored by: Squibb. A story about a German anti-Nazi family visiting America in the years before the war. Lurene Tuttle, Paul Lukas. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Thu, 29 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.38 MB
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The Adventures Of Maisie - The Theatrical Agent (11-30-50)

The Theatrical Agent (Aired November 30, 1950) Maisie, the first in 1939, was from the book "Dark Dame" by the writer Wilson Collison,who did decades of scripting for the silver screen along with Broadway plays and magazine fiction. From the first, MGM wanted Ann Sothern to play Maisie. She began in Hollywood as an extra in 1927. "Maisie and I were just together - I just understood her," Sothern, born Harriette Arlene Lake, said after several of the films made her a star. Throughout the 1930s and '40s, Ann Sothern and Lucille Ball, like many performers in Hollywood, had not one but two careers - one in motion pictures and one on radio. MGM Studios had created the series of ten motion pictures based on a brash blonde with a heart "of spun gold." The radio show continued in the tried and true Maisie tradition of one part adventure of the emotional kind, one part romance, and one part laughs. To the end Maisie was the single girl, as this allowed her to get involved in continuing adventures of many kinds. These radio adventures of a liberated American "dame" from Brooklyn were tailored to post-WWII, and featured Maisie making her way (and having her way, most of the time) on both sides of the Atlantic. Maisie's favorite comment - "Likewise, I'm sure." THIS EPISODE: November 30, 1950. Program #42. "The Theatrical Agent" - MGM syndication. Commercials added locally. Maisie becomes the agent for an out-of-work actor who's been challenged to a duel...by an excellent shot! The program has also been identified as program #38 and #54. The date above is the date of first broadcast on WMGM, New York City. Ann Sothern, Peter Leeds, Gerald Mohr, Sidney Miller, Jerry Hausner, Frank Nelson, Bud Hiestand (announcer), Arthur Phillips (writer), Harry Zimmerman (composer, conductor). 28:03.

DATE: Thu, 29 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.38 MB
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The Adventures Of Ellery Queen - The Armchair Detective (03-27-46)

The Armchair Detective (Aired March 27, 1946) With Hugh Marlowe in the title role, Ellery Queen was introduced in The Adventures of Ellery Queen on CBS Radio on June 18, 1939, running until September 22, 1940. In 1942, the series moved to NBC Radio, airing until 1944. From 1945 to 1947, it was heard once again on CBS, returning to NBC in 1947 and then ABC Radio (1947-48). The premise was that a mystery would be dramatized but then interrupted when a panel of celebrities would attempt to solve the mystery. During the 1970s, syndicated radio fillers, Ellery Queen's Minute Mysteries, began with an announcer saying, "This is Ellery Queen..." and then outlining a case in one minute. The radio station encouraged callers to solve the mystery and win a sponsor's prize. Once they had a winner, the solution part of the spot would be played as confirmation. Tuska cited Ellery Queen, Master Detective (1940) and Ellery Queen's Penthouse Mystery (1941) as the best of the Bellamy-Lindsay pairings. "The influence of The Thin Man series was apparent in reverse", Tuska noted about Ellery Queen's Penthouse Mystery. "Ellery and Nikki are unmarried but obviously in love with each other. Probably the biggest mystery... is how Ellery ever gets a book written. Not only is Nikki attractive and perfectly willing to show off her figure", Tuska wrote, "but she also likes to write her own stories on Queen's time, and gets carried away doing her own investigations." In Ellery Queen, Master Detective, "the amorous relationship between Ellery and Nikki Porter was given a dignity, and therefore integrity", Tuska wrote, "that was lacking in the two previous entries in the series", made at Republic Pictures before Bellamy and Lindsay were signed by Columbia.

DATE: Wed, 28 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.80 MB
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The Crime Club - Mr. Smith's Hat (01-23-47)

Mr. Smith's Hat (01-23-47) The Crime Club was a series of 30-minute murder mystery stories adapted for radio by Stedman Coles or Wyllis Cooper from based on and featuring some of the stories from the Doubleday Crime Club books. Crime Club was broadcast by Mutual and produced and directed by Roger Bower. The post war stories were by various different authors and adapted for radio by among others Stedman Coles and Wyllis Cooper (writer of Lights Out and Quiet Please). The narrator played by Barry Thomson is the supposed curator of the Crime Club library. He speaks to the listener as if they have just arrived or phoned and requested one of the Club's books. The telephone rings, “Hello I hope I haven’t kept you waiting. This is the librarian, Silent Witnesses; yes we have that Crime Club book for you, come right over.” The organ plays suspenseful music, the door opens and the librarian says, “Ah you’re here, good take the easy chair by the window. Comfortable? The book is on this shelf…”He would take the book from the shelf and begin to tell the tale. The story would end with the Librarian informing you that there was a new Crime Club book available this week and every week in bookstores everywhere. THIS EPISODE: January 22, 1947. Mutual network. "Mr. Smith's Hat". Sustaining. A man calls the police to say he's going to be murdered. Ten seconds later, the man's daughter calls to say she just found the body. Roger Bower (producer, director), Elaine Kent, Raymond Edward Johnson, William Podmore, Eleanor Phelps, Paul Hammond, Shirling Oliver, Barry Thomson, Helen Riley (author), Stedman Coles (adaptor). 29:23.

DATE: Wed, 28 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.84 MB
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Casey Crime Photographer - Unlucky Numbers (06-15-50)

Unlucky Numbers (Aired June 15, 1950) Originally appearing in the pages of Black Mask, under the watchful eyes of then-editor Joseph Shaw, Flashgun Casey was the originally fast-talking crime photographer, a big, hot-tempered Boston Mick with a gift for gab and a nose for trouble. No "artiste", Casey kept a bottle of hooch and a .38 in his desk drawer, and boasted of being able to put a "slug where he aimed" and having "two big fists he knew how to use". He appeared in several short stories in the pulps and several novels. Casey, whose first name was never revealed, was the major crime photographer at the fictional Morning Express newspaper. With the help of reporter Ann Williams, he tracked down criminals and solved numerous crimes on this popular mystery-adventure series. Often a picture snapped at a crime scene led Casey to play detective. Jackson Beck and Bernard Lenrow were heard as Captian Logan and John Gibson played Ethelbert. Sponsors included Anchor-Hocking glass, Toni home permanet, Toni Creme Shampoo and Philip Morris cigarettes. Richard Carlyle and John Gibson portrayed the roles when the series premiered in April, 1951, but by June they were replaced by Darren McGavin and Cliff Hall. Ann Williams, a reporter on The Morning Express, was Casey’s girlfriend. During the summer of 1951 he acquired a partner in cub reporter Jack Lipman, who wrote copy to go with Casey’s pictures. This live series was set in and broadcast from, New York City.

DATE: Wed, 28 Jul 2010
SIZE: 13.4 MB
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The Chase & Sanborn Hour - Guest Is Ralph Bellamy (08-28-38)

Guest Is Ralph Bellamy (Aired August 28, 1938) The Chase and Sanborn Hour was the umbrella title for a series of US comedy and variety shows, sponsored by Chase and Sanborn Coffee, usually airing Sundays on NBC from 8pm to 9pm during the years 1929 to 1948. The series began in 1929 as The Chase and Sanborn Choral Orchestra, a half-hour musical variety show heard Sundays at 8:30pm on NBC. When Maurice Chevalier became the show's star, he received a record-breaking salary of $5000 a week. Violinist David Rubinoff (September 13, 1897 to October 06, 1986), became a regular in January 1931, introduced as "Rubinoff and His Violin."With Chevalier returning to Paris, Eddie Cantor was chosen as his replacement and the new 60-minute program, The Chase and Sanborn Hour, was launched September 13, 1931, teaming Cantor with Rubinoff and announcer Jimmy Wallington. The show established Cantor as a leading comedian, and his scriptwriter, David Freedman, as "The Captain of Comedy".When Jimmy Durante stepped in as a substitute for Cantor, making his first appearance on September 10, 1933, he was so successful that he was offered his own show. Then the world's highest paid radio star, Cantor continued as The Chase and Sanborn Hour's headliner until November 25, 1934. THIS EPISODE: August 28, 1938. "Guest Ralph Bellamy" - Red network. Sponsored by: Chase and Sanborn Coffee. Edward Arnold's last appearance as host. Nelson Eddy's first tune is, "March We Along." Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy appear from Chicago. Edward Arnold and Ralph Bellamy do a scene from "A Well Remembered Voice," by Sir James Barrie. The Dean of The School Of Speech of Northwestern University presents Charlie with an honorary degree: "Master of Innuendo." Dorothy Lamour, Edgar Bergen, Edward Arnold, Nelson Eddy, Ralph Bellamy (narrator), Robert Armbruster and His Orchestra, James M. Barrie (author), The Stroud Twins, Wendell Niles (announcer). 58:56.

DATE: Tue, 27 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.59 MB
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The Amos & Andy Show - Nightclub Spotter (05-20-51)

Nightclub Spotter (Aired May 20, 1951) As a result of its extraordinary popularity, Amos 'n' Andy profoundly influenced the development of dramatic radio. Working alone in a small studio, Correll and Gosden created an intimate, understated acting style that differed sharply from the broad manner of stage actors -- a technique requiring careful modulation of the voice, especially in the portrayal of multiple characters. The performers pioneered the technique of varying both the distance and the angle of their approach to the microphone to create the illusion of a group of characters. Listeners could easily imagine that that they were actually in the taxicab office, listening in on the conversation of close friends. The result was a uniquely absorbing experience for listeners who in radio's short history had never heard anything quite like Amos 'n' Andy. While minstrel-style wordplay humor was common in the formative years of the program, it was used less often as the series developed, giving way to a more sophisticated approach to characterization. Correll and Gosden were fascinated by human nature, and their approach to both comedy and drama drew from their observations of the traits and motivations that drive the actions of all people: while often overlapping popular stereotypes of African-Americans, there was at the same time a universality to their characters which transcended race... Beneath the dialect and racial imagery, the series celebrated the virtues of friendship, persistence, hard work, and common sense, and as the years passed and the characterizations were refined, Amos 'n' Andy achieved an emotional depth rivaled by few other radio programs of the 1930s. Above all, Correll and Gosden were gifted dramatists. Their plots flowed gradually from one into the next, with minor subplots building in importance until they took over the narrative, before receding to give way to the next major sequence, and seeds for future storylines were often planted months in advance. It was this complex method of story construction that kept the program fresh, and enabled Correll and Gosden to keep their audience in a constant state of suspense. The technique they developed for radio from that of the narrative comic strip endures to the present day as the standard method of storytelling in serial drama. THIS EPISODE: May 20, 1951. NBC network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. "Nightclub Spotter". The Kingfish is caught in another lie when Sapphire stops him sneaking home at 3AM. What in the world could he be doing at the Blue Slipper night club? Holy mackell! Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, Jeff Alexander (music), Ernestine Wade, Jester Hairston, Joe Connelly (writer), Bob Mosher (writer), Bob Ross (writer), Ken Niles (anouncer), Johnny Lee, Amanda Randolph, Roy Glenn, Norma Green, Pinto Colvig, Griff Barnett (commercial spokesman). . 28 minutes.

DATE: Tue, 27 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.75 MB
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Broadway Is My Beat - The Jane Darwell Murder Case (08-11-49)

The Jane Darwell Murder Case (Aired August 11, 1949) Broadway Is My Beat, a radio crime drama, ran on CBS from February 27, 1949 to August 1, 1954. With music by Robert Stringer, the show originated from New York during its first three months on the air, with Anthony Ross portraying Times Square Detective Danny Clover. John Dietz directed for producer Lester Gottlieb. Beginning with the July 7, 1949 episode, the series was broadcast from Hollywood with producer Elliott Lewis directing a new cast in scripts by Morton Fine and David Friedkin. The opening theme of "I'll Take Manhattan" introduced Detective Danny Clover (now played by Larry Thor), a hardened New York City cop who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle -- the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." Danny Clover narrated the tales of the Great White Way to the accompaniment of music by Wilbur Hatch and Alexander Courage, and the recreation of Manhattan's aural tapestry required the talents of three sound effects technicians (David Light, Ralph Cummings, Ross Murray). Bill Anders was the show's announcer. The supporting cast included regulars Charles Calvert (as Sgt. Gino Tartaglia) and Jack Kruschen (as Sgt. Muggavan), with episodic roles filled by such radio actors as Irene Tedrow, Barney Phillips, Lamont Johnson, Herb Ellis, Hy Averback, Edgar Barrier, Betty Lou Gerson, Harry Bartell, Sheldon Leonard, Martha Wentworth, Lawrence Dobkin and Mary Jane Croft. Show Notes From The OTRR. THIS EPISODE: August 11, 1949. "The Jane Darwell Murder Case" - CBS network. Sustaining. Scandal reporter Jed Stacy has received a prophesy in the mail...Jane Darnell will be found murdered tonight. Larry Thor, Charles Calvert, Gordon T. Hughes (producer, director), Morton Fine (writer), David Friedkin (writer), Lud Gluskin (music director), Gerald Mohr, Howard McNear. 29:15.

DATE: Tue, 27 Jul 2010
SIZE: 9.14 MB
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General Mills Radio Adventure Theater - The Sailor Who Wouldn't Give Up (07-09-77)

The Sailor Who Wouldn't Give Up (Aired July 9, 1977) The series had it origins in the meeting of two minds: the ad agency for General Mills at the time, Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample was looking for a different means to reach a child audience besides television, which was decreasing commercial minutes and increasing costs; and Himan Brown, producer-director of the CBS Radio Mystery Theater, who wanted to introduce new audiences to the dramatic form on radio. Tom Bosley was chosen as the host because of his television recognition from a kid’s oriented series, Happy Days. CBS chose to produce 52 original broadcasts followed by 52 repeat broadcasts. I believe they had hoped to maintain General Mills sponsorship during the complete 104 episodes, but General Mills dropped their sponsorship after the original broadcasts. The series continued for the next 52 repeats as the CBS Radio Adventure Theater. THIS EPISODE: July 9, 1977. Program #45. CBS network. "The Sailor Who Wouldn't Give Up". Sponsored by: General Mills. The program was repeated on January 8, 1978 as, "The CBS Radio Adventure Theatre." Tom Bosley (host), Jack London, James Agate Jr. (adaptor), Russell Horton, Earl Hammond, Himan Brown (producer, director). Jack London (1876- 1916) Jack London grew up in poverty and supported himself working at a cannery, as an oyster pirate, and as a merchant seaman on a Pacific sealing expedition. He read constantly and pushed himself to write a thousand words a day, six days a week. He was the highest paid novelist of his day, crediting his success as just pure hard work. His works include: The Call of the Wild, Sea-Wolf, Valley of the Moon, Martin Eden, and White Fang, in addition to dozens of stories and hundreds of articles.

DATE: Mon, 26 Jul 2010
SIZE: 3.40 MB
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Ripley's Believe It Or Not - Presidents (08-06-47)

Presidents (Aired August 6, 1947) Robert LeRoy Ripley was an American cartoonist, entrepreneur and amateur anthropologist, who created the world famous Ripley's Believe It or Not! newspaper panel series, radio show, and television show which feature odd 'facts' from around the world. Subjects covered in Ripley's cartoons and text ranged from sports feats to little known facts about unusual and exotic sites, but what ensured the concept's popularity may have been that Ripley also included items submitted by readers, who supplied photographs of a wide variety of small town American trivia, ranging from unusually shaped vegetables to oddly marked domestic animals, all documented by photographs and then depicted by Ripley's drawings. He died on broadcast during his weekly show May 27, 1949. Some have called Ripley a liar and accused him of exaggerating the facts, but throughout the years, he always gave appropriate sources. He claimed to be able to "prove every statement he made.", and the major reason he could make such a claim was that behind him stood the work of the indefatigable professional fact researcher, Norbert Pearlroth, who assembled Believe it or Not!s vast array of odd historical, geographical, and scientific facts and also verified the small-town claims submitted by readers. Pearlroth, who spoke 11 languages, spent 52 years as the feature's researcher, working in the New York Public Library ten hours a day, six days a week, finding and verifying unusual facts for Ripley and, after Ripley's death, for the King Features syndicate editors who took over management of the Believe it or Not!' panel. He was born December 25, 1890 and died May 27, 1949 (aged 58). THIS EPISODE: Radio Odditorium. "Presidents" - August 6, 1947. NBC network. Gregory Abbott tells a story about George Washington and his mother's horses, how Abe Lincoln first met Jefferson Davis, how FDR was annoying the Germans at the age of eleven. Gregory Abbott. 15 minutes.

DATE: Mon, 26 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.76 MB
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The Adventures Of Sam Spade - Edith Hamilton (04-17-49)

Edith Hamilton (Aired April 17, 1949) The Adventures of Sam Spade was first heard on ABC July 12, 1946, as a Friday-night summer series. The show clicked at once, and went into a regular fall lineup on CBS September 29, 1946. From then until 1949, Sam Spade was a Sunday-night thriller for Wildroot Cream Oil, starring Howard Duff in the title role. With Duff's departure, NBC took the series, leaving it on Sunday for Wildroot and starring Stephen Dunne as Spade. This version lasted until 1951, the last year running as a Friday sustainer. Spade's appearance on the air marked an almost literal transition from Dashiell Hammett's 1930 crime classic, The Maltese Falcon, where he first appeared. Spade was a San Francisco detective, one of the most distinctive of the hardboiled school. His jump to radio was wrought by William Spier, who had already carved out a reputation as a master of mystery in his direction of another highly rated CBS thriller, Suspense. Spier was editor, producer, director. A lifelong radio man, he had broken in during the primitive days of 1929 and earned his stripes serving on such pioneering shows as The March of Time. Spier assembled the writing team of Bob Tallman and Ann Lorraine and began putting Spade together. He was impressed by the deep, cynical, tough qualities in Howard Duff's voice. Duff had long experience as an actor, a career that traced back to his high school days in Seattle. He had originally wanted to be a cartoonist, but the sound of applause in a senior-year play at Roosevelt High changed all that. Suddenly stagestruck, Duff began hitting the boards. He worked in local theatre groups and cracked radio as an announcer on a local station. When the war came, Duff went with Armed Forces Radio as a correspondent, a job he held for more than four years. He emerged in Hollywood in 1945, a seasoned but unsung microphone veteran. With his perfect voice and polished delivery, it wasn't long before Duff was playing supporting parts in top dramas of the air. Sam Spade shot him to national fame. THIS EPISODE: April 17, 1949. Program #42. CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. "Subject, Edith Hamilton". Sam is hired to get a confession from a beautiful girl, but he winds up falling in love with her. Howard Duff, Dashiell Hammett (creator), Lurene Tuttle. 25 minutes.

DATE: Mon, 26 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.91 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "The Lone Ranger" - Border Rustlers (05-27-38)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "The Lone Ranger" - Border Rustlers (05-27-38) On radio, the Lone Ranger was played by several actors, including John L. Barrett who played the role on the test broadcasts on WEBR during early January, 1933; George Seaton (under the name George Stenius) from January 31 to May 9 of 1933; series director James Jewell and an actor known only by the pseudonym "Jack Deeds" (for one episode each), and then by Earle Graser from May 16, 1933, until April 7, 1941. On April 8, Graser died in a car accident, and for five episodes, as the result of being critically wounded, the Lone Ranger was unable to speak beyond a whisper, with Tonto carrying the action. Finally, on the broadcast of April 18, 1941, deep-voiced performer Brace Beemer, who had been the show's announcer for several years, took over the role and played the part until the end. Fred Foy, also an announcer on the show, took over the role on one broadcast on March 29, 1954, when Brace Beemer had a brief case of laryngitis. Tonto was played throughout the run by actor John Todd (although there were a few isolated occasions when he was replaced by Roland Parker, better known as Kato for much of the run of sister series The Green Hornet), and other supporting players were selected from Detroit area actors and studio staff. These included Jay Michael (who also played the lead on Challenge of the Yukon aka Sgt. Preston of the Yukon), Bill Saunders (as various villains, including Butch Cavendish), Paul Hughes (as the Ranger's friend Thunder Martin and as various army colonels and badmen), future movie star John Hodiak, Janka Fasciszewska (under the name Jane Fae), and others. The part of nephew Dan Reid was played by various child actors, including Bob Martin, James Lipton, and Dick Beals. The last new radio episode of the Lone Ranger was aired on September 3, 1954. Transcribed repeats (of 1952–53 episodes) continued on ABC until June 24, 1955, and then selected repeats appeared on NBC's late-afternoon weekday schedule [5:30–5:55pm Eastern] from September 1955 through May 25, 1956.

DATE: Mon, 26 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.80 MB
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It's A Crime Mr. Collins - Red Hot Mama (1956)

Red Hot Mama (1956) * Exact Date Is Unknown It's a Crime, Mr. Collins was a half-hour mystery/adventure radio program broadcast weekly from August, 1956 to February, 1957 by Mutual Broadcasting System in the United States that was a "flagrant rip-off of The Adventures of the Abbotts in which only the names had been changed." San Francisco private detective Greg Collins was played by Mandel Kramer (who had previously been heard as Lieutenant Tragg in the radio version of Perry Mason) and his wife, Gail Collins, was played by namesake Gail Collins. Each week, Gail Collins, "the gumshoe's gorgeous spouse -- with green-eyed predilections emerging as curvaceous damsels in distress frequently petitioned her husband -- shared his investigative exploits with her Uncle Jack and thereby with the listeners at home." Uncle Jack was played by Richard Denning, whom listeners had heard from 1952 to 1954 as amateur detective Jerry North in the radio version of Mr. and Mrs. North. Mandel Kramer had also played on Mr. and Mrs. North in the comedic supporting role of Brooklyn taxi driver Mahatma McGloin. Frances Crane's detective pair, Pat and Jean Abbott ... "came to radio on Abbott Mysteries on Mutual in 1945 and then ran for three consecutive summers. The series was resurrected by NBC in 1955 under the new title of The Adventures of the Abbotts and this nudged Mutual into producing a copycat show under the title It's A Crime, Mr. Collins. "Many programs in the Golden Age of Radio were flattered by their competitors. ... The Abbotts on NBC were copied exactly in Mutual's It's A Crime, Mr. Collins, including paraphrasing (the original author's) words." "Mutual even used ... the habit of putting a color in the title of every story." THIS EPISODE: 1956. Mutual network origination, syndication. "The Red Hot Mama". Commercials added locally. A reading of a will and a murder in a large house in the Florida Keys. The date is approximate. Mandel Kramer, Gail Collins, Richard Denning. 27:54.

DATE: Sun, 25 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.04 MB
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The Black Museum - The Wool Jacket (1952)

The Wool Jacket (1952) Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. A number of famous people have visited the musuem including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Orsen Welles hosted and narrated the shows. Following the opening, Mr. Welles would introduce the museum's item of evidence that was central to the case, leading into the dramatization. He also provided narration during the show and ended each show with his characteristic closing from the days of his Mercury Theater on the Air, 'remaining obediently yours'. THIS EPISODE: 1952. Program #4. Syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Sleeveless, Unstitched Wool Jacket". Sponsored by: Hemlock Farms. Trevor Moon falls in love and proposes to Evie Rose. Shortly after Evie pays an unannounced visit to Trevor's chicken farm, she disappears. The date is approximate. Syndicated rebroadcast date: October 9, 1974. Harry Alan Towers (producer), Orson Welles (narrator), Ira Marion (writer), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Sun, 25 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.67 MB
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Mr. & Mrs. North - Who Killed Mr. Stefano (12-10-50)

Who Killed Mr. Stefano (Aired December 10, 1950) Mr. and Mrs. North was a radio mystery series that aired on CBS from 1942 to 1954. Alice Frost and Joseph Curtin had the title roles when the series began in 1942. Publisher Jerry North and his wife Pam lived in Greenwich Village at 24 St. Anne's Flat. They were not professional detectives but simply an ordinary couple who stumbled across a murder or two every week for 12 years. The radio program eventually reached nearly 20 million listeners. The characters originated in 1930s vignettes written by Richard Lockridge for the New York Sun, and he brought them back for short stories in The New Yorker. These stories were collected in Mr. and Mrs. North (1936). Lockridge increased the readership after he teamed with his wife Frances on a novel, The Norths Meet Murder (1940), launching a series of 40 novels, including Death takes a Bow, Death on the Aisle and The Dishonest Murderer. Their long-run series continued for over two decades and came to an end in 1963 with the death of Frances Lockridge. Albert Hackett and Peggy Conklin had the title roles in the Broadway production Mr. and Mrs. North, which ran 163 performances at the Belasco Theatre from January 12, 1941, to May 31, 1941. Alfred De Liagre, Jr. produced and directed the play written by Owen Davis. In this version, the North's apartment was located on Greenwich Place, realized in a scenic design by Jo Mielziner. The Owen Davis play became a 1942 MGM movie starring Gracie Allen and William Post, Jr. with Millard Mitchell repeating his role of Detective Mullins from the Broadway production. Others in the cast were Paul Kelly, Rose Hobart and Keye Luke. In 1946, producer-director Fred Coe brought the Owen Davis play to television (on New York City's WNBT) with John McQuade and Maxine Stewart in the leads and Don Haggerty, Joan Marlowe and Millard Mitchell repeating their Broadway roles. Barbara Britton and Richard Denning starred in the TV adaptation seen on CBS from 1952 to 1953 and on NBC in 1954. Guest appearances on this series included Raymond Burr, Hans Conried, Mara Corday, Carolyn Jones, Katy Jurado, Jimmy Lydon, Julia Meade, William Schallert and Gloria Talbott. THIS EPISODE: December 10, 1950. CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. Who Killed Mr. Stefano? Everybody did it, it seems, except the obvious person, who protests that she's being framed! The date is approximate. Joseph Curtin, Alice Frost, Frances Lockridge (creator), Richard Lockridge (creator). 25 minutes.

DATE: Sun, 25 Jul 2010
SIZE: 13.4 MB
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The Lux Radio Theater - Captain Blood (02-22-37)

Captain Blood (Aired February 22, 1937) Broadcasting from New York, the series premiered at 2:30pm, October 14, 1934 on the NBC Blue Network with a production of Seventh Heaven starring Miriam Hopkins and John Boles in a full-hour adaptation of the 1922-24 Broadway production by Austin Strong. The host was the show's fictional producer, Douglass Garrick (portrayed by John Anthony). Doris Dagmar played another fictional character, Peggy Winthrop, who delivered the Lux commercials. Each show featured a scripted session with Garrick talking to the lead actors. Anthony appeared as Garrick from the premiere 1934 episode until June 30, 1935. Garrick was portrayed by Albert Hayes from July 29, 1935 to May 25, 1936, when the show moved to the West Coast. A famous urban legend claimed that actor Sonny Tufts was slated to appear as a guest alongside Joan Fontaine for a production of The Major and the Minor on Lux Radio Theater. When Joseph Cotten read the names of the next week's cast, he supposedly said, with a mixture of shock and astonishment, that listeners would hear "that new, talented personality... Sonny Tufts?!" However, this never happened. The legend began as a fake segment on one of Kermit Schafer's popular "Bloopers" albums, which have been criticized for their re-creations, fabrications and lack of accuracy. In actuality, Tufts was introduced by Cotten on the radio series Suspense, but Cotten's introduction was perfectly normal. THIS EPISODE: February 22, 1937. CBS network, KNX, Los Angeles aircheck. "Captain Blood". Sponsored by: Lux. Peter Blood is accused of treason and is exiled to the Spanish Main, where he escapes and becomes Captain Blood, a notorious pirate. Intermission guests are Charles Courtney (an expert safe-cracker, billed as the "world's greatest locksmith") and Douglas MacLean (intermission guest: silent movie actor and producer). Errol Flynn, Olivia De Havilland, Basil Rathbone, Donald Crisp, Henry Stephenson, Herbert Marshall (guest host), Charles Courtney, Douglas MacLean, Casey Robinson (screenwriter), Rafael Sabatini (author), Ferdinand Munier, Vernon Downing, Leo McCabe, Ward Dane, Eric Snowden, Wyndham Standing, Vernon Steele, Edward Cooper, Eric Lonsdale, Lou Merrill, Helen Brown, Frank Nelson (performer, program opening announcer), Jerry Gail, Charles Emerson, Robert Payton (triples), Viola Moore, George French, David Kerman (triples), Ross Forrester (triples), Kenneth Rundquist (chorus), Kirby Hoon (chorus), Hubert Head (chorus), Richard Davis (chorus), Tudor Williams (chorus), Dudley Kusell (chorus), Harry Stanton (chorus), William Brandt (chorus), Frank Woodruff (director), George Wells (adaptor), Charlie Forsyth (sound effects). 1 hour.

DATE: Sun, 25 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.45 MB
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The Lineup - Child Deserters (03-04-52)

Child Deserters (Aired March 4, 1952) The Lineup is a realistic police drama that gives radio audiences a look behind the scenes at police headquarters. Bill Johnstone plays Lt. Ben Guthrie, a quiet, calm-as-a-cupcake cucumber. Joseph Kearns (and from 1951 to 1953, Matt Maher) plays Sgt. Matt Grebb, a hot-tempered hot plate who is easily bored. The director and script writer often rode with police on the job and sat in on the police lineups to get ideas for The Lineup. They also read dozens of newspapers daily and intermeshed real stories with those that they used in the show. With Dragnet a smash hit, realism in police dramas was popular at the time this show aired. Don’t be caught without this radio show in your collection! THIS EPISODE: March 4, 1952. CBS network. "Child Deserters". Sustaining. William Johnstone, Wally Maher, Eddie Dunstedter (organ), Jaime del Valle (producer, director). A pornshop owner notifies the police that a 10 year old boy tried to hock a very expensive diamond necklace.

DATE: Sat, 24 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.73 MB
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The Jack Paar Program - Hair Tonics, School, Mail Delivery (09-28-47)

Hair Tonics, School, Mail Delivery (Aired September 28, 1947) Television and radio pioneer Jack Par has been called the most imitated personality in broadcasting. He virtually created the late-night talk show format as the host of The Tonight Show , one of television's longest continuously running programs. The Washington Post said, "Jack Paar was genuine, and the footprints he left on the loony moonscape of television are enormous; they will be there forever." As the stars of stage and screen were rising around him, Paar was becoming an icon himself, on television sets in the homes of millions of Americans across the country. During the Golden Age of television, Paar was its golden boy, charming guests and viewers alike. From 1957 to 1962, Paar was the king of late-night television as host of The Tonight Show, which NBC eventually renamed The Jack Paar Show. He turned it from a typical variety format into something very different. With a rare combination of intelligence, irreverence and intuition, he invented a new genre of programming that would become ubiquitous to television. Paar helped launch the careers of such performers as Carol Burnett, Woody Allen and Liza Minnelli, but his guests weren't limited to the glitterati. He discussed religion with Billy Graham, visited Albert Schweitzer in Africa, and talked politics with Richard Nixon, all before the transfixed eyes of the American television audience. THIS EPISODE: September 28, 1947. "Hair Tonics, School, Mail Delivery" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Lucky Strike. The last show of the series, but the show continues on another network, no longer a summer replacement for Jack Benny. "Jack Paar's Report To Consumers:" Hair Tonics. "Uncle Jack's Club For The Kiddies." A look at the post office. L. A. Speed Riggs (auctioneer), Hy Averback, The Page Cavanaugh Trio, Jerry Fielding and His Orchestra, Trudy Erwin, Hans Conried, Doris Singleton, Bob Nye (producer), George Foster (engineer), Jack Douglas (writer), Charles Buck (NBC representative), Jack Paar, F. E. Boone (auctioneer), Hal Kanter (writer), Seaman Jacobs (? writer), Leo Solomon (writer). 29:57.

DATE: Sat, 24 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.72 MB
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The Bickersons - John's New Fishing Pole (03-30-47)

John's New Fishing Pole (Aired March 30, 1947) The Bickersons was an American radio comedy program that aired from 1946 to 1951. Born as a recurring skit on The Chase and Sanborn Hour and refined on the lesser-remembered Drene Time variety show, it stood the already-typical domestic presentation of radio and its infant offspring, television, so squarely on its head that there were those who feared the show. The show's married protagonists spent nearly all their time together in relentless verbal war, and many people believed that the show's sourly cynical take on the institution of marriage was more than merely detrimental to the nation's post-World War II health. (The same kind of charges of "detrimental" were later leveled against programs such as Married... with Children and The Simpsons.) The Bickersons was created by Philip Rapp, the one-time Eddie Cantor writer who had also created the Fanny Brice skits (for The Ziegfeld Follies of the Air and Maxwell House Coffee Time) that grew into radio's Baby Snooks. Several years after the latter established itself a long-running favourite, Rapp developed and presented John and Blanche Bickerson, first as a short sketch on The Old Gold Show and The Chase and Sanborn Hour (the show that made stars of Edgar Bergen and his dummy, Charlie McCarthy), and then as a 15-minute situational sketch as part of Drene Time. This was a variety show starring Don Ameche and singer-actress Frances Langford as co-hosts, airing on NBC and sponsored by Drene Shampoo. Announcing the show—and later familiar to television viewers as The Millionaire's presenter and executive secretary, Michael Anthony—was Marvin Miller. Drene Time typically opened with Langford singing a big band-style arrangement before Ameche and Langford would slip into routine comedy, often aided by co-star (and future Make Room for Daddy star) Danny Thomas, in routines that often hooked around Ameche's frustration that Thomas seemed more interested in modern technology and discoveries than in women. THIS EPISODE: March 30, 1947. John's New Fishing Pole is destroyed by Amos who uses it as a plunger. The family episode is preceded by the outstanding voice of Francis Langford and the humor of Danny Thomas. Don Ameche, Frances Langford, Danny Thomas, Lew Parker, Tony Romano and His Orchestra and Marvin Miller (announcer). 29:01.

DATE: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.28 MB
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Barry Craig Confidential Investigator - Murder In Duplicate (10-10-51)

Murder In Duplicate (Aired October 10, 1951) Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator is one of the few detective radio series that had separate versions of it broadcast from both coasts. Even the spelling changed over the years. It was first "Barry Crane" and then "Barrie Craig". NBC produced it in New York from 1951 to 1954 and then moved it to Hollywood where it aired from 1954 to 1955. It attracted only occasional sponsors so it was usually a sustainer.William Gargan, who also played the better known television (and radio) detective Martin Kane, was the voice of New York eye BARRY CRAIG while Ralph Bell portrayed his associate, Lt. Travis Rogers. Craig's office was on Madison Avenue and his adventures were fairly standard PI fare. He worked alone, solved cases efficiently, and feared no man. As the promos went, he was "your man when you can't go to the cops. Confidentiality a speciality."Like Sam Spade, Craig narrated his stories, in addition to being the leading character in this 30 minute show. Nearly sixty episodes are in trading circulation today. THIS EPISODE: October 10, 1951. NBC network. "Murder In Duplicate". A boxing champ is suspected of throwing a fight and a nosey reporter feels he needs to hire Barry as a bodyguard. Sustaining. The system cue has been deleted. Arthur Jacobson (director), Edward King (announcer), Herb Vigran, William Gargan, John Roeburt (writer), Jeanne Bates, Herb Ellis, Hal Gerard, Julie Bennett. 29:17.

DATE: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
SIZE: 9.78 MB
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Sears Radio Theater (Mutual) - The Ransom (07-25-79)

The Ransom (Aired July 25, 1979) Mutual Radio Theater ( Sears Radio Theater ) was an anthology series of radio drama which ran weeknightly on CBS Radio in 1979, sponsored by the department-store chain; in its second year, 1980, it moved to the Mutual Broadcasting System and became the Mutual Radio Theater; the MBS series was repeats from the CBS run, until September of 1980, when a short season of new dramas was presented. The Mutual run was still most often sponsored by Sears. Often paired with The CBS Radio Mystery Theater on those stations which cleared it in its first season, the SRT offered a different genre of drama for each day's broadcast. Monday was "Western Night" and was hosted by Lorne Greene. Tuesday was "Comedy Night", hosted by Andy Griffith. Wednesday was "Mystery Night" with Vincent Price as host. Thursday was "Love And Hate Night" with Cicely Tyson doing honors as host. Finally, Friday brought "Adventure Night", first hosted by Richard Widmark and later by Howard Duff and then by Leonard Nimoy. Though less long-lived than NPR's Earplay or the Mystery Theater, it was an ambitious if not particularly critically-favored attempt to reinvigorate a neglected field. THIS EPISODE: July 25, 1979. Program #123. CBS network. "The Ransom". Sponsored by: Sears Roebuck and Company. Percy Grainger (writer), Vincent Price (host), Lurene Tuttle, Vic Perrin, Steven Markle, Jack Carroll, Barney Phillips, Don Diamond, Fletcher Markle (producer, director). 52 minutes.

DATE: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.89 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Gunsmoke" - The Old Lady (01-24-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Gunsmoke" - The Old Lady (Aired January 24, 1953) From 1955 to 1961, Gunsmoke was a half-hour show. It then went to an hour-long format for the rest of its long run. From 1955 to 1966, it was in black and white, then in color from 1966 to 1975. In the early 1960s, older episodes of the series were rebroadcast under the title Marshal Dillon. In 1967, the show's twelfth season, CBS planned to cancel the series, but widespread viewer response — it was even mentioned in Congress — along with domestic pressure on the CBS head of programming by his wife, convinced them to continue it in the early evening on Mondays instead of Saturday nights. This seemingly minor change led to a spike in ratings that saw the series once again reach the top 20 in the Nielsen ratings before fading again before its cancellation in 1975. Gunsmoke was the show that ushered in the age of the adult western, which brought about Bonanza, Wagon Train and literally a hundred others. Ironically, it also was the last western still airing when it was cancelled. James Arness and Milburn Stone were the only 2 original series regulars to remain with the series for the entire duration of its 20-season run. In 1987, many of the original cast reunited for the made-for-television film, Gunsmoke: Return to Dodge, which was filmed in Alberta, Canada. This was a huge ratings success and led to four more reunion films being filmed in the U.S.: Gunsmoke: The Last Apache (1990), Gunsmoke: To the Last Man (1992), Gunsmoke: The Long Ride (1993), and Gunsmoke: One Man's Justice (1994). The series also inspired a Gunsmoke video game produced for the NES by Capcom. THIS EPISODE: January 24, 1953. CBS network. "The Old Lady". Sustaining. Ellen Henry, a bitter widow with a drunken son, has a secret that involves stolen cattle. William Conrad, Parley Baer, Sam Edwards, John Dehner, Herb Vigran, Jeanette Nolan, Harry Bartell, Roy Rowan (announcer), Kathleen Hite (writer), Rex Koury (composer, conductor), Norman Macdonnell (director). 29:57.

DATE: Fri, 23 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.07 MB
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The Sealtest Variety Theater - Guest Is Burt Lancaster (04-07-49)

Guest Is Burt Lancaster (Aired April 7, 1949) The Sealtest Variety Theater (1946-49) aired on Thursday nights at 9:30, it was a musical variety and comedy show with glamorous Dorothy Lamour as hostess. During the World War II years, Lamour was among the most popular pinup girls among American servicemen. Other regulars were Eddie Bracken and Frank Nelson. The show always had one or more stars appearing like Ronald Colman, Gregory Peck, Bob Hope, Jim and Marian Jordan, Ed Gardner, Harold Peary, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis and many more. THIS EPISODE: April 7, 1949. "Guest Star Is Burt Lancaster" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Sealtest. Dorothy's first song is "Buttons and Bows." Eddie Bracken is afraid that guest Burt Lancaster is planning a bank robbery. Dorothy Lamour, Henry Russell and His Orchestra, The Crew Chiefs, John Laing (announcer), Glenhall Taylor (director), Frank Nelson, Eddie Bracken, Burt Lancaster, Sam Edwards, Alan Reed, Howard Harris (writer), Sid Zelinka (writer). 29:31.

DATE: Thu, 22 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.49 MB
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The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes - The Naval Treaty (06-25-78)

The Naval Treaty (Aired June 25, 1978) Holmes states that he first developed his deduction methods while an undergraduate. The author Dorothy L. Sayers suggested that, given details in two of the Adventures, Holmes must have been at Cambridge rather than Oxford and that "of all the Cambridge colleges, Sidney Sussex [College] perhaps offered the greatest number of advantages to a man in Holmes’ position and, in default of more exact information, we may tentatively place him there". His earliest cases, which he pursued as an amateur, came from fellow university students. According to Holmes, it was an encounter with the father of one of his classmates that led him to take up detection as a profession and he spent the six years following university working as a consulting detective, before financial difficulties led him to take Watson as a roommate, at which point the narrative of the stories begins. From 1881, Holmes is described as having lodgings at 221B Baker Street, London, from where he runs his private detective agency. 221B is an apartment up seventeen steps, stated in an early manuscript to be at the "upper end" of the road. Until the arrival of Dr. Watson, Holmes works alone, only occasionally employing agents from the city's underclass, including a host of informants and a group of street children he calls the Baker Street Irregulars. The Irregulars appear in three stories, "The Sign of the Four", "A Study in Scarlet" and "The Adventure of the Crooked Man". THIS EPISODE: June 25, 1978. BBC Radio4, Birmingham origination. "The Naval Treaty". Barry Foster, David Buck, Arthur Conan Doyle (author), Richard Kaye, Bill Morrison (adaptor), Richard Hurndel, Rosalyn Shanks, John Rye, Steven Hancock, Jean Lambert, Tony Malloy, Peter Novis (director). 29:18.

DATE: Thu, 22 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.07 MB
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Boston Blackie - Blackie's Killer Car (07-16-45)

Blackie's Killer Car (Aired July 16, 1945) Boston Blackie is a fictional character created by author Jack Boyle (born before 1880; died circa 1928). Originally a jewel thief and safecracker in Boyle's novels, he became a detective in adaptations for films, radio and television—an "enemy to those who make him an enemy, friend to those who have no friend." Jack Boyle's stories first appeared in the early 20th Century. "The Price of Principle" was a short story in the July 1914 issue of The American Magazine. Boyle's character also turned up in Cosmopolitan. In 1917, Redbook published the novelette "Boston Blackie’s Mary," and the magazine brought the character back with "The Heart of the Lily" (February, 1921). Boyle's stories were collected in the book Boston Blackie (1919), which was reprinted in 1979 by Gregg Press. Boyle died in 1928.Boston Blackie was originally produced to be a summer replacement series for the Amos & Andy Show. Then, a company called ZIV Productions bought the series and synicated it. Stations just couldn't buy up the rights to broadcast the episodes fast enough and Boston Blackie went on to become a major hit for another 200+ episodes over 5 additional years on the air! The Boston Blackie radio show was inspired by the super successful Boston Blackie movies of the 1920s to the early 1940s. People sometimes wonder why Chester Morris and Richard Lane did not stay with the radio program after the summer run. Well ... they had starred in several of the movies and went on to star in several more. Movie salaries were much better than the paychecks for starring on a radio show! Maurice Tarplin was also starring in another hit radio program while doing Boston Blackie. There was also a Boston Blackie TV Show that lasted a couple of seasons from 1951-52 and starred Kent Taylor as Boston Blackie.

DATE: Thu, 22 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.71 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Frontier Town" - End Of The Trail (06-26-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Frontier Town" - End Of The Trail (Aired June 26, 1953) Chad Remington, played by Jeff Chandler for the first 23 shows, was a two fisted lawyer in the town of Dos Rios. Chad's sidekick, Cherokee O'Bannon, played by Wade Crosby, who performed his role in a WC Fields dialect. Mr. Chandler remained in the lead role for the first 23 shows and was replaced by Reed Hadley who played Remington until the end of the series. FRONTIER TOWN was a syndicated Western that ran through the 1952-1953 season. THIS EPISODE: June 26, 1953. Program #27. Broadcasters Program Syndicate/Bruce Eells and Associates syndication. "End Of The Trail". Music fill for local commercial insert. Chicago "Eddie Dolin", owner of the Bottoms-Up bar, was not just happy making money hand over fist, he was trying to move on the local ranchers and force them to sell to him. The date is approximate. Reed Hadley, Wade Crosby, Bob Mitchell (organist), Ivan Ditmars (possible organist), Bill Forman (announcer), Paul Franklin (writer, director). 28:11.

DATE: Thu, 22 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.01 MB
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The Man Called X - Swindle To Honolulu (06-05-47)

Swindle To Honolulu (Aired June 5, 1947) The Man Called X was a old-time radio espionage drama series that aired on and off from 1944 through 1951 and sponsored by Frigidaire and later General Motors. Herbert Marshall stars as Ken Thurston, a globe hopping government agent. The show opens with the familiar line "Wherever there is mystery, intrigue, romance, in all the strange and dangerous places of the world, there you will find The Man Called X". Thurston works diligently every week to make the world a safer place by thwarting Cold War enemies and cooling off hotspots of unrest wherever they may be. He is aided/thwarted by his everpresent chiseling "sidekick" Pegon Zeldschmidt, played by Leon Belasco. Marshall, British by birth, starred in films with many of the greatest, especially Detreich in Blonde Venus, Bette Davis in The Virgin Queen, Vincent Price in The Fly, and a great cast in The Razor's Edge, where he portrayed W. Somerset Maugham.The Gordon Jenkins Orchestra supplied the exotic background music. THIS EPISODE: June 5, 1947. "Swindle To Honolulu". - CBS network. Commercials deleted. A land company in Hawaii has been swindling veterans by selling land they don't own. They also frame Ken Thurston for murder! Herbert Marshall, Wendell Niles (nnouncer), Leon Belasco, Jack Johnstone (director), Johnny Green (music), Les Crutchfield (writer). 27:23.

DATE: Thu, 22 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.50 MB
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21st Precinct - Doctor's Daughter Missing (04-20-55)

Doctor's Daughter Missing (Aired April 20, 1955) 21st Precinct was one of the realistic police drama series of the early- to mid-1950's that were aired in the wake of Dragnet. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operation of a single police precinct. Actual cases were used as the basis for stories. The Precinct Captain acted as the narrator for the series.The official title of the series according to the series scripts and the CBS series promotional materials was 21st Precinct and not Twenty-First Precinct or Twenty First Precinct which appears in many Old-Time Radio books. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operations of a single police precinct. Actual cases would be used as the basis for stories. It was mentioned in each episode's closing by the announcer that, "Twenty-first Precinct is presented with the official cooperation of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association an organization of more than 20,000 members of the Police Department, City of New York." THIS EPISODE: April 20, 1955. "Doctor's Daughter Missing" - CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. A missing 6 year old girl sets the scene for city wide police action. The system cue and music fill have been deleted. Announced as the last program of the current series. Everett Sloane, Stanley Niss (writer, director), Ken Lynch, Harold Stone, Lola Peyser, Jan Miner, Les Damon, Frank Campanella, George Bryan (announcer). 28:23.

DATE: Wed, 21 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.85 MB
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The Mercury Summer Theater - The Search For Henri Lefe (07-12-46)

The Search For Henri Lefe (Aired July 12, 1946) The first radio production was of Bram Stoker's Dracula, with Welles playing both Count Dracula and Doctor Seward; other adaptations included Treasure Island, A Tale of Two Cities, The Thirty-Nine Steps, The Man Who Was Thursday and The Count of Monte Cristo. Originally scheduled for nine weeks, the network extended the run into the autumn, moving the show from its Monday night slot, where it was the summer substitute for the Lux Radio Theatre, to a Sunday night slot opposite Edgar Bergen'spopular variety show. The early programs were praised by critics, but ratings were low. One broadcast changed the ratings: The October 30, 1938 adaptation of H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds. Possibly thousands of listeners thought Martians were in fact invading the earth, due to the faux-news quality of most of the broadcast. Significant publicity was generated, and The Mercury Theater on the Air quickly became one of radio's top-rated shows. The War of the Worlds notoriety had a welcome side effect of netting the show the sponsorship of Campbell's Soup, guaranteeing its survival for a period, and beginning on December 9, 1938, the show was known as The Campbell Playhouse. Welles revived the Mercury Theater title for a short series in the summer of 1946. The company moved to Hollywood for their second season, and continued briefly after Welles' final perfomance in March of 1940. THIS EPISODE: July 12, 1946. CBS network. "The Search For Henri Lefevre". Sponsored by: Pabst Beer. No sooner does a composer finish his composition, then he hears it being performed on the radio! An interesting comparison with the same script produced on "Suspense" starring Paul Muni. Welles mentions that next week, he will do again "Treasure Island," which he says "is the first drama I ever did on CBS." Next week however, "Life With Adam" was substituted. Orson Welles (producer, host, performer), Lucille Fletcher (writer), Mercedes McCambridge, Jim Ameche (announcer), Bernard Herrmann (composer, conductor). 30:09.

DATE: Wed, 21 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.05 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - According To Law (01-29-53)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - According To Law (Aired January 29, 1953) Broadcast constantly sometimes once a week sometimes 3 times a week By Mutual, between 1942 and 1956. Western Drama mainly for the young ones or maybe just the young at heart. I say the young at heart, because The Cisco Kid and his likeable but simple partner Pancho were a couple of lovable rogues and because there was usually a lovely senorita around in every episode who fell madly in love with Sisco, there may well have been an element of lady listeners included in the audience rating figures. Here they were, these two Mexican bandits, travelling from sunset to sunset (because that's where they always road off to at the end of each episode) robbing the rich, but I wouldn't say giving it to the poor. At least they did it in a kind and humorous way. It was more a question of the victim being relieved of the heavy burden of his or her riches, rather than having some of their prized possessions taken away from them. Half the fun in the series was listening to Pancho try to explain in his simple Mexican way that the sheriff's posse was hard on their heels and to quote him, "Ceesco, eef they catch up with us, perhaps they weel keel us." At the beginning The Cisco Kid was played by Jackson Beck then later Jack Mather took over the role. Whilst Pancho was played first by Louis Sorin then by Harry Lang. Originally the Announcer was Michael Rye and the Director Jock McGregor and during the days of Jack Mather and Harry Lang the Producer was J. C. Lewis with the series being written by Larry Hays. THIS EPISODE: January 29, 1953. Program #56. Mutual-Don Lee network origination, Ziv syndication. "According To Law". Commercials added locally. Jack Mather, Harry Lang. 27:16.

DATE: Wed, 21 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.54 MB
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Danger With Grainger - Wandering Weapon Case (1956)

Wandering Weapon Case (1956) Danger With Granger arrived too late in the Golden Age of Radio to have any real impact on the listening public. Mutual aired this show, starting in 1956, on Monday nights at 8:30 pm. It was a half hour show that featured a private eye in New York City, Steve Granger. His two primary companions were Cal Hendrix, a reporter who served as an all-purpose source of criminal info, and Jake Rankin, a police detective with whom he had a grudging rivalry. The writing on the show seemed to incorporate most of the standard cliche's of the P.I. world. Granger, who was both the star and the first-person narrator of the show (not an uncommon practice with radio gumshoes), never saw a woman, instead "he gave the doll the once-over." He didn't kick with his foot, he "lifted a size 10." Instead of paying cash, he "forked over numbered lettuce." THIS EPISODE: "Wandering Weapon Case" (1956). Mutual network. Commercials deleted. The story of a man who believed he could get away with murder, and very nearly did! Mr. Milroy is a criminologist who thinks he's very clever. The date is approximate. . 27:07.

DATE: Tue, 20 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.70 MB
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X-Minus One - Hostess (12-12-56)

Hostess (Aired December 12, 1956) Initially a revival of NBC's Dimension X (1950-51), X Minus One is widely considered among the finest science fiction dramas ever produced for radio. The first 15 episodes were new versions of Dimension X episodes, but the remainder were adaptations of newly published science fiction stories by leading writers in the field, including Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, Robert A. Heinlein, Frederik Pohl and Theodore Sturgeon, along with a few original scripts. The series was cancelled after the 126th broadcast on January 9, 1958. However, the early 1970s brought a wave of nostalgia for old-time radio; a new experimental episode, "The Iron Chancellor" by Robert Silverberg, was created in 1973, but it failed to revive the series. NBC also tried broadcasting the old recordings, but their irregular once-monthly scheduling kept even devoted listeners from following the broadcasts. All episodes of the show survive. Future Tense! was a 1974-76 radio series, produced in Kalamazoo, Michigan, with local actors performing scripts updated from X Minus One by Professor Eli Segal. The show was a production of WMUK, the college radio station of Western Michigan University. Segal also produced X Minus One recreations on his Audion Theatre (1990). THIS EPISODE: December 12, 1956. NBC network. "Hostess". Sustaining. An ambassador from an alien race is visiting the home of a typical Earth couple. The ambassador's "hostess" learns of a second definition. Teri Keane, Les Damon, Kermit Murdock, Isaac Asimov (author), Ernest Kinoy (adaptor), William Welch (producer), Daniel Sutter (director), Fred Collins (announcer). 29:22.

DATE: Tue, 20 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.94 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Red Ryder" - Trouble At Boullion Bend (03-03-42)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Red Ryder" - Trouble At Boullion Bend (Aired March 3, 1942) Red Ryder was a newspaper comic western hero, and was a natural for the radio kids. Known on the air as "America's famous fighting cowboy," he was still an upstanding cowboy action hero. The hero was first seen in a series of short stories by writer-cartoonist Fred Harman, who adapted it as a comic strip for the Los Angeles Times in 1938 before it finally became a radio show. For almost a decade, Red Ryder starred in half-hour cowboy adventures featuring a great cast of characters including his pal Buckskin and his little indian boy ward, "Little Beaver". The ranch homestead was cared for by the "The Duchess," actually Red's aunt. Red Ryder was always ready for adventure with his pals, Buckskin Blodgett and Rawhide Rolinson. Little Beaver was beloved by the kids who thought it would be great to be like Little Beaver and be in on all the western action! At one point, Red Ryder was pitted against The Lone Ranger in the radio "badlands," and did really well against the more famous and well established masked man. In the later years, the show played on the West Coast via Don Lee productions, as sponsored by regional bread maker Langendorf Bread. It remained a mainstay of West Coast juvenile radio for all the little pre-TV buckaroos. After the radio show went off the air, Red Ryder and "little Beaver" continued to please 50's kids who avidly read his latest adventures in the popular "Red Ryder" comic books.

DATE: Tue, 20 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.35 MB
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The FBI In Peace & War - The Traveling Man (06-10-53)

The Traveling Man (Aired June 10, 1953) The FBI in Peace and War was a radio crime drama inspired by Frederick Lewis Collins' book, The FBI in Peace and War. The idea for the show came from Louis Pelletier who wrote many of the scripts. Among the show's other writers were Jack Finke, Ed Adamson and Collins. It aired on CBS from November 25, 1944 to September 28, 1958, it had a variety of sponsors (including Lava Soap, Wildroot Cream-Oil, Lucky Strike, Nescafe and Wrigley's) over the years. In 1955 it was the eighth most popular show on radio, as noted in Time: The Nielsen ratings of the top ten radio shows seemed to indicate that not much has changed in radio: 1) Jack Benny Show (CBA), 2) Amos 'n' Andy (CBS), 3) People Are Funny (NBC), 4) Our Miss Brooks (CBS) 5) Lux Radio Theater (NBC), 6) My Little Margie (CBS), 7) Dragnet (NBC), 8) FBI in Peace and War (CBS), 9) Bergen and McCarthy (CBS), 10) Groucho Marx (NBC). Martin Blaine and Donald Briggs headed the cast. The theme was the March from Prokofiev's The Love for Three Oranges. THIS EPISODE: June 10, 1953. CBS network. "The Traveling Man". Sponsored by: Brylcreme, Lava Soap, Nescafe. A young man double-crosses the stolen car ring he's been working for and heads west with his new bride. Frederick L. Collins (creator). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Mon, 19 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.59 MB
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Agatha Christie Presents Hercule Poirot - The Deadest Man In The World (07-19-45)

The Deadest Man In The World (Aired July 19, 1945) Hercule Poirot is Agatha Christie's greatest creation, many say. One of the most famous detectives in all fiction, he was created in 1916 (when Agatha Christie penned the first novel The Mysterious Affair at Styles). The Belgian detective appeared in 33 novels and 65 short stories and is the only fictional character to be honored with a front page obituary of The New York Times. He doesn't have any disorders to speak of, but demands order. He likes things in an orderly manner (ie, books arranged on a shelf according to height) and approves of symmetry everywhere (residence Whitehaven Mansions is picked because of its symmetry). He despises dust and unclean homes and favors the indoors (especially central heating in the winter). Poirot also values method--to him the greatest method or tool in solving crime is using the "gray cells" of the brain. He derides such methods as examing footprints, collecting cigarette ash, searching for clues with a magnifying glass, or taking fingerprints. He says any crime can be solved with simply placing the puzzle pieces correctly. He is an armchair detective-- he has to simply "sit still in an armchair and think". Of course, Poirot's mustache is as famous as his "little gray cells". He has pride is his luscious, waxed black mustache and is always meticulously dressed down to his patent leather shoes. THIS EPISODE: uly 19, 1945. Mutual network, WCPO, Cincinnati aircheck. "The Deadest Man In The World". Sustaining. A set-up for murder severely underestimates the abilities of Mr. Poirot! Richard Widmark is possibly in the cast. Harold Huber, Jackson Beck, Richard Widmark. 29:30.

DATE: Mon, 19 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.58 MB
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Adventures in Research - 2 Episodes (09-17-46) (10-08-46)

"The Birth Of The Balloon" (Aired September 17, 1946) and "Dynamite" (Aired October 8, 1946) Down through the long corridors of time, man has strived unceasingly to solve the hidden mysteries of the universe...has sought to pierce the veil that shrouds the eternal riddle of life. Back from the dust of centuries past...reaching forward through the portals of tomorrow, comes a voice that will not be stilled...a voice that cries: Learn! Investigate! Instruct! Urging new generations to carry forward the work of progress for humanity...listen to the voice of science!" These syndicated program were produced at the studios of KDKA (Pittsburgh) and distributed by the station's parent company, Westinghouse Radio Stations Inc. The series began about 1942 and were distributed, probably as a public service educational feature, for weekly programming. The early shows were discussions with Paul Shannon asking the questions, Dr. Phillips Thomas (research physicist for Westinghouse, specializing in electronics) answering the questions. The later programs were written by Dr. Thomas, but were dramatizations instead of the Q and A fomat. The programs themselves present a fascinating look at the state of scientific knowledge during the war and the immediate post-war years. Many of the topics are hopelessly outdated, a surprising number are still up to date and reflect the state of knowledge about the subject many years later. The purpose of instilling an interest in science in the general public is still as valid now as it was then. Even more important, the program themselves are good radio and interesting. Those listeners with little or no interest in science will still be captivated. The post-war programs feature an organist whose efforts range from mediocre to absolutely great! TODAY'S SHOW: September 17, 1946 - Program #191. Westinghouse syndication. "The Birth Of The Balloon". Sustaining. A story about the Montgolfier brothers and the beginnings of manned flight. 15 minutes. October 8, 1946 - Program #194. Westinghouse syndication. "Dynamite". Sustaining. The history of dynamite and Alfred Noble. 15 minutes.

DATE: Mon, 19 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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Candy Matson - The Fortune Teller (09-21-52)

The Fortune Teller (Aired September 21, 1952) Candy Matson was the private eye star of "Candy Matson, YUkon 2-8208", an NBC West Coast show which first aired in March 1949 and was created by Monty Masters. He cast his wife, Natalie Parks, in the title role of this sassy, sexy PI. Her understated love interest, Lt. Ray Mallard, was played by Henry Leff while her assistant and best pal, aptly named Rembrandt Watson, was the voice of Jack Thomas. Every show opened with a ringing telephone and our lady PI answering it with "Candy Matson, YU 2-8209" and then the organ swung into the theme song, "Candy". Each job took Candy from her apartment on Telegraph Hill into some actual location in San Francisco. The writers, overseen by Monty, worked plenty of real Bay Area locations into every plot. Candy was bright, tough, and fearless. She used her pistol infrequently, but was unintimidated by bad guys, regardless of circumstances. Threats, assaults, and even bullets would usually produce a caustic, but clever, response for this blonde sleuth. She and Mallard were frequently working the same case, but she usually solved it first. OTR experts generally agree that this show was the finest of all the female PIs. THIS EPISODE: September 21, 1952. NBC network, San Francisco origination. "The Fortune Teller". Sustaining. Industrialist Allison Gray is missing, and the stars tell Candy that an astrologer is involved. The phone number is announced as being the one above. The phone number is different on other broadcasts. Possibly an audition. Lou Tobin, Henry Leff, Jack Thomas, Monte Masters (writer, director), Natalie Masters, Eloise Rowan (organist), Dudley Manlove (announcer), Hal Burdick, Bill Brownell (sound effects), Jane Bennett Carnell, Clarence Stevens (engineer). 29:32.

DATE: Sun, 18 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.88 MB
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Macabre - The Edge Of Evil (01-08-62)

The Edge Of Evil (Aired January 8, 1962) Macabre - Macabre made the scene in November 13th 1961 and ran until January 8th 1962. Spooky and supernatural theme, Macabre was a Tokyo Studios, Far East Network of the Armed Forces Radio Service production. Creators of the series were William Verdier, who also starred in the series, and John F. Buey Jr., a program director with FEN Tokyo. THIS EPISODE: January 8, 1962. Program #8. AFRTS-FEN origination. "The Edge Of Evil". A good ghost story about a scientist's creation. Possibly the last show of the series. John Buey, Mitzi Hennessey, James Connolly (sound patterns), Walt Sheldon (writer, director), Milton Radmilovich, William Virdier, Hiroshi Ono (technical supervisor). 30:14.

DATE: Sun, 18 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.54 MB
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The Adventures Of Ozzie & Harriet - Sports Heroes (01-09-49)

Sports Heroes (Aired January 9, 1949) The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet launched on CBS October 8, 1944, making a mid-season switch to NBC in 1949. The final years of the radio series were on ABC (the former NBC Blue Network) from October 14, 1949, to June 18, 1954.The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, an American radio and television series, was once the longest-running, live-action situation comedy on American television, having aired on ABC from 1952 to 1966 after a ten-year run on radio. Starring Ozzie Nelson and his wife, singer Harriet Hilliard (she dropped her maiden name after the couple ended their music career), the show's sober, gentle humor captured a large, sustaining audience, although it never rated in the top ten programs, and later critics tended to dismiss it as fostering a slightly unrealistic picture of post-World War II American family life. When Skelton was drafted, Ozzie Nelson was prompted to create his own family situation comedy. The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet launched on CBS October 8, 1944, making a mid-season switch to NBC in 1949. The final years of the radio series were on ABC (the former NBC Blue Network) from October 14, 1949, to June 18, 1954. In an arrangement that amplified the growing pains of American broadcasting, as radio "grew up" into television (as George Burns once phrased it), the Nelsons' deal with ABC gave the network itself the right to move the show to television whenever it wanted to do it---they wanted, according to the Museum of Broadcast Communications, to have talent in the bullpen and ready to pitch, so to say, on their own network, rather than risk it defecting to CBS (where the Nelsons began) or NBC. Their sons, David and Ricky, did not join the cast until five years after the radio series began. THIS EPISODE: January 9, 1949. "Sports Heros" - NBC network. Sponsored by: International Silver. When the boys show too much interest in athletics, Ozzie gets them to admire great men of history. Ozzie Nelson, Harriet Hilliard. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Sun, 18 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.68 MB
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Dimension X - The Lost Race (05-20-50)

The Lost Race (Aired May 20, 1950) Dimension X was first heard on NBC April 8, 1950, and ran until September 29, 1951. Strange that so little good science fiction came out of radio; they seem ideally compatible, both relying heavily on imagination. Some fine isolated science fiction stories were developed on the great anthology shows, Suspense and Escape. But until the premiere of Dimension X -- a full two decades after network radio was established -- there were no major science fiction series of broad appeal to adults. This show dramatized the work of such young writers as Ray Bradbury, Robert (Psycho) Bloch, Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and Kurt Vonnegut. In-house script writer was Ernest Kinoy, who adapted the master works and contributed occasional storied of his own. Dimension X was a very effective demonstration of what could be done with science fiction on the air. It came so late that nobody cared, but some of the stories stand as classics of the medium. Bradbury's "Mars Is Heaven" is as gripping today as when first heard. His "Martian Chronicles" was one of the series' most impressive offerings. Dimension X played heavily on an "adventures in time and space, told in future tense" theme. Actors who worked regularly on the show included Joe Di Santis, Wendell Holmes, Santos Ortega, Joseph Julian, Jan Miner, Roger De Koven, John Gibson, Ralph Bell, John Larkin, Les Damon, and Mason Adams. It was directed by Fred Weihe and Edward King. The deep-voiced narrator was Norman Rose. The series played heavily on the "X" factor in the title, as did X-Minus One a few years later. The signature was boomed out of and echo chamber as "DIMENSION X X X. Show Notes From OTRR THIS EPISODE: May 20, 1950. NBC network. "The Lost Race". Sustaining. A space ship, marooned on an alien planet, is menaced by a psychotic rocket mechanic. He leads them to discover the terrible secret of the "lost race." Joseph Julian, Matt Crowley, Murray Leinster (author), Roger De Koven, Ernest Kinoy (adaptor), Norman Rose (host), Van Woodward (producer), Edward King (director), Bob Warren (announcer), Harold Huber, Kermit Murdock, Wendell Holmes, Albert Buhrman (music), Bill Chambers (sound engineer). 29:44.

DATE: Sun, 18 Jul 2010
SIZE: 10.4 MB
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CBS Radio Mystery Theater - The Black Room (10-29-74)

The Black Room (Aired October 29, 1974) The CBS Radio Mystery Theater (or CBSRMT) was an ambitious and sustained attempt to revive the great drama of old-time radio in the 1970s. Created by Himan Brown (who had by then become a radio legend due to his work on Inner Sanctum Mysteries and other shows dating back to the 1930s), and aired on affiliate stations across the CBS Radio network, the series began its long run on January 6, 1974. The final episode ran on December 31, 1982. The show was broadcast nightly and ran for one hour, including commercials. Typically, a week consisted of three to four new episodes, with the remainder of the week filled out with reruns. There were a total of 1399 original episodes broadcast. The total number of broadcasts, including reruns, was 2969. The late E.G. Marshall hosted the program every year but the final one, when actress Tammy Grimes took over. Each episode began with the ominous sound of a creaking door, slowly opening to invite listeners in for the evening's adventure. At the end of each show, the door would swing shut, with Marshall signing off, "Until next time, pleasant...dreams?" THIS EPISODE: The CBS Radio Mystery Theater. October 29, 1974. Program #163. CBS network. "The Black Room". Sponsored by: Budweiser, Buick. E. G. Marshall (host), Larry Haines, George Petrie, Peter Collins, Elspeth Eric (writer). 52 minutes.

DATE: Sat, 17 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.57 MB
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Author's Playhouse - My Friend Merton (05-21-45)

My Friend Merton (Aired May 21, 1945) Author's Playhouse was an anthology radio drama series, created by Wynn Wright, that aired on the NBC Blue Network from March 5, 1941 until October 1941. It then moved to the NBC Red Network where it was heard until June 4, 1945. Philip Morris was the sponsor in 1942-43. Premiering with "Elementals" by Stephen Vincent Benét, the series featured adaptations of stories by famous authors, such as “Mr. Mergenthwirker’s Lobbies” by Nelson Bond, "The Snow Goose" by Paul Gallico, "The Monkey's Paw" by W.W. Jacobs, "The Piano" by William Saroyan and "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" by James Thurber. Cast members included Curley Bradley, John Hodiak, Marvin Miller, Nelson Olmsted, Fern Persons, Olan Soule and Les Tremayne. Orchestra conductors for the program were Joseph Gallicchio, Rex Maupin and Roy Shield. Directors included Norman Felton, Homer Heck and Fred Weihe. The series was a precursor to several NBC radio programs of the late 1940s and early 1950s: The World's Great Novels, NBC Presents: Short Story and The NBC University Theater. THIS EPISODE: May 21, 1945. NBC network, Chicago origination. "My Friend Merton". Sustaining. A funny story about a bank robber on the lam and his deceased friend. Albert Crews (director), Arthur Hern, Clarence Hartzell, Elwyn Owen (organist), Guy De Vry (adaptor), Herb Butterfield, Julius Fass (author), Michael Romano, Norman Gottschalk, William Bigley, William Everett. 29:30.

DATE: Sat, 17 Jul 2010
SIZE: 10.1 MB
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Your Hit Parade - I Love You Frank Sinatra (05-06-44)

I Love You Frank Sinatra (Aired May 6, 1944) The origins of the format can be traced back to the Lucky Strike Dance Orchestra (aka Lucky Strike Orchestra), which aired on NBC from 1928 to 1931, sponsored by Lucky Strike cigarettes. Led by Benjamin A. Rolfe, The Lucky Strike Dance Hour was heard on the NBC network for an hour at 10pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. The program introduced the slogan, "Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet." In a cross-promotion, Rolfe made recordings for Edison Records as B.A. Rolfe and his Lucky Strike Orchestra. Jules Stein's Music Corporation of America was the exclusive supplier of bands for The Lucky Strike Dance Hour, which featured George Olsen and His Orchestra with the comedy of Bert Lahr in the summer of 1933. When Your Hit Parade began on NBC April 20, 1935, it was a 60-minute program with 15 songs played in a random format. Initially, the songs were more important than the singers, so a stable of vocalists went uncredited and were paid only $100 per program. In 1936-37, it was carried on both NBC and CBS. Script continuity in the late 1930s and early 1940s was written by Alan Jay Lerner before he found fame as a lyricist. Some years passed before the countdown format was introduced, with the number of songs varying from seven to 15. Vocalists in the 1930s included Buddy Clark, Lanny Ross, Kay Thompson and Bea Wain (1939-44), who was married to the show's announcer, French-born André Baruch. Frank Sinatra joined the show in 1943 and stayed until 1945, returning (1946-49) to co-star with Doris Day. Hugely popular on CBS through the WWII years, Your Hit Parade returned to NBC in 1947. THIS EPISODE: May 6, 1944. "I Love You Frank Sinatra" - CBS network. Sponsored by: Lucky Strike. 9:00 P. M. (EWT). Frank Sinatra sings the first tune (in 9th position), "Poinciana." The commercials are based on the Kentucky Derby. Frank Sinatra, Mark Warnow and His Orchestra, Lyn Murray (conductor), The Hit Paraders, L. A. Speed Riggs (tobacco auctioneer), F. E. Boone (tobacco auctioneer), Basil Ruysdael (commercial spokesman), Kenny Delmar (announcer), Del Sharbutt (announcer), Joan Edwards. 44:31.

DATE: Fri, 16 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.96 MB
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The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe - The Fox's Tail (05-23-50)

The Fox's Tail (Aired May 23, 1950) This revival of Philip Marlowe was more favorably received, probably because of a combination of writing and acting. No one could duplicate the writing of Raymond Chandler, but this group of writers was very good. While Chandler's distinctive similes were largely lacking, the strong dry, sarcastic narration was there, and the way Gerald Mohr delivered the lines had a way of making you forget that they weren't written by Chandler. Mr. Mohr seemed born for the part of the cynical detective. His voice and timing were perfect for the character. In a letter to Gene Levitt, one of the show's writers, Raymond Chandler commented that a voice like Gerald Mohr's at least packed personality; a decided an improvement over his opinion of the original show. By 1949 the show had the largest audience in radio. CBS capitalized on the popularity of Philip Marlowe to introduce a look-alike show a few months later, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar. During the period both shows were broadcast, Johnny Dollar played second fiddle to the popular Philip Marlowe. Even after Marlowe went off the air in 1951, Dollar remained an average detective show. That was to end Oct 3, 1955 when Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar changed everything; the writers, the format to 15 minutes and the lead actor. The new 15 minute episodes staring Bob Bailey dominated detective/mystery drama from then until its last broadcast, September 30, 1962. That date and that broadcast are generally considered as the last of the radio drama broadcasts. THIS EPISODE: May 23, 1950. "The Fox's Tail" - CBS network. Sustaining. Max has evidence against Shepard (the gangster), but he doesn't live to deliver it. Gerald Mohr, Parley Baer, Georgia Ellis, Raymond Chandler (creator), Roy Rowan (announcer), Norman Macdonnell (producer, director), Robert Mitchell (writer), Gene Levitt (writer), Howard McNear, Lou Krugman, Rick Vallin, Hugh Thomas, Richard Aurandt (composer, conductor). 28:48.

DATE: Fri, 16 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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The Adventures Of Leonidas Witherall - Square Nazi Jackboot (06-04-44)

Square Nazi Jackboot (Aired June 4, 1944) Based on the novels of Phoebe Atwood Taylor (writing as Alice Tilton), the 30-minute dramas were produced by Roger Bower and starred Walter Hampden as Leonidas Witherall, a New England boys' school instructor in Dalton, Massachusetts, a fictional Boston suburb. Witherall, who resembled William Shakespeare, is an amateur detective and the accomplished author of the "popular Lieutenant Hazeltine stories." His housekeeper Mrs. Mollett, who in the novels is constantly offering her "candied opinion", was played by Ethel Remey (1895-1979) and Agnes Moorehead[1] and Jack MacBryde appeared as Police Sgt. McCloud. The announcer was Carl Caruso. Milton Kane supplied the music. The series began June 4, 1944 and continued until May 6, 1945. THIS EPISODE: June 4, 1944. "Square Nazi Jackboot" - Mutual network. Sustaining. The first show of the series on Mutual. Walter Hampden gives a short talk at the start of the show, explaining the characters in this detective series. A dead man is occupying Leonidas' closet during an afternoon tea. It turns out the Nazis are at work! Walter Hampden, Howard Merrill (writer), Roger Bower (producer). 29:32.

DATE: Fri, 16 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.28 MB
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The Amazing Mr. Malone - The Dude (1950)

The Dude (1950) Based on Craig Rice’s (a female crime novelist who rivaled Agatha Christie in book sales) novels of crime drama, Frank Lovejoy (and later Gene Raymond and George Petrie) plays “fiction’s most famous criminal lawyer,” John J. Malone. Mr. Malone is our amazing hero, a Chicago lawyer whose bar is more famous than Cheers. His hobby is collecting clichés, and each weeks show is based off of one: cleanliness is next to Godliness, a strong offense is the best defense, seek and ye shall find, and so on. Stories are gripping, from tales of Chicago’s biggest operator who runs a nightclub and his right hand man, to a man looking for trouble in a hotel and finds it in room 419, to a story of a man who owns the most luscious gambling joint this side of Vegas. So brush up on your one liners, and grab your gun, because you’ll want to tune in for this exciting half hour of mystery!

DATE: Fri, 16 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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Inspector Thorne - The Society Writer Murder Case (09-27-51)

The Society Writer Murder Case (Aired September 27, 1951) By the 1940's, Frank and Ann Hummert controlled four and a half hours of national weekday broadcast schedules. Their features reportedly spawned more that 5 million pieces of correspondence annually from steadfast fans. Simultaneously they brought in more than half of the national radio chain's advertising revenues generated during the daylight hours. The couple broadcast 18 quarter-hour serials five times weekly, a total of 90 original episodes for 52 weeks per year, with none of those ever repeated. Some shows were "Amanda of Honeymoon Hill", "Backstage Wife","Chaplin Jim USA", "David Harum", "Easy Aces", "Front Page Farrell", "John's Other Wife", "Just Plain Bill", "The Life of Mary Sothern","Lora Lawton", "Lorenzo Jones", "Ma Perkins", "Mrs Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch", "Our Gal Sunday", "The Romance of Helen Trent" and "Young Widder Brown". THIS EPISODE: September 27, 1951. NBC network. "The Society Writer Murder Case". Sustaining. Christopher Hudson has been shot and killed. Why cannot his biographies be found? The last show of the series. Staats Cotsworth, Edward Slattery (director), Frank Hummert (creator), Anne Hummert (creator), Fred Collins (announcer), Geraldine Merkin (writer). 29:31.

DATE: Thu, 15 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.21 MB
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Gangbusters - Blackie Thompson (Aired December 8, 1945)

Blackie Thompson (12-08-45) Gang Busters was an American dramatic radio program heralded as "the only national program that brings you authentic police case histories." It premiered as G-Men, sponsored by Chevrolet, on July 20, 1935. After the title was changed to Gang Busters January 15, 1936, the show had a 21-year run through November 20, 1957. Beginning with a barrage of loud sound effects — guns firing and tires squealing — this intrusive introduction led to the popular catch phrase "came on like Gang Busters."The series dramatized FBI cases, which producer-director Phillips H. Lord arranged in close association with Bureau director J. Edgar Hoover. Hoover insisted that only closed cases would be used. The initial series was on NBC Radio from July 20 - October 12, 1935. It then aired on CBS from January 15, 1936 to June 15, 1940, sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive and Cue magazine. From October 11, 1940 to December 25, 1948, it was heard on the Blue Network, with various sponsors that included Sloan's Liniment, Waterman pens and Tide. Returning to CBS on January 8, 1949, it ran until June 25, 1955, sponsored by Grape-Nuts and Wrigley's chewing gum. The final series was on the Mutual Broadcasting System from October 5, 1955 to November 27, 1957. It was once narrated by Norman Schwarzkopf, Sr., former head of the New Jersey State Police. The radio series was adapted for DC Comics, Big Little Books and a 1942 movie serial. The 1952 Gang Busters TV series was reedited into two feature films, Gang Busters (1954) and Guns Don't Argue (1957). THIS EPISODE: December 8, 1945. Program #411. ABC network origination, WRVR-FM, New York rebroadcast. "The Case Of Blackie Thompson". Participating sponsors. The story of bank-robber Blackie Thompson, and his all-too-loyal girlfriend, Lila. WRVR rebroadcast date: May 16, 1974. The script was used previously on Gangbusters of February 24, 1940. Phillips H. Lord (producer). 30:58.

DATE: Thu, 15 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.47 MB
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The Alan Young Show - Photo Of A Bank Robbery (Aired February 7, 1947)

Photo Of A Bank Robbery (02-07-47) Young was featured in the film Chicken Every Sunday in 1949, and the television version of The Alan Young Show began the following year. After its cancellation, Young appeared in films, including Androcles and the Lion (1952) and The Time Machine (1960). He appeared in the episode "Thin Ice" of the NBC espionage drama Five Fingers, starring David Hedison. He is best known, however, for Mister Ed, a CBS television show which ran from 1961 to 1966. He played the owner of a talking horse that would talk to no one but him. Young's television guest appearances include The Love Boat, Murder, She Wrote, St. Elsewhere, Coach, Party of Five, The Wayans Bros., Sabrina, the Teenage Witch (Episode: "Sweet Charity", playing Zelda's older love interest), USA High, Hang Time, ER and Maybe It's Me. In 1993, Young recreated his role as Filby for the mini-sequel to George Pal's The Time Machine, reuniting him with Rod Taylor, who played George, the Time Traveller. It was called Time Machine: The Journey Back, directed by Clyde Lucas. In 2002, he had a cameo as the flower store worker in Simon Wells' remake of The Time Machine. Finally, in 2010, he read H. G. Wells's original novel for 7th Voyage Productions, Inc. In 1994, Young co-starred in the Eddie Murphy film Beverly Hills Cop III. He played the role of Uncle Dave Thornton, the Walt Disney-esque founder of the fictional California theme park Wonderworld. THIS EPISODE: February 7, 1947. "Photo Of A Bank Robbery" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Ipana, Minit-Rub, Vitalis. West Coast broadcast. Alan takes a photo of a trio of bank robbers. Veola Vonn, Jean Vander Pyl, Dick Lane, Jim Backus, Al Schwartz (writer), Sherwood Schwartz (writer), Alan Young, Hans Conried. 30:29.

DATE: Thu, 15 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.14 MB
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The Adventures Of Frank Race - Brooklyn Accent (10-30-49)

Brooklyn Accent (Aired October 25, 1949) The Adventures of Frank Race was an American radio adventure serial syndicated by Bruce Eells Productions. The 30-minute program's first East Coast broadcast was 1949, and the show ran 43 episodes. Because it was syndicated, it aired on different stations on different days. For instance, in New York City, the first episode ran on WINS on April 9, 1949. The series was broadcast on the West Coast from 1951-52. Each episode opened with a one-minute organ theme and then the following from announcer Art Gilmore: "Many things were changed during the war; the face of the earth was altered and the people of the Earth changed. Before the war, Frank Race was an attorney, but he traded his law books for the cloak-and-dagger of the OSS. When it was over, his former life was over, too... adventure had become his business! " Frank Race mainly investigated international insurance scams around the globe in various exotic locations, making him something of a cross between James Bond and Johnny Dollar. After Tom Collins played the title role for the first 22 episodes, Paul Dubov took over the lead role. Tony Barnett portrayed Race's sidekick, Mark Donovan. Other actors included Jack Kruschen, Wilms Herbert, Lillian Buyeff and Harry Lang. The series was written and directed by Joel Murcott and Buckley Angel. Ivan Ditmars provided the background organ music. THIS EPISODE: October 25, 1949. Program #26. Broadcasters Program Syndicate syndication. "Brooklyn Accent". Commercials added locally. Race is in the South, trying to find William Beading to give him $20,000. A gambling ship and burnt pies lead to murder. The date and program number are subject to correction. Paul Dubov, Tony Barrett, Buckley Angel (writer, director), Joel Murcott (writer, director), Bruce Eells (producer), Ivan Ditmars (organist), Art Gilmore (announcer), Frank Lovejoy, Wilms Herbert, Lillian Buyeff, William Johnstone, Michael Ann Barrett. 26:46.

DATE: Wed, 14 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.29 MB
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The Whistler - Malice (10-11-42)

Malice (Aired October 11, 1942) Bill Forman had the title role of host and narrator. Others who portrayed the Whistler at various times were Gale Gordon, Joseph Kearns, Marvin Miller (announcer for The Whistler and The Bickersons and later as Michael Anthony on TV's The Millionaire), Bill Johnstone (who had the title role on radio's The Shadow from 1938 to 1943) and Everett Clarke. Cast members included Hans Conried, Joseph Kearns, Cathy Lewis, Elliott Lewis, Gerald Mohr, Lurene Tuttle and Jack Webb. Writer-producer J. Donald Wilson established the tone of the show during its first two years, and he was followed in 1944 by producer-director George Allen. Other directors included Sterling Tracy and Sherman Marks with final scripts by Joel Malone and Harold Swanton. Of the 692 episodes, over 200 no longer exist. In 1946, a local Chicago version of The Whistler with local actors aired Sundays on WBBM, sponsored by Meister Brau beer. THIS EPISODE: October 11, 1942. CBS network. "Malice". Sustaining. A wealthy doctor and his two sons, one wants to be a doctor; the other definitely doesn't, meet up with a girl from the wrong side of the tracks. Wilbur Hatch (composer, conductor), J. Donald Wilson (writer, director). 29:37.

DATE: Wed, 14 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.89 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Dr Sixgun" - Ringo Kane Gunfighter (11-21-54)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Dr Sixgun" - Ringo Kane Gunfighter (Aired November 21, 1954) Doctor Six Gun Karl Weber as Dr. Ray Matson, "the gun toting frontier doctor who roamed the length and breadth of the old Indian territory,friend and physician to white man and Indian alike, the symbol of justice and mercy in the lawless west of the 1870s. This legendary figure was known to all as Dr. Sixgun." Bill Griffis as Pablo, the doctor's tipsy sidekick, who told the stories. The Preceding was taken from "The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio" THIS EPISODE: November 21, 1954. "Ringo Kane Gunfighter" - Program #13. NBC network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. Ringo Kane kills a retired gun fighter in a rigged duel. The gun fighter's young son swears revenge. Ernest Kinoy (writer), Fred Weihe (director, transcriber), George Lefferts (writer), Karl Weber, William Griffis. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Wed, 14 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.57 MB
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Lights Out - Protective Mr. Drogen (01-26-43)

Protective Mr. Drogen (Aired January 26, 1943) Lights Out, featuring "tales of the supernatural and the supernormal", was created in Chicago by writer Wyllis Cooper in 1934, and the first series of shows (each 15 minutes long) ran on a local NBC station, WENR. By April 1934, the series was expanded to a half hour in length and moved to midnight Wednesdays. In January 1935, the show was discontinued in order to ease Cooper's workload (he was then writing scripts for the network's prestigious Immortal Dramas program), but was brought back by huge popular demand a few weeks later. After a successful tryout in New York City, the series was picked up by NBC in April 1935 and broadcast nationally, usually late at night and always on Wednesdays. Cooper stayed on the program until June 1936, when another Chicago writer, Arch Oboler, took over. By the time Cooper left, the series had inspired about 600 fan clubs. Cooper's run was characterized by grisly stories spiked with dark, tongue-in-cheek humor, a sort of radio Grand Guignol. A character might be buried or eaten or skinned alive, vaporized in a ladle of white-hot steel, absorbed by a giant slurping amoeba, have his arm torn off by a robot, tortured or decapitated -- always with the appropriate blood-curdling acting and sound effects. THIS EPISODE: January 26, 1943. CBS network. "The Projective Mr. Drogan". Sponsored by: Ironized Yeast, Molle Shaving Cream. A man finds that he can work miracles, and starts to plan world conquest. The story was re-issued as, "Big Mr. Little." This is a network, sponsored version. Arch Oboler (writer, host), Bob Stevenson (announcer), Edgar Barrier. 29:35.

DATE: Tue, 13 Jul 2010
SIZE: 7.07 MB
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Let George Do It - The Spirit World (05-10-48)

The Spirit World (Aired May 10, 1948) Let George Do It was a radio drama series produced by Owen and Pauline Vinson from 1946 to 1954. It starred Bob Bailey as detective-for-hire George Valentine (with Olan Soule stepping into the role in 1954). Clients came to Valentine's office after reading a newspaper carrying his classified ad: "Personal notice: Danger's my stock in trade. If the job's too tough for you to handle, you've got a job for me. George Valentine." Valentine's secretary was Claire Brooks, aka Brooksie (Frances Robinson, Virginia Gregg, Lillian Buyeff). As Valentine made his rounds in search of the bad guys, he usually encounted Brooksie's kid brother, Sonny (Eddie Firestone), Lieutenant Riley (Wally Maher) and elevator man Caleb (Joseph Kearns). Sponsored by Standard Oil, the program was broadcast on the West Coast Mutual Broadcasting System from October 18, 1946 to September 27, 1954, first on Friday evenings and then on Mondays. In its last season, transcriptions were aired in New York, Wednesdays at 9:30pm, from January 20, 1954 to January 12, 1955. John Hiestand was the program's announcer. Don Clark directed the scripts by David Victor and Jackson Gillis. The background music was supplied by Eddie Dunstedter on the organ. THIS EPISODE: May 10, 1948. "The Spirit World" - Mutual-Don Lee network. Sponsored by: Standard Oil, Chevron. George tackles a phoney medium to save Gabrielle Turner from a charge of murder, and gets a ghost to trap the real killer! Bob Bailey, Frances Robinson, Wally Maher, John Morrison, Irene Tedrow, Sarah Selby, Jeanne Bates, Lol Chan Meara (?), Morton Fine (writer), Don Clark (director), Eddie Dunstedter (composer, conductor), Bud Hiestand (announcer). 29:31.

DATE: Tue, 13 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.45 MB
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The Mayor Of The Town - Finding Mary Meyer (02-17-43)

Finding Mary Meyer (Aired February 17, 1943) An NBC offering. Aired on Sundays from 7:00PM to 7:30PM, starring Lional Barrymore and Agnes Moorehead. The creator and writer was Jean Holloway, the announcer Harlow Wilcox, music by Gordon Jenkins and sponsored by Rinso detergent. The show was a perfect vehicle for Lionel Barrymore: rich with warmhearted humor, and good-natured grumbling, its "mayor" had a fierce bark but a mushy heart when confronted with the plight of an orphan or a stray dog. The mayor cared little about political advantage: he even found time, once a year, to turn the town of Springdale into a special theater, to give his traditional performance as Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol. THE CAST: Lionel Barrymore as the mayor of the town of Springdale. Agnes Moorehead as Marilly, his housekeeper. Conrad Binyon as the mayor's ward, Butch. Gloria McMillan as Sharlee Bronson, Butch's best girl. Priscilla Lyon as Holly-Ann, the mayor's granddaughter. Also: Will Wright, Sharon Douglas, Irvin Lee, Marjorie Davies, and other Hollywood actors. Producer: Murray Bolen; later Knowles Entrikin. Director: Jack Van Nostrand. Writers: Jean Holloway, Leonard St. Clair, Howard Blake, Erna Lazarus, etc.; Howard Breslin and Charles Tazewell wrote alternate weeks, ca. 1945. Orchestra:. Gordon Jenkins (ca. 1943); Bernard Katz (1945); Frank Worth. Sound Effects: David Light, Mary Ann Gideon.

DATE: Tue, 13 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.15 MB
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I Was A Communist For FBI - An Un-American Activity (05-06-53)

An Un-American Activity (Aired May 6, 1953) I Was a Communist for the FBI was an American espionage thriller radio series with 78 episodes syndicated by Ziv to more than 600 stations in 1952-54. Made without FBI cooperation, the series was adapted from the book by undercover agent Matt Cvetic, who was portrayed by Dana Andrews.The series was crafted to warn people about the threat of Communist subversion of American society. The tone of the show is very jingoistic and ultra-patriotic. Communists are evil incarnate and the FBI can do no wrong. As a relic of the Joe McCarthy era, this show is a time capsule of American society during the Second Red Scare. THIS EPISODE: May 6, 1953. Program #55. ZIV Syndication. "An Un-American Activity". Commercials added locally. "The Party" is planning an attack against the House Un-American Activities Committee. The date is subject to correction. Dana Andrews, Truman Bradley (announcer). 27:24.

DATE: Mon, 12 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.66 MB
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The Hallmark Playhouse - So Big (02-24-49)

So Big (Aired February 24, 1949) The Hallmark Playhouse was heard over CBS stations Thursday evenings. This drama anthology of 30-minute shows was sponsored by, of course, Hallmark Greeting Cards. It was preceded by the Radio Reader's Digest, which ran from September 13, 1942 thorugh June 3, 1948. Hallmark sponsored the Radio Reader's Digest from January 13, 1946 to it's end. On Feb. 8, 1953, the series name and format was changed. It was now called the Hallmark Hall Of Fameand presented biographal sketches of famous persons, past and present. The new format was used until the end of the 1955 season. The exception to the new format was the broadcast each Christmas season of "A Christmas Carol". Like other dramatic series of this time, this one made use of major screen actors in the productions. James Hilton, author of "Random Harvest", "Lost Horizon" and "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" plus others, served as host and Narrator. Dee Engelbach produced and directed the shows. Jean Holloway was the writer. Sound Effects were by Harry Essman and Gene Twombly. Musical conductor was Lyn Murray. The show's theme was "Dream of Olwne" by Charles Williams. THIS EPISODE: February 24, 1949. CBS network. "So Big". Sponsored by: Hallmark Cards. A woman's life on the farms of the Midwest during the last century. Edna Ferber (writer), Virginia Bruce, Jeff Chandler, Howard McNear, James Hilton (host). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Mon, 12 Jul 2010
SIZE: 8.60 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western - The Fastest Gun Alive (07-12-56) Pt.2 of 2 COMPLETE

Boxcars711 Overnight Western - The Fastest Gun Alive (Released July 12, 1956) Pt.2 of 2 COMPLETE The image of the western gunfighter has been indelibly etched by the likes of John Wayne in the forties and Clint Eastwood in the sixties as a supremely confident and capable shootist. It is rare for Hollywood to buck this trend but in THE FASTEST GUN ALIVE director Robert Rouse peels away the layers that all too often separate celluloid fiction from brute fact. The climactic showdown is the cracklingly effective sort of western legend that has been all too often obscured by the fake glories of the movie cowboy. Glen Ford is a movie cowboy here too, but he makes you think that just maybe this is the way that shootouts at high noon must have been like. This gem is rarely seen except on cable. Catch it and see how a small part of the west was won.

DATE: Mon, 12 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.80 MB
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The Shadow - The Mark Of The Black Widow (10-27-40)

One of the most popular radio shows in history. The show went on the air in August of 1930. "Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows!" The opening lines of the "Detective Story" program captivated listeners and are instantly recognizable even today. Originally the narrator of the series of macabre tales, the eerie voice known as The Shadow became so popular to listeners that "Detective Story" was soon renamed "The Shadow," and the narrator became the star of the old-time mystery radio series, which ran until 1954. A figure never seen, only heard, the Shadow was an invincible crime fighter. He possessed many gifts which enabled him to overcome any enemy. Besides his tremendous strength, he could defy gravity, speak any language, unravel any code, and become invisible with his famous ability to "cloud men's minds." Along with his team of operatives, the Shadow battled adversaries with chilling names like The Black Master, Kings of Crime, The Five Chameleons, and, of course, The Red Menace. The Shadow's exploits were also avidly followed by readers in The Shadow magazine, which began in 1931 following the huge success of the old-time mystery radio program. The magazine was published by Street & Smith, who had also sponsored the old-time mystery radio program. Over the course of 18 years, Street & Smith published 325 issues of The Shadow, each one containing a novel about the sinister crime fighter. These stories were written by Maxwell Grant, a fictional name created by the publishing company. Although several different people wrote under the pseudonym, Walter B. Gibson wrote most of the stories, 282 in all. Most of the novels published have been reprinted in paperback and The Shadow adventures remain popular today, with Shadow comic books, magazines, toys, games, cds and cassettes of old-time radio shows, and books bringing top dollar among collectors the world over. THIS EPISODE: October 27, 1940. Mutual network. "The Mark Of The Black Widow". Sponsored by: Blue Coal. The "Black Widow" is just a drawing of a spider from ancient Egypt. However, it's just as deadly as a the real thing! The system cue has been deleted. William Johnstone, Marjorie Anderson, Ken Roberts (announcer), Jerry Devine (writer), Kenny Delmar, Everett Sloane, Arthur Vinton. 29:10.

DATE: Sun, 11 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.84 MB
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In The Name Of The Law - I Dreamed Mother Was Poisoned (06-14-36)

I Dreamed Mother Was Poisoned (Aired June 14, 1936) In the Name of the Law was a True Crime radio show from 1936. It says "In the name of the law, we bring you another of the thrilling stories in this exciting series, taken from actual police case files. Little else is known about this show at this time. THIS EPISODE: June 14, 1936 "I Dreamed Mother Was Poisoned" - A woman in Texas dreams that her mother has died. When she drags her daughter and son-in-law to visit her, Mom turns out to be just fine. She says that she's "not ready to die," whereupon she does! Ken Christy. 26:27.

DATE: Sun, 11 Jul 2010
SIZE: 8.51 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western - The Fastest Gun Alive (07-12-56) Pt.1 of 2

Boxcars711 Overnight Western - The Fastest Gun Alive (Released July 12, 1956) Pt.1 of 2 The Fastest Gun Alive is a 1956 western film starring Glenn Ford, Jeanne Crain and Broderick Crawford. Notorious gunslinger George Kelby Jr. (Glenn Ford) and his wife Dora (Jeanne Crain) settle down in a peaceful little town under assumed identities to avoid having to continually face men out to become famous for shooting down the "fastest gun alive". George becomes a mild-mannered tea-totaling shopkeeper little respected by the other townsfolk. One day, the whole town hears the news that outlaw Vinnie Harold (Broderick Crawford) has gunned down Clint Fallon, reputedly the fastest gun in the west. George's pride is stung. Eventually, he becomes so frustrated, he gets drunk and blurts out his secret. When the citizens disbelieve him, he gives them a demonstration of his skill. Harold finds out and, backed up by fellow bank robbers Taylor Swope (John Dehner) and Dink Wells (Noah Beery, Jr.), threatens to burn down the whole town unless George faces him. With no other choice, George outdraws and kills Harold. When a posse pursuing the outlaws shows up, the townspeople claim that the two men shot each other dead, allowing George and Dora to resume their peaceful existence. Demonstrating his prowess with a gun, the Glenn Ford character asks a citizen to hold a glass of beer away from his body and, upon the count of three, let it drop. He shoots it before it hits the ground. The scene is shot from behind the glass of beer with Ford facing directly into the camera. Ford's speed in his quick draw is remarkable.

DATE: Sat, 10 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.45 MB
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Bulldog Drummond - Death In The Deep (06-16-48)

Death In The Deep (Aired June 16, 1948) The Bulldog Drummond stories followed Captain Hugh "Bulldog" Drummond, D.S.O., M.C., a wealthy former WWI officer of the fictional Loamshire Regiment, who, after the war, spends his new-found leisure time as a private detective. Drummond is a proto-James Bond figure and a version of the imperial adventurers depicted by the likes of John Buchan. In terms of the detective genre, the first Bulldog Drummond novel was published after the Sherlock Holmes stories, the Nayland Smith/Fu Manchu novels and Richard Hannay's first three adventures including The Thirty-Nine Steps. The character first appeared in the novel Bulldog Drummond (1920), and this was followed by a lengthy series of books and adaptations for films, radio and television. "Drummond... has the appearance of an English gentleman: a man who fights hard, plays hard and lives clean... His best friend would not call him good-looking but he possess that cheerful type of ugliness which inspires immediate confidence ... Only his eyes redeem his face. Deep-set and steady, with eyelashes that many women envy, they show him to be a sportsman and an adventurer. Drummond goes outside the law when he feels the ends justify the means." The opening of the radio show starts with a the sounds of footsteps, foghorn, then two shots ring out, followed by three blows of a police officer's whistle. Bulldog was a methodical crime-solving sleuth who let nothing get in his way of his goal, which was to put a stop to crime! Bulldog believed in uncomplicated and decisive means of getting his way with the lords of the underworld. This usually led to their swift capture, and the easing of the city's burden brought about by these ruthless thugs. THIS EPISODE: June 16, 1948. Program #26. Mutual network origination, Ziv syndication. "Death In The Deep". Commercials added locally. A murderer stalks his prey aboard a yacht in a storm-tossed ocean. Jackson Beck (announcer). 25:48.

DATE: Sat, 10 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.70 MB
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My Friend Irma - Cub Scout Speech (01-13-52)

Cub Scout Speech (Aired January 13, 1952) My Friend Irma, created by writer-director-producer Cy Howard, was a top-rated, long-run radio situation comedy, so popular in the late 1940s that its success escalated to films and television, while Howard scored with another radio comedy hit, Life with Luigi. Dependable and level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis) narrated the misadventures of her innocent and bewildered roommate, Irma Peterson (Marie Wilson), a dim-bulb stenographer. Wilson portrayed the character on radio, in two films and a TV series. The successful radio series with Marie Wilson ran on CBS Radio from April 11, 1947 to August 23, 1954. The TV version, seen on CBS from January 8, 1952 until June 25, 1954, was the first series telecast from the CBS Television City facility in Hollywood. The movie My Friend Irma (1949) starred Marie Wilson and Diana Lynn but is mainly remembered today for introducing Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis to moviegoers, resulting in even more screen time for Martin and Lewis in the sequel, My Friend Irma Goes West (1950). THIS EPISODE: January 13, 1952. "Cub Scout Speech" - CBS network. Sponsored by: Ennds, Eye-Gene. Professor Kropotkin told the immigration authorities that he was married, so he could adopt a boy from Europe. Now he has to come up with a bride! Alan Reed, Carl Caruso (announcer), Cathy Lewis, Cy Howard (writer, producer, director), Fort Pearson (announcer), Gloria Gordon, Hans Conried, John Brown, Lud Gluskin, Marie Wilson, Parke Levy (writer), Pat Burton (associate producer), Stanley Adams (writer). 29:51.

DATE: Fri, 09 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.20 MB
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Secrets Of Scotland Yard - The Kindly Doctor (1944)

The Kindly Doctor (1944) The Secrets of Scotland Yard was an independent production of the Towers of London syndicate in England for world wide distribution. Each week, an audience of anxious radio-listeners tuned in to hear these true crime stories of the London Metropolitan Police unfold, as the detectives at the Yard investigated some of England’s most famous criminals. Their trials have become legendary. Stories presented in the series include the theft of the British crown jewels by Colonel Thomas Blood; the story of a man who finds an armless and legless body wrapped in ribbons and lace; or the strange story of two close brothers who love one another enough to contemplate the murder of a brother’s affluent, yet unsightly and ignorant, wife. Murders, forgery, and robberies all get a through review on the program. Each time, Scotland Yard detectives are afoot to solve the crime mystery! The Secrets of Scotland Yard was initially hosted by Clive Brook, probably for the first year or so. To add to the air of authenticity, Brook sometimes discusses matters with Percy Hoskins, a 1950s crime expert and reporter for the London Daily Express. Hoskins knew every nook and cranny in London’s seedier districts and personally reported on many of the major crimes of the day. A student of crime, Hoskins was also one of the founders of the Saints and Sinners Club of London, an educational organization dedicated to true crime investigation methods and results. Brook had his own Scotland Yard experience previously when he played retired naval commander Stevenson in the 1936 film, "Scotland Yard Commands". American audiences will however probably more familiar with Brooks’ portrayal of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes in the 1932 film of the same name. Brook was eventually replaced by an actor portraying the character Superintendent X of Scotland Yard.

DATE: Fri, 09 Jul 2010
SIZE: 3.98 MB
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Second Chance - First Contestant Is Jack Miliam (06-22-53)

First Contestant Jack Miliam (Aired June 22, 1953) SECOND CHANCE was a quiz show out of New York. HOST: John Leonard "Johnny" Olson (May 22, 1910 – October 12, 1985) an American radio personality and television announcer, most notable for announcing 32 game shows from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions, from the late 1950s through the mid 1980s. You may remember him from the TV show "The Price Is Right" or "Name That Tune". Second Chance starts off "If at first you don't suceed there is always a second chance". The object is to identify a famous personality who has expierenced a second chance in life. Can you identify the person? Olson also announced the Merv Griffin-hosted Play Your Hunch, which lasted until 1963 and began his long association with Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions, five years earlier.Olson continued to announce What's My Line? and To Tell the Truth after both shows moved from CBS to syndication in the late 1960s. His involvement with both of them ended when he was designated announcer of the 1972 revivals of The Price Is Right and I've Got a Secret, both of which were taped in Hollywood, and left New York for the west coast. THIS EPISODE: June 22, 1953. "First Contestant Is Jack Miliam". NBC network. Sustaining. The first show of the series. The first contestant is Jack Milam, who regrets running out on his bride-to-be after proposing marriage. The system cue is added live. Johnny Olson (host), Fred Collins (announcer). 17:23.

DATE: Fri, 09 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.67 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Tales Of The Texas Rangers" - The Devil's Share (12-31-50)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Tales Of The Texas Rangers" - The Devil's Share (Aired December 31, 1950) Tales of the Texas Rangers, a western adventure old-time radio drama, premiered on July 8, 1950, on the US NBC radio network and remained on the air through September 14, 1952. Movie star Joel McCrea starred as Texas Ranger Jayce Pearson, who used the latest scientific techniques to identify the criminals and his faithful horse, Charcoal (or "Charky," as Jayce would sometimes refer to him), to track them down. The shows were reenactments of actual Texas Ranger cases. The series was produced and directed by Stacy Keach, Sr., and was sponsored for part of its run by Wheaties. Captain Manuel T. "Lone Wolf" Gonzaullas, a Ranger for 30 years and who was said to have killed 31 men during his career, served as consultant for the series. The series was adapted for television from 1955 to 1957 and produced by Screen Gems. For the TV version, Willard Parker took over the role of Jace Pearson. On radio, Pearson often worked by request with a local sheriff's office or police department but on the TV show, he had a regular partner, Ranger Clay Morgan (who had been an occasional character on the radio show), played by Harry Lauter. During the opening and closing credits of the TV show, the actors would march toward the camera and sing the theme song, "These Are Tales of Texas Rangers", to the tune of "The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You", which is also the tune of "I've Been Working on the Railroad". The radio series used contemporary cases and modern detective methods to solve crimes; it was a procedural drama, in many ways Dragnet with a Western flavor. The TV show was aimed at kids (and aired on Saturday mornings) and was more of a traditional Western (with chases and shoot-outs). The TV series did both modern cases and cases set in the "Old West." With new cases using a car with horse float to get the rangers to their destinations it always made sure that the use of horses was only a step away. With older themes they would always ride into town on the horses to mete out their justice, they wore differing ranger attire for new and old scenes, also their weaponry was totally different.

DATE: Thu, 08 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.26 MB
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Quiet Please - A Time To Be Born & A Time To Die (03-27-49)

A Time To Be Born & A Time To Die (Aired March 27, 1949) Quiet, Please was produced at WOR in New York City, and began on the Mutual Network on June 8, 1947. Beginning in September, 1948, it was syndicated by ABC, though CBS executive Davidson Taylor expressed an interest in the show, writing in a memo in March 1948, "I like this show a lot and believe we could get it if we wanted." (Hand, 146) Each episode began with Chappell intoning the show's title, followed by a long pause (sometimes up to seven seconds), before repeating the title. Then, the show's theme music was played, a dirgey, funereal organ and piano version of a portion of the second movement of César Franck's 1899 Symphony in D Minor. The introduction established the sparse, understated tone of the show, and has inspired collectors and reviewers to remark upon Cooper's use of the dramatic power of silence. Though the general thrust of the stories were fantasy, horror and suspense, Cooper's Quiet, Please! scripts covered a broad thematic range, including romance, science fiction, crime, family drama and humor (some of it quite self-deprecating). Dunning describes the show as "outstanding dark fantasy;" (Dunning, 559) Hand notes that this description is broadly accurate, but that there are a few humorous or sentimental Quiet, Please episodes which "aren't particularly 'dark'". Hand also suggests that "any attempt to categorize the series feels like diminishing its scope of achievement." (Hand, 145)Regardless of content, most episodes had a dreamlike, surreal quality: Odd or paranormal events were not always explained: Dunning wrote that the show's "characters walked in a fuzzy dream world where the element of menace was ripe and ever present." (Dunning, 559). Hand writes that "Cooper was a master of the opening line. Almost every episode of Quiet, Please begins with a sentence or two that hooks the listener, commanding their attention and their curiosity." (Hand, 147) THIS EPISODE: March 27, 1949. Program #91. ABC network, WJZ, New York aircheck. "A Time To Be Born and A Time To Die". Sustaining. The rise and fall of an ambitious man, the very far fall. Albert Buhrman (music), Athena Lorde, Edgar Stehli, Ernest Chappell, Helen Choate, Joyce Gordon, William J. McClintock (sound), Wyllis Cooper (writer, director). 29:50.

DATE: Thu, 08 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.35 MB
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Future Tense - Cold Equation (05-08-74)

Cold Equation (Aired May 22, 1974) Future Tense was the title given to two short series of shows that aired at various times in 1974 through 1976 on WMUK, college radio station of Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan. The shows were announced as being produced by WMUK Special Projects and used local actors. Professor Eli Segal updated some X Minus One and Dimension X scripts, changing place and time to local area and time, as required. The series used original X Minus One music opening, closing and scene bridges although it didn't use the X Minus One "blast off" sequence. (It did use it at least once as a sound effect). In the first series aired in May of 1974, with the shows broadcast Monday through Thursday (from a comment at the end of one show). From information found, the first series appears to have been repeated in June of 1974 and again in August of of 1976 (from corrections to "Science Fiction on Radio: A Revised Look At 1950-1975", see Log Comments). The second series is believed to have aired in July of 1976 (from the Gold Index, see Log Comments). In 1975, "Pail of Air" was awarded the Ohio State Award for "network quality radio drama". "Cold Equation" won a Peabody Award in 1978 "for championing radio drama". These shows, although not easily found, offer a unique opportunity to compare shows produced in radio's golden age to the same script produced today. If you do, please keep in mind that these shows were done with non-professional actors and production staff. Still, they are well done and are anenjoyable listen, especially "Born of Man And Woman" (my favorite). THIS EPISODE: May 22, 1974. WMUK-FM, Kalamazoo, Michigan. "Cold Equation". Sustaining. A good story without the expected happy ending. A beautiful young girl stows away on a spaceshop and must be killed. The script was used previously on "X Minus One" on August 25, 1955 and subsequently on "Audion Theater" on October 6, 1990. Eli Segal (producer, director), Tom Godwin (author), Peg Small, Tom Small, Mark Spink, John Scott, Richard Niessink. 28:14.

DATE: Thu, 08 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.82 MB
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The Abbott & Costello Show - Merchant Marines (01-25-45)

Merchant Marines (Aired January 25, 1945) The Abbott and Costello Show mixed comedy with musical interludes (usually, by singers such as Connie Haines, Marilyn Maxwell, the Delta Rhythm Boys, Skinnay Ennis, and the Les Baxter Singers). Regulars and semi-regulars on the show included Artie Auerbrook, Elvia Allman, Iris Adrian, Mel Blanc, Wally Brown, Sharon Douglas, Verna Felton, Sidney Fields, Frank Nelson, Martha Wentworth, and Benay Venuta. Ken Niles was the show's longtime announcer, doubling as an exasperated foil to Abbott & Costello's mishaps (and often fuming in character as Costello insulted his on-air wife routinely); he was succeeded by Michael Roy, with annoncing chores also handled over the years by Frank Bingman and Jim Doyle. The show went through several orchestras during its radio life, including those of Ennis, Charles Hoff, Matty Matlock, Jack Meaking, Will Osborne, Freddie Rich, Leith Stevens, and Peter van Steeden. The show's writers included Howard Harris, Hal Fimberg, Parke Levy, Don Prindle, Ed Cherokee, Len Stern, Martin Ragaway, Paul Conlan, and Ed Forman, as well as producer Martin Gosch. Sound effects were handled mostly by Floyd Caton. Abbott and Costello moved the show to ABC (the former NBC Blue Network) five years after they premiered on NBC. During their ABC period they also hosted a 30-minute children's radio program(The Abbott and Costello Children's Show), which aired Saturday mornings with vocalist Anna Mae Slaughter and announcer Johnny McGovern. THIS EPISODE: January 25, 1945. Program #15. NBC network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. A funny show as Costello tries to join the Merchant Marines. AFRS program name: "Comedy Replacement." Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Freddie Rich and His Orchestra, Connie Haines, Artie Auerbach (Mr. Kitzel). 1/2 hour.

DATE: Wed, 07 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.93 MB
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Beyond Midnight - Little Happenthatch (05-23-69)

Little Happenthatch (Aired May 23, 1969) Let us journey “into the land that lies beyond midnight,” into a world of ghost hunters, men going mad, and DEATH DEATH DEATH! Written by the masterful Michael McCabe, these well-done radio shows will capture your attention and keep you up listening to them well beyond midnight. A replacement series for SF 68, this South African horror anthology was far more successful than its predecessor, running from 1968 through 1969. Its success may have been due in part to producer Michael McCabe - who also produced SF 68 - honing his talents to a higher degree. Little else is known about it, including the number of shows produced. As far as I can discover, there were at least 43 episodes, all in half-hour format.

DATE: Wed, 07 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.73 MB
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Pat Novak For Hire - The Jack Of Clubs (02-20-49)

The Jack Of Clubs (Aired February 20, 1949) Pat Novak, played by Jack Webb, was a private detective working out of Pier 19, a waterfront office in San Francisco. The stories were always very similar: Someone would hire him, (if not a beautiful woman, the job would lead to a beautiful woman) someone would get murdered, he would investigate the case, get beaten up by the thugs, and then the case would be solved and end with glorious violence. The closing was always the same; the listener would be told who had done what, to whom and why they had done it. THIS EPISODE: February 20, 1949. "The Jack Of Clubs" - ABC network. Sustaining. The second show of the second series with Jack Webb. $1000 mysteriously finds its way into Pat's bank account, a corpse finds its way into Pat's closet, a lovely lady and smuggled microfilm find their way into Pat's life. The system cue has been deleted. Jack Webb, Raymond Burr, Herb Butterfield, Betty Lou Gerson, Vic Perrin, Ted de Corsia, Basil Adlam (composer, conductor), Tudor Owen, George Fenneman (announcer). 29:39.

DATE: Tue, 06 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.72 MB
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The Haunting Hour - Ptolomey's Grave (1945)

Ptolomey's Grave (1945) The shows are classic chills from the old school, with creepy organ, overwrought women and over the top men. Perhaps not the highest of melodrama, but obsessively workmanlike. After all, they might have known they were a skeleton staff toiling relentlessly without a ghost of a chance of fame. Thanks to transcription, these unknowns are still with us. John Dunning, succinctly states in "On the Air, The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio," "There were no credits, so casts and production crews are unknown." THIS EPISODE: 1945. Program #8. NBC syndication. "Ptolemy's Grave". Commercials added locally. The widow of a man killed by a mummy's curse is afraid that she's next. The date is approximate. 28:06.

DATE: Tue, 06 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.84 MB
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Mr. Keen Tracer Of Lost Persons - Mr. Trevor's Secret (02-17-44)

Mr. Trevor's Secret (Aired February 17, 1944) When Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons first debuted over the Blue Network on October 12, 1937, the show’s title accurately described Keen’s stock-in-trade; the “kindly old investigator” tracked down individuals who had mysteriously vanished, leaving behind their families, homes, jobs and other day-to-day activities. Keen (he never had a first name, unless it was “Peachy”) was assisted in these duties by an Irishman named Mike Clancy. Mike wasn’t much of a brainiac (the quote that comprises the title of this post was a semi-catchphrase that he seemed to use on the show every week) but he could use the necessary brawn when the situation called for it. Bennett Kilpack played kindly ol' Keen throughout most of the program’s run, as well as Philip Clarke and Arthur Hughes, while Jim Kelly took the role of Clancy. The series originally aired as a thrice-weekly fifteen-minute serial from 1937-43 (the show moved to CBS in 1942), providing more than ample time for Keen to solve even the most baffling of disappearances. Beginning November 11, 1943, the program changed its format to that of a half-hour weekly offering—and though the title and theme song remained, Keen branched out into investigating murders. THIS EPISODE: February 17, 1944. CBS network. "Mr. Trevor's Secret". Sponsored by: Anacin, Kolynos, Heet, Kriptin, Bisodol, Hills Cold Tabs, Aerowax. A valuable chemical engineer has disappeared from a defense plant, seriously harming the war effort. Frank Hummert (author), Anne Hummert (author), Bennett Kilpack, Larry Elliott (announcer). 30:02.

DATE: Tue, 06 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.54 MB
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Fort Laramie - A Small Beginning (09-30-56)

A Small Beginning (Aired September 30, 1956) Fort Laramie opened with "Specially transcribed tales of the dark and tragic ground of the wild frontier. The saga of fighting men who rode the rim of empire and the dramatic story of Lee Quince, Captain of Cavalry". When Norman Macdonnell created Fort Laramie in late 1955, he made it clear to his writers that historical accuracy was essential to the integrity of the series. Correct geographic names, authentic Indian practices, military terminology, and utilizing actual names of the original buildings of the real fort, was insisted upon. So when the radio characters referred to the sutler's store (which is what the trading post was called prior to 1870), the surgeon's quarters, Old Bedlam (the officers' quarters) or the old bakery, they were naming actual structures in the original fort. While Macdonnell planned to use the same writers, soundmen, and supporting actors in Fort Laramie that he relied upon in Gunsmoke, he naturally picked different leads. Heading up the cast was a 39 year old, Canadian-born actor with a long history in broadcasting and the movies, Raymond Burr. He had begun his career in 1939, alternating between the stage and radio. He turned to Hollywood, and from 1946 until he got the part of Captain Lee Quince in Fort Laramie in 1956, he had appeared in thirty-seven films. A few were excellent (Rear Window, The Blue Gardenia) some were average (Walk a Crooked Mile, A Place in the Sun) but many were plain awful (Bride of Vengeance, Red Light, and Abandoned). With Burr in the lead, Macdonnell selected two supporting players: Vic Perrin as "Sgt. Goerss" and Jack Moyles as "Major Daggett", the commanding officer of the post. (The original Fort Laramie usually had a Lieutenant Colonel as the C.O. but Macdonnell probably preferred a shorter military title.) Perrin, a 40 year old veteran radio actor had been in countless productions, but had achieved name recognition only on The Zane Grey Show where he played the lead, "Tex Thorne." THIS EPISODE: September 30, 1956. CBS network. "A Small Beginning". Sustaining. Lee Quince and the troop must find Sitting Bull, somewhere in the Black Hills. The program was recorded September 20, 1956. Raymond Burr, Les Crutchfield (writer), Sam Edwards, Jess Kirkpatrick, Jack Kruschen, Joseph Cranston, Howard Culver, Lawrence Dobkin, John Dehner. 1/2 hour.

DATE: Tue, 06 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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Top Secret - The Poisoned Hand Of Friendship (09-25-50)

The Poisoned Hand Of Friendship (Aired September 25, 1950) The role played by Ilona Massey, a Hungarian-born actress, was created in her likeness, which included her sultry voice and her heavy accent. As a government agent, Massey witnesses train murders, orders poisoned glasses of brandy, and examines the tattoos on a rebellious pigeon. She travels to Tangiers, London, and discovers Nazi spy rings in Berlin. Pack your suitcase, slip into your designer incognito clothiers, and cut your tongue out because Ilona Massey is ready to take you on the top secret mission of a lifetime! 6-12-50 to 10-26-50 NBC, various 30 minute timeslots. STAR: Ilona Massey as a Mata Hari-style operative in World War II. ORCHESTRAL: Roy Shield. WRITER-DIRECTOR: Harry W. Junkin. Top secret was highly effective, said Radio Life: the role played by the Hungarian actress was “tailor-made for her sultry voice and heavy accent”.

DATE: Mon, 05 Jul 2010
SIZE: 13.1 MB
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The Caltex Theater The Big Smoke (1955)

The Big Smoke (1955) *The Exact Date Is Unknown The Caltex Theater was an Australian show similar to the American Lux Radio Theater. It was sponsored by the Caltex Oil Company. Mostly the radio shows were adapted from top movies from the time period. The show aired from 1950 - 1959 with somewhere around 490 shows. This hour long series was well produced, directed and acted out. Though the series ran for 9 years, it's tough finding more than ten episodes whose audio quality is up to rebroadcast standards.

DATE: Mon, 05 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.87 MB
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Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Frontier Gentleman" - Wonder Boy (08-17-58)

Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Frontier Gentleman" - Wonder Boy (Aired August 17, 1958) Frontier Gentleman was a radio Western series heard on CBS from February 2 to November 16, 1958. Written and directed by Antony Ellis, it followed the adventures of J.B. Kendall (John Dehner), a London Times reporter, as he roamed the Western United States, encountering various outlaws and well-known historical figures, such as Jesse James and Calamity Jane. Written and directed by Antony Ellis, it followed the adventures of journalist Kendall as he roamed the Western United States in search of stories for the Times. Along the way, he encountered various fictional drifters and outlaws in addition to well-known historical figures, such as Jesse James, Calamity Jane and Wild Bill Hickok. Music for the series was by Wilbur Hatch and Jerry Goldsmith, who also supplied the opening trumpet theme. The announcers were Dan Cubberly, Johnny Jacobs, Bud Sewell and John Wald. Supporting cast: Harry Bartell, Lawrence Dobkin, Virginia Gregg, Stacy Harris, Johnny Jacobs, Joseph Kearns, Jack Kruschen, Jack Moyles, Jeanette Nolan, Vic Perrin and Barney Phillips. THIS EPISODE: August 17, 1958. CBS network. "The Wonder Boy". Sustaining. A young man with a very fast draw is bound to become a killer. An engrossing story with a real western flavor. The public service announcements have been partially deleted. John Dehner, Eddie Firestone, Stacy Harris, Virginia Gregg, Jack Kruschen, Ben Wright, Antony Ellis (writer, producer, director), Bud Sewell (announcer). 24:44.

DATE: Sun, 04 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.52 MB
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Chandu The Magician - 2 Episodes (07-26-48) (07-27-48)

Episode 21 "Betty And Bob Disappear" (07-26-48) and Episode 22 "Secret Door" (07-27-48) One of the longest running juvenile adventure serials on radio, Chandu, The Magician was heard as a local program beginning in 1931 on KHJ in Los Angeles until 1932. It was then heard, starting in February 1932, over WOR in the East. Nationally, it aired over MUTUAL starting 10/08/32 with Gayne Whitman in the title role, it was sponsored by White King Soap on the West Coast and Beech Nut on the East Coast. Howard Hoffman also took over the lead role for a period of time. Many scripts were later redone in a new series with Tom Collins in the title role beginning 06/28/48 again as a 15 minute program. This new series lasted 154 episodes ending on 01/28/49. The following week, on 02/03/49, the broadcasts were expanded to a full 30 minutes each, and each script was a self contained story line instead of a serial, but this time heard over only over the MUTUAL DON LEE network. Starting on 11/19/49 and running until 09/06/50, programs were heard over ABC. TODAY'S SHOW: Episode 21 "Betty And Bob Disappear" (07-26-48) and Episode 22 "Secret Door" (07-27-48) July 26, 1948. Program #21. Mutual-Don Lee network. Sponsored by: White King Soap. Betty and Bob discover and become trapped in a burial chamber. Vera Oldham (writer), Korla Pandit (music), Howard Culver (announcer), Tom Collins, Joy Terry, Norman Field. 15 minutes. July 27, 1948. Program #22. Mutual-Don Lee network. Sponsored by: White King Soap. Betty and Bob have discovered the hiding place of the malevolent Roxor and a clue to their missing father. Vera Oldham (writer), Korla Pandit (music), Howard Culver (announcer), Tom Collins, Joy Terry, Norman Field. 15 minutes.

DATE: Sun, 04 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.52 MB
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Dad's Army - The Royal Train (1976)

The Royal Train (1976) Dad's Army - there were a total of eighty episodes spread over nine series, as well as three Christmas specials. Most episodes were also adapted for radio. The show was set in the fictional seaside town of Walmington-on-Sea, on the south coast of England, making the Home Guard the front line of defence against an invasion by the enemy forces across the English Channel, which formed a backdrop to the series. The first episode, The Man and the Hour, began with a scene set in the "present day" of 1968, in which Mainwaring addressed his old platoon as part of the contemporary "I'm Backing Britain" campaign. It was a flash-back to the founding of the Walmington-on-Sea Home Guard platoon by Mainwaring after he had heard Anthony Eden's 1940 radio broadcast. The final episode, Never Too Old, focused on the wedding of Corporal Jones and Mrs. Fox, which was interrupted as the platoon were put on full invasion alert. The first two series were in black and white. There are three lost episodes from series two. Only film copies made of the episodes from these series survive; copies of series one were made for overseas sales, but there was little interest, so none were made of any series two episodes. The three episodes that exist do so because two were film recorded to show Columbia Pictures executives and another needed to be edited post-production.

DATE: Sun, 04 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.14 MB
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Box 13 - One Of These Four (05-08-49)

One Of These Four (Aired May 8, 1949) Box 13 was a syndicated radio series about the escapades of newspaperman-turned-mystery novelist Dan Holliday, played by film star Alan Ladd. Created by Ladd's company, Mayfair Productions, Box 13 premiered in 1947. In New York City, it first aired December 31, 1947[1], on Mutual's New York flagship, WOR. To seek out new ideas for his fiction, Holliday ran a classified ad in the Star-Times newspaper where he formerly worked: "Adventure wanted, will go anywhere, do anything -- write Box 13, Star-Times." The stories followed Holliday's adventures when he responded to the letters sent to him by such people as a psycho killer and various victims. Sylvia Picker appeared as Holliday's scatterbrained secretary, Suzy, while Edmund MacDonald played police Lt. Kling. Supporting cast members included Betty Lou Gerson, Frank Lovejoy, Lurene Tuttle, Alan Reed, Luis Van Rooten and John Beal. Vern Carstensen, who directed Box 13 for producer Richard Sanville, was also the show's announcer. The dramas featured music by Rudy Schrager. Russell Hughes, who had previously hired Ladd as a radio actor in 1935 at a $19 weekly salary, wrote the scripts, sometimes in collaboration with Ladd. The partners in Mayfair Productions were Ladd and Bernie Joslin, who had previously run the chain of Mayfair Restaurants. THIS EPISODE: May 8, 1949. Program #38. Mutual network origination, Mayfair syndication. "One Of These Four". Commercials added locally. Afloat with a murderer, but who? Alan Ladd, Richard Sanville (director), Rudy Schrager (composer, conductor), Russell Hughes (writer), Sylvia Picker, Vern Carstensen (production supervisor). 26:45.

DATE: Sun, 04 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.83 MB
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The Great Gildersleeve - Gildy Turns Off The Water (09-18-46)

Gildy Turns Off The Water (Aired September 18, 1946) The Great Gildersleeve (1941-1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catch phrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (10/22/40). He soon became so popular that Kraft Foods — looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve as the central, slightly softened, and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. THIS EPISIODE: September 18, 1946. "Gildy Turns Off The Water" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Kraft Parkay, Pabst-Ett. Gildersleeve decides to turn off the water of the residents who haven't paid their water bill. Bill Kelsey (writer), Earle Ross, Frank Moore (writer), Harold Peary, Jack Meakin (music), John Laing (announcer), Lillian Randolph, Louise Erickson, Richard LeGrand, Shirley Mitchell, Walter Tetley. 29:21.

DATE: Sat, 03 Jul 2010
SIZE: 5.68 MB
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Tom Corbett Space Cadet - Giant Of Mercury (03-13-52) Part 2 of 2

Giant Of Mercury (Aired March 13, 1952) Part 2 of 2 The original Tom Corbett series was published by Dell Comics beginning in their 4-Color series. The 4-Color series was used to try out new story lines on the public to obtain feedback. If successful the series would be spun off to form its own title. Tom Corbett won his own title after three tryout issues. As the popularity of the television series waned, Dell stopped producing the comic book and the series was then taken up and produced by Prize Comics. There were a small number of Tom Corbett comic books in Manga style published in the 1990s by Eternity Comics, but these are universally rejected as non-canonical by Tom Corbett fans. THIS EPISODE: March 13, 1952. ABC network, WJZ, New York aircheck. "The Giants Of Mercury Part 2". Sponsored by: Kellogg's Pep, Kellogg's Raisin Bran. The Metal Men of Mercury turn out to be controlled by space killers. Frank Thomas Jr., Jackson Beck (announcer), Jan Merlin, James Monks, Connie Lembcke, Don Hughes (writer), Al Markim, Drex Hines (director), Jon Gart (organist). 24:19.

DATE: Sat, 03 Jul 2010
SIZE: 6.77 MB
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Philip Morris Playhouse - Leonas Room (02-25-49)

Leonas Room (Aired February 25, 1949) Philip Morris invested heavily in radio advertising throughout the 1930s and ‘40s, often having two weekly programs on competing networks. The first, a variety show that ran for twelve seasons (1934-47) and combined musical and dramatic elements, was called Johnny Presents, essentially giving Roventini "top billing" above all the big name guests that appeared on the broadcasts. The cigarette company also sponsored Philip Morris Playhouse, a dramatic anthology series that lasted 14 seasons (1939-53), finally switching to television. THIS EPISODE: February 25, 1949. CBS network. "Leona's Room". Sponsored by: Philip Morris, Revelation Tobacco. A theater critic is blackmailed by a vaudeville mind-reader. A well written story! Vincent Price, Cathy Lewis, Morton Fine (writer), David Friedkin (writer), Johnny Roventini (commercial spokesman), William Spier (producer, editor, director), Lud Gluskin (music director), Art Ballinger (announcer). 30:18.

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